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R. Scott
May 23rd 05, 06:03 PM
In going with the current LONG thread. Whats the largest you've seen.
Here is mine.

I cannot confirm it nor find it. But in California (near the Bay Area
where I was stationed at Moffett) I remember seeing a Giant 3 elem beam
with Rohn 25 as the mast. I believe a Ham Friend of mine said it was an
80m Shorty (But it just seemed to unreal for me)

In Diego Garcia we used 3 Mono banders made from 2 Log Periodics the
Comsta gave them. The 20m was 7 or 8 elems. Was huge.



--
Rick
Everett, Washington
Remove THREAD to reply.

Richard Clark
May 23rd 05, 06:35 PM
On Mon, 23 May 2005 17:03:26 GMT, "R. Scott"
> wrote:

>In going with the current LONG thread. Whats the largest you've seen.
>Here is mine.

Hi Rick,

Drive 20 miles north east to Arlington. Find your way to Jim Creek,
and follow the signs to the Naval Station in the valley.

Look up. (if the rain ever lets up)

2400 foot vertical with a 1 square mile top hat.

73's
Richard Clark, KB7QHC

Richard Clark
May 23rd 05, 06:45 PM
On Mon, 23 May 2005 10:35:22 -0700, Richard Clark >
wrote:

>2400 foot vertical with a 1 square mile top hat.

Hmmm,

On reflection, that isn't in the Ham bands is it?

Well, it should be! That and Amateur Radar (and even AHAARP).

73's
Richard Clark, KB7QHC

Dave Platt
May 23rd 05, 07:31 PM
In article >,
R. Scott > wrote:

>In going with the current LONG thread. Whats the largest you've seen.
>Here is mine.
>
>I cannot confirm it nor find it. But in California (near the Bay Area
>where I was stationed at Moffett) I remember seeing a Giant 3 elem beam
>with Rohn 25 as the mast. I believe a Ham Friend of mine said it was an
>80m Shorty (But it just seemed to unreal for me)

I've been told that the gent who owns the Ham Radio Outlet dealership
chain has a site located in the hills south of San Jose, and that it
includes a 3-element 80-meter rotatable beam. I was told that the
whole setup is managed by remote control - the owner lives elsewhere,
and accesses the transceivers and antenna controls via a landline
connection of some sort.

Haven't seen it myself... it would certainly be impressive!

--
Dave Platt > AE6EO
Hosting the Jade Warrior home page: http://www.radagast.org/jade-warrior
I do _not_ wish to receive unsolicited commercial email, and I will
boycott any company which has the gall to send me such ads!

R. Scott
May 23rd 05, 07:44 PM
Richard Clark wrote:
>
> On Mon, 23 May 2005 10:35:22 -0700, Richard Clark >
> wrote:
>
> >2400 foot vertical with a 1 square mile top hat.
>
> Hmmm,
>
> On reflection, that isn't in the Ham bands is it?
>
> Well, it should be! That and Amateur Radar (and even AHAARP).
>
> 73's
> Richard Clark, KB7QHC

Yea Im just looking for the Ham Band types. Ive used Bigger (Comsta
Bullrings) but you know, there is practicality :D

Scotty N7HJ

--
Rick
Everett, Washington
Remove THREAD to reply.
#! rnews 1125
Xref: xyzzy comp.security.misc:97966
Newsgroups: comp.security.misc
Path: xyzzy!nntp
From: "JJonson" >
Subject: Prosumer Firewall router?
X-Nntp-Posting-Host: anc68cp221.sw.nos.boeing.com
Message-ID: >
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Date: Mon, 23 May 2005 18:45:14 GMT

I have tried several broadband routers, Linksys, D-Link, Belkin to use their
features to control WWW access in my home LAN. None of these allow you to
set restriction features within a time window. They allow you to block out
access at certain time windows by day of week, but they dont for example
have the flexibility to allow FTP access while blocking eveything else in a
time window.

