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CB radios, ham radios, and frs.gmrs radios outlawed



 
 
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  #1  
Old November 11th 09, 11:45 PM posted to rec.radio.amateur.policy,rec.radio.cb,alt.radio.family,rec.radio.scanner,alt.radio.scanner
radioguy
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 159
Default CB radios, ham radios, and frs.gmrs radios outlawed

CB radio and ham radio has recently been outlawed in Ontario, Canada
as part of the cell phone ban while ddriving. No, this is not another
case of vagurly or broadly worded law. This was deliberate. And if it
can happen in Canada, which it did, it can also happen in the U.S

Notice the CB and ham radio excuse of using microphones being safer
doesn't hold any water with the government lawmakers: And I've seen
the same similar description elsewhere of lawmakers in the U.S. saying
two way radios are even more dangerous than cell phones because of all
the buttons and dials and cord on the microphone which has to be hand
held.

Where do they get this stuff?

CBs and ham radios have been being used mobile since at least the 60's
and in the 50 years since then, I've never heard of any accidents
caused by people talking on the radio in tthe U.S., even when the CB
craze was at it's height with more people on CBs than are now on cell
phones.

At first glance, I thought this also outlawed frs/gmrs. At second
glance, it looks like they will still allow frs.gmrs. At third glance,
I can't tell if they're permitting frs/gmrs or outlawing it.

"According to the Ontario Trucking Association, the government plans
to phase out CBs and similar UHF/VHF radios over the next three years"

"Officials insist CBs present a particular challenge since the
receiver and communications unit are separate from each other and
connected by a cord"


"TORONTO — It’s enough to make CW McCall switch to singing the blues.

Ontario’s ban on hand-held cell phones, texting and other
communication devices while driving kicks in on October 26, and
surprisingly, the government has included truckers’ Citizen Band
Radios (CBs) and similar types of two-way radios in the ban.

According to the Ontario Trucking Association, the government plans to
phase out CBs and similar UHF/VHF radios over the next three years,
assuming that two-way, hands-free technologies are developed within
that time. The OTA says that the Ministry could extend that timeframe
should no suitable technology be readily available to replace CBs.

Officials insist CBs present a particular challenge since the receiver
and communications unit are separate from each other and connected by
a cord.

The pending Ontario ban on CB radios appears to be the only one of its
kind in North America.

The law, which passed earlier this year, officially takes effect on
October 26, where the focus will be on educating drivers. Police will
start issuing tickets on February 1, 2010 for non-compliance.

The set fine for talking without hands-free setting or Bluetooth while
driving has yet to be determined before that date. However, the fine
range permissible for this offense is between $60 and $500.
Reportedly, demerit points will not be handed out for violations.

There are some accommodations for the commercial sector, however,
including permanent exemptions for satellite, navigation, collision
avoidance and other fleet management systems for the viewing of
logistical information on a display as long as the vehicle is not in
motion and the device is not held in hand.

The same goes for hand-held push-to-talk devices, hand mics and walkie-
talkies, which are popular in short-haul and vocational applications
especially.

Just as the law applies to standard cell phones, push-to-talk devices
can only be used while driving if they are mounted or secured to the
vehicle and is easily accessible and activated by one press of a
button. It cannot be hanging from the roof of the cab or dashboard.

OTA played a big part in winning some exemptions. Before the finishing
touches were made to the law, MTO officials were taken to trucking
companies to witness the need of such technology in daily operations.

The OTA supported the intent and the principle of the law. It says the
final version “is directionally appropriate.”

“We support the hand-held cell-phone ban and believe that the Ministry
has made reasonable accommodation for most of the other hand-held
devices used by industry that serve an important business purpose.”

However, Bradley concedes that the three-year phase-out of hand-held
CBs is likely to draw the attention of many truck drivers.

“Given the still pervasive use of these devices in the industry, I
expect there could be push-back from some truck drivers,” he said. “In
many respects the CB is not only an important part of the truckers’
social network, but it is also an important safety device in its own
right.”



http://www.myettnews.com/2009/10/ove...des-cb-radios/





  #2  
Old November 12th 09, 12:07 AM posted to rec.radio.amateur.policy,rec.radio.cb,alt.radio.family,rec.radio.scanner,alt.radio.scanner
radioguy
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 159
Default CB radios, ham radios, and frs.gmrs radios outlawed

okay, I found a little more information, which beings up some more
questions.

