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Old June 7th 04, 05:36 PM
Art Unwin KB9MZ
 
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Default Antenna patent, (Fluid motions Steppir Antenna)

I notice that the STEPPIR antenna patent is still "Pending"
I thought that "pending" meant that the patent has been awarded
and awaiting printing! Fluid motions have been stating Patent pending
for more than a few months ( year)now and I have yet to see a release.
Anybody have any info on this ? I also noticed that another thread on
unconventional antenna design that the news release also stated
"patent pending"!
Has " patent pending "replaced the term "patent applied for" or has
the revised patent procedure and the USPTO fallen flat on its face ?
Art

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Old June 7th 04, 05:41 PM
Fractenna
 
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Has " patent pending "replaced the term "patent applied for" or has
the revised patent procedure and the USPTO fallen flat on its face ?
Art


Both descriptions are valid. Both denote that an application has been made. No
legal right of property has been assigned by the USPTO under these.

'Patent applied for' is less used compared to 'pat pending'...

73
Chip N1IR
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Old June 8th 04, 05:17 AM
Rick Karlquist N6RK
 
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Patent pending means the same as patent applied for.
No guarantee that it will ever issue. At least that's the
usage by the patent attorneys I work with.

What you are thinking of is the period of time between
when the examiner allows one or more claims and the
actual issuing (ie printing) of the patent. I recently had one of my
patents get issued by the USPTO, but the examiner had allowed all the claims
last fall. In that case, it was essentially a done deal when
the claims were allowed.

Also, it is now the case that after 18 months, patent applications
are public. You should be able to read Fluid Motion's steppir patent
applications by now.

Don't forget that it is possible that some patents have issued but
the very overworked staff at Fluidmotion hasn't gotten around to
updating the sales literature. I currently have over a dozen patent
applications in process at the USPTO and it gets hard to keep track of them
all, even with the help of our legal department.

IMHO, I don't see how they can patent the basic concept of
the SteppIR, but then I'm not a patent attorney. There
is the "Cliff Dweller" adjustable dipole as prior art, but will
the examiner ever find that. Maybe they are just patenting the idea of
the tape in the hollow tube.

Rick N6RK




"Art Unwin KB9MZ" wrote in message
m...
I notice that the STEPPIR antenna patent is still "Pending"
I thought that "pending" meant that the patent has been awarded
and awaiting printing! Fluid motions have been stating Patent pending
for more than a few months ( year)now and I have yet to see a release.
Anybody have any info on this ? I also noticed that another thread on
unconventional antenna design that the news release also stated
"patent pending"!
Has " patent pending "replaced the term "patent applied for" or has
the revised patent procedure and the USPTO fallen flat on its face ?
Art



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Old June 10th 04, 04:53 AM
Art Unwin KB9MZ
 
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"Rick Karlquist N6RK" wrote in message news:[email protected]_s53...
snip

IMHO, I don't see how they can patent the basic concept of
the SteppIR, but then I'm not a patent attorney. There
is the "Cliff Dweller" adjustable dipole as prior art, but will
the examiner ever find that. Maybe they are just patenting the idea of
the tape in the hollow tube.

Rick N6RK


Well I remember doing the same thing using a Mercedes car antenna
which had a nice drive on it where the plastic cord was changed to
wire. Worked O.K. when running the wire thru telescopic fishing poles.
The first printing of this sort of design was one described in
in many electrical journals in early 1970 . The antenna was sold by
Racal
( type AE3062) which was an all frequency monopole.
They used a glass fibre column and at the base were two driven spools
one of which had a flat silver coated copper tape and the other had a
flat insulator tape. These tapes were both joined to form one complete
tape which was driven up the mast (fibre glass tube column). In one
version they had a frequency discriminating bridge sensor for an
automatically tuned servo-system.They had two forms of antennas for
commercial and military aplications, 2-30 Mhz and 4- 30 mHZ with poles
65 foot high and 125 foot high. Unfortunately it does require a ground
plane to cover all frequencies a problem I over came with my
particular antenna by using a full dipole structure.
Like you I cannot see how a moveable conducting tape inside a fibre
glass tube
can be seen as a new invention or antenna device when the above
description
was so widely printed in the U.S. and sold commercially to boot!
Regards
Art