Is there a prosumer level of router that has the added flexibility to set
access restrictions that are invoked within a certain time window? This for
a small home network behind a cable modem.

thanks


#! rnews 1734
Xref: xyzzy comp.dcom.lans.ethernet:59646
Newsgroups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet
Path: xyzzy!nntp
From: "JJonson" >
Subject: Re: Prosumer router?
X-Nntp-Posting-Host: anc68cp221.sw.nos.boeing.com
Message-ID: >
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References: > >
Date: Mon, 23 May 2005 18:46:30 GMT

thats a good point. I really was looking for more plug and play. I can see
myself spending inordinate amout of time working the kinks out of a linus
version.
"James Knott" > wrote in message
...
> JJonson wrote:
>
> > I have tried several broadband routers, Linksys, D-Link, Belkin to use
> > their
> > features to control WWW access in my home LAN. None of these allow you
> > to
> > set restriction features within a time window. They allow you to block
> > out access at certain time windows by day of week, but they dont for
> > example have the flexibility to allow FTP access while blocking
eveything
> > else in a time window.
> >
> > Is there a prosumer level of router that has the added flexibility to
set
> > access restrictions that are invoked within a certain time window? This
> > for a small home network behind a cable modem.
>
> You could roll your own, using Linux. That would give you as much
> flexibility as you want. Also, some of the Linksys models run Linux and
> there are many patches available, to add funtion to the box.
>


#! rnews 2308
Xref: xyzzy comp.dcom.lans.ethernet:59647
Newsgroups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet
Path: xyzzy!nntp
From: "JJonson" >
Subject: Re: Prosumer router?
X-Nntp-Posting-Host: anc68cp221.sw.nos.boeing.com
Message-ID: >
X-Mimeole: Produced By Microsoft MimeOLE V6.00.2800.1441
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Organization: The Boeing Company
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References: > > >
Date: Mon, 23 May 2005 18:47:38 GMT

thats a good point. I guess I can see enterprise systems having that time
based feature either.


"Al Dykes" > wrote in message
...
> In article >,
> James Knott > wrote:
> >JJonson wrote:
> >
> >> I have tried several broadband routers, Linksys, D-Link, Belkin to use
> >> their
> >> features to control WWW access in my home LAN. None of these allow
you
> >> to
> >> set restriction features within a time window. They allow you to block
> >> out access at certain time windows by day of week, but they dont for
> >> example have the flexibility to allow FTP access while blocking
eveything
> >> else in a time window.
> >>
> >> Is there a prosumer level of router that has the added flexibility to
set
> >> access restrictions that are invoked within a certain time window?
This
> >> for a small home network behind a cable modem.
> >
> >You could roll your own, using Linux. That would give you as much
> >flexibility as you want. Also, some of the Linksys models run Linux and
> >there are many patches available, to add funtion to the box.
> >
>
>
> Linksys has some "better" products that probably come out of the Cicso
> takeover that have lots more features. IMO time restrictions are a
> comsumer feaure and these are corporate products so you may be out of
> luck. SMC makes some nice network products too.
>
> For Linksys Take a look at this: (Scroll down)
>
>
http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.asp?Submit=browse&Manufactory=1413&subCategory=28
>
> --
> a d y k e s @ p a n i x . c o m
>
> Don't blame me. I voted for Gore.

Frank
May 23rd 05, 07:57 PM
"Richard Clark" > wrote in message
...
> On Mon, 23 May 2005 17:03:26 GMT, "R. Scott"
> > wrote:
>
>>In going with the current LONG thread. Whats the largest you've seen.
>>Here is mine.
>
> Hi Rick,
>
> Drive 20 miles north east to Arlington. Find your way to Jim Creek,
> and follow the signs to the Naval Station in the valley.
>
> Look up. (if the rain ever lets up)
>
> 2400 foot vertical with a 1 square mile top hat.
>
> 73's
> Richard Clark, KB7QHC

Anybody seen that massive antenna farm, just off I95, on the north west
side of Trenton NJ? Often wondered what it was.

73,

Frank

Brian Kelly
May 23rd 05, 08:26 PM
Dave Platt wrote:
> In article >,
> R. Scott > wrote:
>
> >In going with the current LONG thread. Whats the largest you've
seen.
> >Here is mine.
> >
> >I cannot confirm it nor find it. But in California (near the Bay
Area
> >where I was stationed at Moffett) I remember seeing a Giant 3 elem
beam
> >with Rohn 25 as the mast. I believe a Ham Friend of mine said it
was an
> >80m Shorty (But it just seemed to unreal for me)
>
> I've been told that the gent who owns the Ham Radio Outlet dealership
> chain has a site located in the hills south of San Jose, and that it
> includes a 3-element 80-meter rotatable beam. I was told that the
> whole setup is managed by remote control - the owner lives elsewhere,
> and accesses the transceivers and antenna controls via a landline
> connection of some sort.
>
> Haven't seen it myself... it would certainly be impressive!