Especially since I might be visiting Canada again sometime in the
future.

As I understand it, U.S. law prohibits on CB and ham radio what
Canadian law now requires.

hmmm... This information states that it's a little bit different way
than the other article stated how the law was.

The other one stated Ontario is phasing out CB and ham radio
completely.

This one states Ontario is just requiring CB and ham radio to use
hands-free devices.

Now I'm not sure which one to believe.

http://www.southgatearc.org/news/oct...free_rules.htm







  #3  
Old November 12th 09, 01:54 AM posted to rec.radio.amateur.policy,rec.radio.cb,alt.radio.family,rec.radio.scanner,alt.radio.scanner
Douche Bag
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 168
Default CB radios, ham radios, and frs.gmrs radios outlawed

On Nov 11, 6:45*pm, radioguy wrote:
CB radio and ham radio has recently been outlawed in Ontario, Canada
as part of the cell phone ban *while ddriving. No, this is not another
case of vagurly or broadly worded law. This was deliberate. And if it
can happen in Canada, which it did, it can also happen in the U.S

Notice the CB and ham radio excuse of using microphones being safer
doesn't hold any water with the government lawmakers: And I've seen
the same similar description elsewhere of lawmakers in the U.S. saying
two way radios are even more dangerous than cell phones because of all
the buttons and dials and cord on the microphone which has to be hand
held.

Where do they get this stuff?

CBs and ham radios have been being used mobile since at least the 60's
and in the 50 years since then, I've never heard of any accidents
caused by people talking on the radio in tthe U.S., even when the CB
craze was at it's height with more people on CBs than are now on cell
phones.

At first glance, I thought this also outlawed frs/gmrs. At second
glance, it looks like they will still allow frs.gmrs. At third glance,
I can't tell if they're permitting frs/gmrs or outlawing it.

"According to the Ontario Trucking Association, the government plans
to phase out CBs and similar UHF/VHF radios over the next three years"

"Officials insist CBs present a particular challenge since the
receiver and communications unit are separate from each other and
connected by a cord"

"TORONTO — It’s enough to make CW McCall switch to singing the blues.

Ontario’s ban on hand-held cell phones, texting and other
communication devices while driving kicks in on October 26, and
surprisingly, the government has included truckers’ Citizen Band
Radios (CBs) and similar types of two-way radios in the ban.

According to the Ontario Trucking Association, the government plans to
phase out CBs and similar UHF/VHF radios over the next three years,
assuming that two-way, hands-free technologies are developed within
that time. The OTA says that the Ministry could extend that timeframe
should no suitable technology be readily available to replace CBs.

Officials insist CBs present a particular challenge since the receiver
and communications unit are separate from each other and connected by
a cord.

The pending Ontario ban on CB radios appears to be the only one of its
kind in North America.

The law, which passed earlier this year, officially takes effect on
October 26, where the focus will be on educating drivers. Police will
start issuing tickets on February 1, 2010 for non-compliance.

The set fine for talking without hands-free setting or Bluetooth while
driving has yet to be determined before that date. However, the fine
range permissible for this offense is between $60 and $500.
Reportedly, demerit points will not be handed out for violations.

There are some accommodations for the commercial sector, however,
including permanent exemptions for satellite, navigation, collision
avoidance and other fleet management systems for the viewing of
logistical information on a display as long as the vehicle is not in
motion and the device is not held in hand.

The same goes for hand-held push-to-talk devices, hand mics and walkie-
talkies, which are popular in short-haul and vocational applications
especially.

Just as the law applies to standard cell phones, push-to-talk devices
can only be used while driving if they are mounted or secured to the
vehicle and is easily accessible and activated by one press of a
button. It cannot be hanging from the roof of the cab or dashboard.

OTA played a big part in winning some exemptions. Before the finishing
touches were made to the law, MTO officials were taken to trucking
companies to witness the need of such technology in daily operations.

The OTA supported the intent and the principle of the law. It says the
final version “is directionally appropriate.”

“We support the hand-held cell-phone ban and believe that the Ministry
has made reasonable accommodation for most of the other hand-held
devices used by industry that serve an important business purpose.”

