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Auxiliary Communications System (ACS)



 
 
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  #1  
Old March 4th 12, 07:41 PM posted to rec.radio.amateur.moderated
Bill Horne[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 111
Default Auxiliary Communications System (ACS)

I've just found out about a major change within the Emergency
Communications network of the Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency,
and that this new system is being implemented nationwide as an
alternative to RACES in disaster communications.

I'm writing about the Auxiliary Communications System (ACS), and I have
a whole lot of questions about it and about RACES and ARES and how they
fit - or don't - in the new system.

First, though, I need information about the new system, and where I can
find out about it. I haven't seen any mention of it prior to the March
ARRL Section Newsletter I read this morning.

Bill, W1AC

--
Bill Horne
(Remove QRM from my address to write to me directly)

  #2  
Old March 4th 12, 08:11 PM posted to rec.radio.amateur.moderated
Dave Platt
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 464
Default Auxiliary Communications System (ACS)

I've just found out about a major change within the Emergency
Communications network of the Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency,
and that this new system is being implemented nationwide as an
alternative to RACES in disaster communications.

I'm writing about the Auxiliary Communications System (ACS), and I have
a whole lot of questions about it and about RACES and ARES and how they
fit - or don't - in the new system.

First, though, I need information about the new system, and where I can
find out about it. I haven't seen any mention of it prior to the March
ARRL Section Newsletter I read this morning.


California has had an ACS program in place for some years now.
There's some overview information available at

http://w3.calema.ca.gov/WebPage/oesw...0?OpenDocument

As I understand it, ACS is intended to be a broad-scale incorporation
of volunteer communicators and communication technology, into a
state's emergency communications infrastructure. It can incorporate
CERT groups using FRS and GMRS, volunteers using the internet or fax
machines, satellite radio systems, etc. - not just amateur radio, as
RACES does. ACS communicators need not have amateur radio licenses,
unless they are actually using amateur radio for communications during
an ACS drill or event activation.

In my city and county, the same people who manage RACES are also in
charge of ACS (they wear multiple hats, as it were). We sometimes do
our drills under the aegis of a RACES activation, but if we're
incorporating non-hams into the exercise or if we're doing more than
two county drills per year we will do an ACS activation instead (ACS
is not constrained to the "two drills per year" rule which applies to
RACES training exercises).

--
Dave Platt AE6EO
Friends of Jade Warrior home page: http://www.radagast.org/jade-warrior
I do _not_ wish to receive unsolicited commercial email, and I will
boycott any company which has the gall to send me such ads!

  #3  
Old March 5th 12, 12:37 AM posted to rec.radio.amateur.moderated
Phil Kane
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 298
Default Auxiliary Communications System (ACS)

On Sun, 4 Mar 2012 14:11:33 EST, (Dave Platt)
wrote:

I'm writing about the Auxiliary Communications System (ACS), and I have
a whole lot of questions about it and about RACES and ARES and how they
fit - or don't - in the new system.

First, though, I need information about the new system, and where I can
find out about it. I haven't seen any mention of it prior to the March
ARRL Section Newsletter I read this morning.


California has had an ACS program in place for some years now.


Cal ACES was the Midsummer's Night Dream (I'm being circumspect in a
family-oriented group) of a maverick named Stan Harter who somehow got
himself appointed as the state's Emergency Communications Director
back in the 1980s after he messed up that function in the state of
Hawaii. He never heard of "use the resources within the system" and
decided that he and his hand-picked henchfolk knew more about
emergency communications that anyone else in the state if not the
world. He drove the professionals in public safety and even broadcast
(EBS) nuts trying to deal with him and his occasional skirting the
edge of FCC regulations. Needless to say, he had nothing to do with
RACES because we were "outsiders" to his world and made ACES the
competition. Stan is long since deceased and the two factions have (I
hope) reconciled but the mere mention of ACES drives some of us nuts
remembering its origins.

Oregon has a program that at one time was modeled on the California
program but because we have a strong integrated ARES/RACES team setup,
OR-ACES has adopted the role of setting standards and providing
training for volunteers in emergency communications, not only for
ARES/RACES, and has redesignated the acronym as Auxiliary
Communications Emergency Solutions. I have taken their course and it
is excellent.

'Nuff said.....
---

73 de K2ASP - Phil Kane

From a Clearing in the Silicon Forest

Beaverton (Washington County) Oregon

e-mail: k2asp [at] arrl [dot] net

  #4  
Old March 5th 12, 04:17 AM posted to rec.radio.amateur.moderated
John Davis[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9
Default Auxiliary Communications System (ACS)

On 3/4/2012 2:11 PM, Dave Platt wrote:
I've just found out about a major change within the Emergency
Communications network of the Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency,
and that this new system is being implemented nationwide as an
alternative to RACES in disaster communications.

I'm writing about the Auxiliary Communications System (ACS), and I have
a whole lot of questions about it and about RACES and ARES and how they
fit - or don't - in the new system.

First, though, I need information about the new system, and where I can
find out about it. I haven't seen any mention of it prior to the March
ARRL Section Newsletter I read this morning.


California has had an ACS program in place for some years now.
There's some overview information available at

http://w3.calema.ca.gov/WebPage/oesw...0?OpenDocument

As I understand it, ACS is intended to be a broad-scale incorporation
of volunteer communicators and communication technology, into a
state's emergency communications infrastructure. It can incorporate
CERT groups using FRS and GMRS, volunteers using the internet or fax
machines, satellite radio systems, etc. - not just amateur radio, as
RACES does. ACS communicators need not have amateur radio licenses,
unless they are actually using amateur radio for communications during
an ACS drill or event activation.

In my city and county, the same people who manage RACES are also in
charge of ACS (they wear multiple hats, as it were). We sometimes do
our drills under the aegis of a RACES activation, but if we're
incorporating non-hams into the exercise or if we're doing more than
two county drills per year we will do an ACS activation instead (ACS
is not constrained to the "two drills per year" rule which applies to
RACES training exercises).


Having spent 25 years + as a Police dispatcher, And in one case
resolving a situation entirely via Ham Radio (A disable ham who I happen
to know personally was broke down on the road and needed a tow truck,
Normally we would just transfer the call but in his case..
Communications impaired,, I had the ability to understand him so had to
translate for the tow truck. Got him all towed away)

I know the value of good communications.. Often the BEST comm is via ham
radio.. However for short range stuff.. Other services work well too.

I can imagine a situtation (Imagine,,, Heck, been there done that) where
there would not be enough hams or police either, and the need to enlist
"Civilian" help could be handy.. With FRS and GMRS types, one ham can be
in say 20 places at one time... Provided they are close enough.

But than that is why my motor home is part porcupine.

2mtr, 70 cm and CB (2 of each, though the CB antennas are hidden, short
range) FRS (hand held) GMRS when I next renew the license (not likely
soon) Cellular, including a cell "Extender" type repeater, and then
there is the long wire for the main box when parked.


--
Nothing adds Excitement like something that is none of your business.
Remove the invalid part to email me.

 




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