Force 12 has a 3 elemnent 80M beam in their catalog. 61 foot boom, 52
foot turning radius with 83 foot shortened elements. A beast.

http://force12inc.com/F12-specs-mag-r1-0.htm

> Dave Platt > AE6EO

w3rv

Bob Miller
May 23rd 05, 10:52 PM
On Mon, 23 May 2005 10:45:57 -0700, Richard Clark >
wrote:

>On Mon, 23 May 2005 10:35:22 -0700, Richard Clark >
>wrote:
>
>>2400 foot vertical with a 1 square mile top hat.
>
>Hmmm,
>
>On reflection, that isn't in the Ham bands is it?
>
>Well, it should be! That and Amateur Radar (and even AHAARP).
>
>73's
>Richard Clark, KB7QHC

Isn't there a guy in Texas with an 80 meter beam?

And then there's w8ji & his 300 foot tower on his old cow farm.

bob
k5qwg

Jim Kelley
May 23rd 05, 11:05 PM
Bob Miller wrote:

> On Mon, 23 May 2005 10:45:57 -0700, Richard Clark >
> wrote:
>
>
>>On Mon, 23 May 2005 10:35:22 -0700, Richard Clark >
>>wrote:
>>
>>
>>>2400 foot vertical with a 1 square mile top hat.
>>
>>Hmmm,
>>
>>On reflection, that isn't in the Ham bands is it?
>>
>>Well, it should be! That and Amateur Radar (and even AHAARP).
>>
>>73's
>>Richard Clark, KB7QHC
>
>
> Isn't there a guy in Texas with an 80 meter beam?
>
> And then there's w8ji & his 300 foot tower on his old cow farm.
>
> bob
> k5qwg

I always thought the biggest ham antenna was supposedly the old W6AM
rhombic on Palos Verdes peninsula.

http://home.swipnet.se/dx/porthole/w6am1.htm






>

Richard Clark
May 24th 05, 02:17 AM
On Mon, 23 May 2005 15:05:03 -0700, Jim Kelley >
wrote:
>I always thought the biggest ham antenna was supposedly the old W6AM
>rhombic on Palos Verdes peninsula.
>
>http://home.swipnet.se/dx/porthole/w6am1.htm

Hi Jim,

Any picture that requires a satellite view must qualify as BIG.

73's
Richard Clark, KB7QHC

Fernando Diaz
May 24th 05, 03:20 AM
I believe that the Arecibo Observatory antenna was used for a moonbouce
QSO...!
KP4DX - Luis
"R. Scott" > wrote in message
...
> In going with the current LONG thread. Whats the largest you've seen.
> Here is mine.
>
> I cannot confirm it nor find it. But in California (near the Bay Area
> where I was stationed at Moffett) I remember seeing a Giant 3 elem beam
> with Rohn 25 as the mast. I believe a Ham Friend of mine said it was an
> 80m Shorty (But it just seemed to unreal for me)
>
> In Diego Garcia we used 3 Mono banders made from 2 Log Periodics the
> Comsta gave them. The 20m was 7 or 8 elems. Was huge.
>
>
>
> --
> Rick
> Everett, Washington
> Remove THREAD to reply.

Russ
May 24th 05, 05:25 AM
On Mon, 23 May 2005 18:17:29 -0700, Richard Clark >
wrote:

>On Mon, 23 May 2005 15:05:03 -0700, Jim Kelley >
>wrote:
>>I always thought the biggest ham antenna was supposedly the old W6AM
>>rhombic on Palos Verdes peninsula.
>>
>>http://home.swipnet.se/dx/porthole/w6am1.htm
>
>Hi Jim,
>
>Any picture that requires a satellite view must qualify as BIG.
>
>73's
>Richard Clark, KB7QHC

I'm surprised that no one has mentioned the Wullenweber's (AN/FLR-9)
that were used for radio survellence and direction-finding years ago.
They may not have been the largest, but they were certainly among the
most complex.

R

Wes Stewart
May 24th 05, 05:27 AM
On Mon, 23 May 2005 19:20:06 -0700, "Fernando Diaz"
> wrote:

>I believe that the Arecibo Observatory antenna was used for a moonbouce
>QSO...!

Yes it was. I heard their two meter signal using a HB 7 element Yagi
with the reflector about a foor off the ground and the boom propped up
on a ladder.