However, Bradley concedes that the three-year phase-out of hand-held
CBs is likely to draw the attention of many truck drivers.

“Given the still pervasive use of these devices in the industry, I
expect there could be push-back from some truck drivers,” he said. “In
many respects the CB is not only an important part of the truckers’
social network, but it is also an important safety device in its own
right.”

http://www.myettnews.com/2009/10/ove...-texting-ban-i...


Move to another state other than the 51st!
  #4  
Old November 12th 09, 06:01 PM
n9zas n9zas is offline
Senior Member
 
First recorded activity by RadioBanter: Jun 2009
Posts: 155
Smile

You're reading more into this than need be. So don't believe everything you read...unless you're naive'!!
It's NOT happening.
  #5  
Old November 13th 09, 05:04 AM posted to rec.radio.amateur.policy,rec.radio.cb,alt.radio.family,rec.radio.scanner,alt.radio.scanner
Keith[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 57
Default CB radios, ham radios, and frs.gmrs radios outlawed

radioguy wrote:
CB radio and ham radio has recently been outlawed in Ontario, Canada
as part of the cell phone ban while ddriving. No, this is not another
case of vagurly or broadly worded law. This was deliberate. And if it
can happen in Canada, which it did, it can also happen in the U.S

Notice the CB and ham radio excuse of using microphones being safer
doesn't hold any water with the government lawmakers: And I've seen
the same similar description elsewhere of lawmakers in the U.S. saying
two way radios are even more dangerous than cell phones because of all
the buttons and dials and cord on the microphone which has to be hand
held.


This is no big deal. All you need is a bluetooth device with vox to
accomplish the task. For truckers this does make since, becuase they
need both hands free for the wheel and the trucks gears. I think the
impact on four wheelers is going to be very small since CB has basically
died for most drivers. It won't be a problem for hams either since they
can use VOX & Bluetoothdevices to talk.
If this law was passed thirty years ago it would be a problem, but with
all the high tech gear that can solve such problems it will be easy to
adapt for the changes in the law.



--
Best Regards, Keith | http://home.comcast.net/~kilowattradio/
Tired of Google Groups? Use free Usenet access & programs.
http://home.comcast.net/~kilowattradio/usenet.html
  #6  
Old November 15th 09, 02:11 PM posted to rec.radio.amateur.policy,rec.radio.cb,alt.radio.family,rec.radio.scanner,alt.radio.scanner
Stormin Mormon
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 58
Default CB radios, ham radios, and frs.gmrs radios outlawed

That's really sad. It's the end of an era for drivers.
Perhaps the CB makers will spring up with hands free CB, to
fill the need.

--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
..


"radioguy" wrote in message
...
CB radio and ham radio has recently been outlawed in
Ontario, Canada
as part of the cell phone ban while ddriving. No, this is
not another
case of vagurly or broadly worded law. This was deliberate.
And if it
can happen in Canada, which it did, it can also happen in
the U.S

Notice the CB and ham radio excuse of using microphones
being safer
doesn't hold any water with the government lawmakers: And
I've seen
the same similar description elsewhere of lawmakers in the
U.S. saying
two way radios are even more dangerous than cell phones
because of all
the buttons and dials and cord on the microphone which has
to be hand
held.

Where do they get this stuff?

CBs and ham radios have been being used mobile since at
least the 60's
and in the 50 years since then, I've never heard of any
accidents
caused by people talking on the radio in tthe U.S., even
when the CB
craze was at it's height with more people on CBs than are
now on cell
phones.

At first glance, I thought this also outlawed frs/gmrs. At
second
glance, it looks like they will still allow frs.gmrs. At
third glance,
I can't tell if they're permitting frs/gmrs or outlawing it.

"According to the Ontario Trucking Association, the
government plans
to phase out CBs and similar UHF/VHF radios over the next
three years"

"Officials insist CBs present a particular challenge since
the
receiver and communications unit are separate from each
other and
connected by a cord"


"TORONTO - It's enough to make CW McCall switch to singing
the blues.

Ontario's ban on hand-held cell phones, texting and other
communication devices while driving kicks in on October 26,
and
surprisingly, the government has included truckers' Citizen
Band
Radios (CBs) and similar types of two-way radios in the ban.