"Art Unwin KB9MZ" wrote in message
m...
I notice that the STEPPIR antenna patent is still "Pending"

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Old June 10th 04, 04:53 AM
Art Unwin KB9MZ
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Rick Karlquist N6RK" wrote in message news:[email protected]_s53...
snip

IMHO, I don't see how they can patent the basic concept of
the SteppIR, but then I'm not a patent attorney. There
is the "Cliff Dweller" adjustable dipole as prior art, but will
the examiner ever find that. Maybe they are just patenting the idea of
the tape in the hollow tube.

Rick N6RK


Well I remember doing the same thing using a Mercedes car antenna
which had a nice drive on it where the plastic cord was changed to
wire. Worked O.K. when running the wire thru telescopic fishing poles.
The first printing of this sort of design was one described in
in many electrical journals in early 1970 . The antenna was sold by
Racal
( type AE3062) which was an all frequency monopole.
They used a glass fibre column and at the base were two driven spools
one of which had a flat silver coated copper tape and the other had a
flat insulator tape. These tapes were both joined to form one complete
tape which was driven up the mast (fibre glass tube column). In one
version they had a frequency discriminating bridge sensor for an
automatically tuned servo-system.They had two forms of antennas for
commercial and military aplications, 2-30 Mhz and 4- 30 mHZ with poles
65 foot high and 125 foot high. Unfortunately it does require a ground
plane to cover all frequencies a problem I over came with my
particular antenna by using a full dipole structure.
Like you I cannot see how a moveable conducting tape inside a fibre
glass tube
can be seen as a new invention or antenna device when the above
description
was so widely printed in the U.S. and sold commercially to boot!
Regards
Art





"Art Unwin KB9MZ" wrote in message
m...
I notice that the STEPPIR antenna patent is still "Pending"



  #6   Report Post  
Old June 10th 04, 06:55 PM
Steve Nosko
 
Posts: n/a
Default

An application just means that the _applicant_ believes it is patentable.
If the examiner finds sufficient prior art, out it goes. On the other hand,
there is something to be said for applying several older ideas to a new
problem and making the _combination_ patentable.

--
Steve N, K,9;d, c. i My email has no u's.

"Art Unwin KB9MZ" wrote in message
m...
"Rick Karlquist N6RK" wrote in message

news:[email protected]_s53...
snip

IMHO, I don't see how they can patent the basic concept of
the SteppIR, but then I'm not a patent attorney. There
is the "Cliff Dweller" adjustable dipole as prior art, but will
the examiner ever find that. Maybe they are just patenting the idea of
the tape in the hollow tube.

Rick N6RK


Well I remember doing the same thing using a Mercedes car antenna
which had a nice drive on it where the plastic cord was changed to
wire. Worked O.K. when running the wire thru telescopic fishing poles.
The first printing of this sort of design was one described in
in many electrical journals in early 1970 . The antenna was sold by
Racal
( type AE3062) which was an all frequency monopole.
They used a glass fibre column and at the base were two driven spools
one of which had a flat silver coated copper tape and the other had a
flat insulator tape. These tapes were both joined to form one complete
tape which was driven up the mast (fibre glass tube column). In one
version they had a frequency discriminating bridge sensor for an
automatically tuned servo-system.They had two forms of antennas for
commercial and military aplications, 2-30 Mhz and 4- 30 mHZ with poles
65 foot high and 125 foot high. Unfortunately it does require a ground
plane to cover all frequencies a problem I over came with my
particular antenna by using a full dipole structure.
Like you I cannot see how a moveable conducting tape inside a fibre
glass tube
can be seen as a new invention or antenna device when the above
description
was so widely printed in the U.S. and sold commercially to boot!
Regards
Art





"Art Unwin KB9MZ" wrote in message
m...
I notice that the STEPPIR antenna patent is still "Pending"





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