W5UN's EME array is "Mighty Big" too. I've worked him on two meter
EME 2XSSB when my antenna was on;y four 3.2 lambda Yagis.

http://web.wt.net/~w5un/mba2003.jpg

I don't have the links but some of the OH hams have some really large
stacked h-f arrays.


>KP4DX - Luis
>"R. Scott" > wrote in message
...
>> In going with the current LONG thread. Whats the largest you've seen.
>> Here is mine.
>>
>> I cannot confirm it nor find it. But in California (near the Bay Area
>> where I was stationed at Moffett) I remember seeing a Giant 3 elem beam
>> with Rohn 25 as the mast. I believe a Ham Friend of mine said it was an
>> 80m Shorty (But it just seemed to unreal for me)
>>
>> In Diego Garcia we used 3 Mono banders made from 2 Log Periodics the
>> Comsta gave them. The 20m was 7 or 8 elems. Was huge.
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> Rick
>> Everett, Washington
>> Remove THREAD to reply.
>

Ian White GM3SEK
May 24th 05, 07:10 AM
Fernando Diaz wrote:
>I believe that the Arecibo Observatory antenna was used for a moonbouce
>QSO...!
>KP4DX - Luis

Several times. The old 400MHz feed would work at 432, so on days when
the moon was at the right elevation in the sky, they had maybe 20
minutes operating time as it passed directly over the dish.

The last time this happened was about 20 years ago, and I was lucky
enough to make a QSO. Lucky, because I almost tuned right past him,
thinking "That's too strong to be a moonbounce signal."

I was running a kW and 8 yagis. The QSL card said he was running 10W...
and Arecibo.


--
73 from Ian GM3SEK 'In Practice' columnist for RadCom (RSGB)
http://www.ifwtech.co.uk/g3sek

Jim - NN7K
May 24th 05, 09:57 AM
Ian White GM3SEK wrote:
> Fernando Diaz wrote:
>
>> I believe that the Arecibo Observatory antenna was used for a moonbouce
>> QSO...!
>> KP4DX - Luis
>
>
> Several times. The old 400MHz feed would work at 432, so on days when
> the moon was at the right elevation in the sky, they had maybe 20
> minutes operating time as it passed directly over the dish.

As memory serves (cant find the article, in old VHFer magazine),
fellow in Portland Oregon copied Sam Harris W1FZJ, wit a 1/4 wave
whip stuck into the antenna jack of his Parks Converter, on 432!
Said they could hear Sam's beard rubbing against the mic !!

Also, what of the original "ECHO" , a metalic baloon launched as a
satellite- acted as a reflector - was pretty big for it's day, tho
obviously, not the most effecient. Jim NN7K

Jim - NN7K
May 24th 05, 10:05 AM
Jim - NN7K wrote:
>

>
> Also, what of the original "ECHO" , a metalic baloon launched as a
> satellite- acted as a reflector - was pretty big for it's day, tho
> obviously, not the most effecient. Jim NN7K


Not as big as I thought- only 40 meters dia! thought those were bigger!
Jim

W9DMK
May 24th 05, 03:02 PM
On Tue, 24 May 2005 04:25:49 GMT, Russ > wrote:

>On Mon, 23 May 2005 18:17:29 -0700, Richard Clark >
>wrote:
>
>>On Mon, 23 May 2005 15:05:03 -0700, Jim Kelley >
>>wrote:
>>>I always thought the biggest ham antenna was supposedly the old W6AM
>>>rhombic on Palos Verdes peninsula.
>>>
>>>http://home.swipnet.se/dx/porthole/w6am1.htm
>>
>>Hi Jim,
>>
>>Any picture that requires a satellite view must qualify as BIG.
>>
>>73's
>>Richard Clark, KB7QHC
>
>I'm surprised that no one has mentioned the Wullenweber's (AN/FLR-9)
>that were used for radio survellence and direction-finding years ago.
>They may not have been the largest, but they were certainly among the
>most complex.

The antenna you are referring to should be spelled Wollenweber, which
in German means literally a "wool weaver". They got that name because
of their resemblance to an automatic sock making machine.

There were several of those stationed at strategic places around the
world - mostly surrounding the USSR, and they were used by our people
for the purpose of eavesdropping on Iron Curtain communications. I had
some familiarity with the project in 1984-5 working for RCA Service
Company. The project was called Maroon Archer and had been around for
some time already. For example, there was one near Stuttgart. I'm sure
they have been dismantled by now.