According to the Ontario Trucking Association, the
government plans to
phase out CBs and similar UHF/VHF radios over the next three
years,
assuming that two-way, hands-free technologies are developed
within
that time. The OTA says that the Ministry could extend that
timeframe
should no suitable technology be readily available to
replace CBs.

Officials insist CBs present a particular challenge since
the receiver
and communications unit are separate from each other and
connected by
a cord.

The pending Ontario ban on CB radios appears to be the only
one of its
kind in North America.

The law, which passed earlier this year, officially takes
effect on
October 26, where the focus will be on educating drivers.
Police will
start issuing tickets on February 1, 2010 for
non-compliance.

The set fine for talking without hands-free setting or
Bluetooth while
driving has yet to be determined before that date. However,
the fine
range permissible for this offense is between $60 and $500.
Reportedly, demerit points will not be handed out for
violations.

There are some accommodations for the commercial sector,
however,
including permanent exemptions for satellite, navigation,
collision
avoidance and other fleet management systems for the viewing
of
logistical information on a display as long as the vehicle
is not in
motion and the device is not held in hand.

The same goes for hand-held push-to-talk devices, hand mics
and walkie-
talkies, which are popular in short-haul and vocational
applications
especially.

Just as the law applies to standard cell phones,
push-to-talk devices
can only be used while driving if they are mounted or
secured to the
vehicle and is easily accessible and activated by one press
of a
button. It cannot be hanging from the roof of the cab or
dashboard.

OTA played a big part in winning some exemptions. Before the
finishing
touches were made to the law, MTO officials were taken to
trucking
companies to witness the need of such technology in daily
operations.

The OTA supported the intent and the principle of the law.
It says the
final version "is directionally appropriate."

"We support the hand-held cell-phone ban and believe that
the Ministry
has made reasonable accommodation for most of the other
hand-held
devices used by industry that serve an important business
purpose."

However, Bradley concedes that the three-year phase-out of
hand-held
CBs is likely to draw the attention of many truck drivers.

"Given the still pervasive use of these devices in the
industry, I
expect there could be push-back from some truck drivers," he
said. "In
many respects the CB is not only an important part of the
truckers'
social network, but it is also an important safety device in
its own
right."



http://www.myettnews.com/2009/10/ove...des-cb-radios/






  #7  
Old November 16th 09, 05:45 AM posted to rec.radio.amateur.policy,rec.radio.cb,alt.radio.family,rec.radio.scanner,alt.radio.scanner
Bandwidth[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6
Default CB radios, ham radios, and frs.gmrs radios outlawed

radioguy whined:

okay, I found a little more information, which beings up some
more questions.

Especially since I might be visiting Canada again sometime in
the future.

As I understand it, U.S. law prohibits on CB and ham radio what
Canadian law now requires.

hmmm... This information states that it's a little bit different
way than the other article stated how the law was.

The other one stated Ontario is phasing out CB and ham radio
completely.



Maybe poor wording, which is easily misunderstood.

First, the misleading subject:
CB and Ham radio are NOT outlawed. There is simply a ban on
the use of hand-held communication devices while driving a car.
This applies to ALL such devices, and there is even a ban on
use of hand held entertainment devices while driving.

There are presently exemptions for use within business, including
truckers using CB radio, and for Amateur Radio. These exemptions
last for 3 years, to allow the industries a chance to develop
hands free options.


Now, the "phasing out CB and Ham completely" suggestion:
This appears to be a very poorly written piece of reporting. The
3 years will be a reference to the 3 years exemption offered to
professional users of CB and to Hams. After that time, ALL
those users will be expected to use compliant equipment. This
may simply be an existing CB radio with hands-free technology
added (possibly plugged into the microphone socket).

When the UK government said that they were phasing out "27/81"
CB equipment, many people thought it was an end to CB. It
was really just that all new equipment would have to meet the
new standards.



Try going direct...
http://www.e-laws.gov.on.ca/html/sta...08_e.htm#BK128
http://www.e-laws.gov.on.ca/html/sou...s_r09366_e.htm


For those not covered by an exemption, consider some hands-free
options which have been available for decades. Repeat after me...

Voice
Operated
Switch.
(aka VOX).

It is also fine to use microphones with a locking PTT, you
are allowed to lock a microphone while driving as long as
it is fixed down properly.
TTI appear to make a hands-free kit for CB radio.