Bob, W9DMK, Dahlgren, VA
Replace "nobody" with my callsign for e-mail
http://www.qsl.net/w9dmk
http://zaffora/f2o.org/W9DMK/W9dmk.html

Walter Maxwell
May 24th 05, 07:18 PM
>Also, what of the original "ECHO" , a metalic baloon launched as a
>satellite- acted as a reflector - was pretty big for it's day, tho
>obviously, not the most effecient. Jim NN7K

ECHO was a 100' balloon constructed from 1 mil aluminized mylar. It was an early
attempt to achieve global TV transmission by reflecting signals from the ground
station, launched on August 8, 1960. Proved unuseful due to the excessive power
required of the ground transmitter.

ECHO had two beacon transmitters, one at each pole, operating on 108 and 108.3
MHz. I had the priviledge of designing the antennas used on the beacon. One of
my colleagues at RCA designed and built the 10 mw transmitters. The purpose of
the beacons was to assure knowledge of the balloon's position duing launch in
case it was obscured by clouds.

Pictures showing the beacons and the technician attaching them to the balloon
material will appear in my book Reflections 3, which is now in the production
stage.

Walt Maxwell, W2DU

Walter Maxwell
May 24th 05, 07:23 PM
Oooops, I forgot to change to my new email address. Please change from
to .

Walt, W2DU

Russ
May 25th 05, 02:20 AM
On Tue, 24 May 2005 14:02:06 GMT, > (Robert
Lay) wrote:

>On Tue, 24 May 2005 04:25:49 GMT, Russ > wrote:
>
>>On Mon, 23 May 2005 18:17:29 -0700, Richard Clark >
>>wrote:
>>
>>>On Mon, 23 May 2005 15:05:03 -0700, Jim Kelley >
>>>wrote:
>>>>I always thought the biggest ham antenna was supposedly the old W6AM
>>>>rhombic on Palos Verdes peninsula.
>>>>
>>>>http://home.swipnet.se/dx/porthole/w6am1.htm
>>>
>>>Hi Jim,
>>>
>>>Any picture that requires a satellite view must qualify as BIG.
>>>
>>>73's
>>>Richard Clark, KB7QHC
>>
>>I'm surprised that no one has mentioned the Wullenweber's (AN/FLR-9)
>>that were used for radio survellence and direction-finding years ago.
>>They may not have been the largest, but they were certainly among the
>>most complex.
>
>The antenna you are referring to should be spelled Wollenweber, which
>in German means literally a "wool weaver". They got that name because
>of their resemblance to an automatic sock making machine.
>
>There were several of those stationed at strategic places around the
>world - mostly surrounding the USSR, and they were used by our people
>for the purpose of eavesdropping on Iron Curtain communications. I had
>some familiarity with the project in 1984-5 working for RCA Service
>Company. The project was called Maroon Archer and had been around for
>some time already. For example, there was one near Stuttgart. I'm sure
>they have been dismantled by now.
>
>
>
>Bob, W9DMK, Dahlgren, VA
>Replace "nobody" with my callsign for e-mail
>http://www.qsl.net/w9dmk
>http://zaffora/f2o.org/W9DMK/W9dmk.html


Here is what I found with Google:

http://www.answers.com/topic/wullenweber

A boyhood pal went into the Army and spent a year at Ramasun Station.
He explained it to me thirty years ago. As the article states, it is
a "Circularly Disposed Dipole Array". Other pictures show a building
in the center of the array where radio intercept operations were
conducted. The circuitry used to "rotate" the array was quite
complex. They have indeed been dismantled.

R

Joel Kolstad
May 25th 05, 02:52 AM
Walt,

"Walter Maxwell" > wrote in message
...
> Pictures showing the beacons and the technician attaching them to the
balloon
> material will appear in my book Reflections 3, which is now in the
production
> stage.

I swear it wasn't THAT long ago you released Reflections 2!

I have a suggestion for a topic to cover: The infamous discussion of, "How can
rho be >1 on a transmission line (terminated in a passive network)?"

---Joel Kolstad

W9DMK
May 25th 05, 02:30 PM
Dear Russ,

I appreciate the correction. Obviously the spelling was correct as it
was and the story that I had been told about it must be apocryphal. I
suppose even the surname (Familiename) Wullenweber would be a
corruption of Wollenweber. Your reference to the history of the system
proved quite interesting. Obviously, I was also wrong about the
location - although Augsberg is certainly not that far from Stuttgart
- Hi. When I lived in Wiesbaden many years ago I should have traveled
to the site and had a peak at it.



Bob, W9DMK, Dahlgren, VA
Replace "nobody" with my callsign for e-mail
http://www.qsl.net/w9dmk
http://zaffora/f2o.org/W9DMK/W9dmk.html

Walter Maxwell
May 27th 05, 07:18 PM
"Joel Kolstad" > wrote in message
...
> Walt,
>
> "Walter Maxwell" > wrote in message
> ...
>> Pictures showing the beacons and the technician attaching them to the
> balloon
>> material will appear in my book Reflections 3, which is now in the
> production
>> stage.
>
> I swear it wasn't THAT long ago you released Reflections 2!
>
> I have a suggestion for a topic to cover: The infamous discussion of, "How can
> rho be >1 on a transmission line (terminated in a passive network)?"
>
> ---Joel Kolstad
>
Hi Joel,

I tried to respond via Agent, which is my browser of preference, but as of
trying to respond to your post I can no longer access Agent to send. Still
don't know why. This is the reason for the delayed response.

Anyway thanks for your interest in Reflections. The second Ed was released May
2001 and was sold out early in 2004. Been workin' on the 3rd ever since. A new
Chapter 23 will have a new analysis of the quarter-wavelength transmission-line
transformer, to correct some misleading material in the original copy. The new
edition will also have some details on my development of the antennas that flew
on the World's first wx satellites, as well as some of the quadrifilar helix
antennas now flying on NOAA's polar-orbiting satellites.

Concerning a topic on rho >1, of course this involves lossy lines, which I have
never studied very thoroughly, so I'm not about to expose my ignorance in that
area. However, R.A.Chipman discusses it well in Schaum's Outline of Theory and
Problems of Transmission Lines. Recommended reading.

Walt, W2DU

Joel Kolstad
May 28th 05, 12:12 AM
Hi Walt,

"Walter Maxwell" > wrote in message
...
> Concerning a topic on rho >1, of course this involves lossy lines, which I
have
> never studied very thoroughly, so I'm not about to expose my ignorance in
that
> area. However, R.A.Chipman discusses it well in Schaum's Outline of Theory
and
> Problems of Transmission Lines. Recommended reading.

OK! Aas a matter of fact, I've scanned in Chipman's book (it's available at
http://oregonstate.edu/~kolstadj/ as "Transmission Lines (Chipman).pdf"), but
I haven't actually had time to read any significant chunk of it yet.

---Joel

Walter Maxwell
May 28th 05, 01:36 AM
"Joel Kolstad" > wrote in message
...
> Hi Walt,
>
> "Walter Maxwell" > wrote in message
> ...
>> Concerning a topic on rho >1, of course this involves lossy lines, which I
> have
>> never studied very thoroughly, so I'm not about to expose my ignorance in
> that
>> area. However, R.A.Chipman discusses it well in Schaum's Outline of Theory
> and
>> Problems of Transmission Lines. Recommended reading.
>
> OK! Aas a matter of fact, I've scanned in Chipman's book (it's available at
> http://oregonstate.edu/~kolstadj/ as "Transmission Lines (Chipman).pdf"), but
> I haven't actually had time to read any significant chunk of it yet.
>
> ---Joel

Yep, you've got Chipman nailed down! His tome is one of my bibles. The others
are Kraus' Antennas, and Ed Laport's Radio Antenna Engineering. I have scanned
Laport to a CD, which I'll send you a copy unless you already have one. It's too
large to email, and I don't yet have it available on my web page. So let me know
if you'd like a copy. It's also a gold mine.

Walt, W2DU

Joel Kolstad
May 28th 05, 02:16 AM
Hi Walt,

"Walter Maxwell" > wrote in message
...
> Yep, you've got Chipman nailed down! His tome is one of my bibles. The
others
> are Kraus' Antennas, and Ed Laport's Radio Antenna Engineering.

I have Kraus' book (the last edition printed! -- now that Dr. Kraus has died,
it'll be interesting to see if Ronald Marhefka releases another edition of
it?) and Laport's book from
http://snulbug.mtview.ca.us/books/RadioAntennaEngineering/. Is that the same
scan you have?

I tried to build a 2.4GHz helical antenna based on the information in Kraus'
book some 3 or so years ago now, but unfortunately it didn't work. Having
access to a network analyzer these days would probably improve my odds...!

Thanks,
--Joel

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