Now your comment, "never heard of any accidents caused by people
talking on the radio"
What you hear about is what the media decide to feed you. Mostly,
this is a combination of what they (or the government) want
you to hear and what will improve their ratings or sales. There
are plenty of very common events that no longer get covered by
the media, they are no longer shocking enough to bump up ratings.

It should also be remembered that the mobile communications market
is massive. Not just devices, but rather profitable minutes
are being sold. Calls made while in vehicles will account for
a large portion of that income. Different reports give totally
different figures for accidents caused that way, but one side
want a total ban on mobile communications while driving, and the
other wants to keep their profits.

It cannot be denied that some accidents occur, but the level of
the problem appears to be unknown. We may not be able to trust
any figures, as those collecting them will have been paid by
someone who wants to get a certain result.


According to a 2001 report, compared to mobile phones, you are
7 times more likely to crash because of your car stereo and 7
times more likely to crash because of other occupants of the
vehicle. It also suggests that you are twice as likely to
crash due to adjusting normal car controls than using a mobile
phone. I could show you a photo of the result of a driver being
distracted by the gear stick (causing a head on smash). Clearly,
having to fumble about for any controls is a distraction.
Once you go down the route of banning anything which could be a
distraction, you end up with single person vehicles with
everything possible being automatic and absolutely no audio
system or other accessories.
Johnny Cabs?


Regards,
Peter.
http://www.citizensband.radiouk.com
  #8  
Old November 16th 09, 04:45 PM posted to rec.radio.amateur.policy,rec.radio.cb,alt.radio.family,rec.radio.scanner,alt.radio.scanner
Ken Layton
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7
Default CB radios, ham radios, and frs.gmrs radios outlawed

And what do they think the police do? They talk on a handheld mic
connected by a cord to a Motorola VHF/UHF transceiver! And they do it
while driving too!
  #9  
Old November 16th 09, 08:56 PM posted to rec.radio.amateur.policy,rec.radio.cb,alt.radio.family,rec.radio.scanner,alt.radio.scanner
You
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 147
Default CB radios, ham radios, and frs.gmrs radios outlawed

In article
,
Ken Layton wrote:

And what do they think the police do? They talk on a handheld mic
connected by a cord to a Motorola VHF/UHF transceiver! And they do it
while driving too!


Ah, but they are "Trained Professionals"......
  #10  
Old November 18th 09, 05:44 AM posted to rec.radio.amateur.policy,rec.radio.cb,alt.radio.family,rec.radio.scanner,alt.radio.scanner
Bandwidth[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6
Default CB radios, ham radios, and frs.gmrs radios outlawed

Stormin Mormon wrote:

That's really sad. It's the end of an era for drivers.



Hardly, just the end of holding a microphone in one hand
and driving with the other. And only in that part of the
world. Hands-free options have been about for years, but
we have not been forced to use it.


Perhaps the CB makers will spring up with hands free CB, to
fill the need.



VOX equipment has been around for decades. Now TTI manufacture
a hands-free device.

The problem may be marketing. CB is now a small market, so
manufacturers do not push their products like other companies do.
There is no money for high impact advertising, so I guess that
many people do not know about the options available. That
appears to include the law-makers, who have left a period for
adjustment in the belief that there are no hands-free options
for CB.

So truckers can continue to hold the microphone in one hand and
a Yorkie bar* in the other, steering with their elbows. The only
reason for hands-free kit is that they have run out of hands to
operate the mobile phone with :~)


BTW: The Canadian law also allows police and other emergency
services to continue to combine driving with using the radio.
Clearly it's not dangerous when driving at high speed in an
emergency.


Regards,
Peter.
http://www.bandwidth.radiouk.com/
http://www.citizensband.radiouk.com/

* Brits who remember the 1970s will get this side-swipe at
the chocolate adverts. A TV advert showed truckers as
good looking, chocolate munching (yet not overweight) knights
of the road. Women of the day really believed this image,
blissfully unaware that truckers only ever let lady drivers pass
so that they ogle them and stare at their knockers - saving the
trucker the price of paying a pavement princess for a quick peek.
(A later campaign made it clear that this chocolate was "not
for girls", even printing the slogan on the wrappers - for which
they got in trouble.)
 




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