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Old March 26th 07, 03:52 AM posted to rec.radio.amateur.moderated
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Default Rediscovering the hobby.


"Paul Huff" wrote in message
.. .
Steve Bonine writes:

Whatever else you do, renew your ticket. It's easy and free. When
you're 90 days away from expiration, visit the FCC web site and
request a renewal. Don't put it off thinking that you're going to
upgrade and then end up with no license at all.


This is definitely on the agenda, regardless of what happens. Only a
couple of more months and I'll be in the 90 day window Here's a
quick novice question for you: if I renew and have moved, will they
change my call or do I get to keep it?


You keep your call sign unless you specifically request a change. Keep in
mind that if you request a new sequential call sign that Techs and Generals
will receive 2x3 calls as there are no longer any 1x3s available for
sequential assignment.

By the way, if you don't have an FRN, you need to get one and have it
associated with your call. See the Universal Licensing System web page
(it's part of the FCC site) on getting one. You should take care of that
now. Then you can get a password and renew online. Otherwise you'll have
to file paperwork to renew.


Dee, N8UZE



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Old March 26th 07, 05:05 AM posted to rec.radio.amateur.moderated
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Default Rediscovering the hobby.

"Dee Flint" writes:

You keep your call sign unless you specifically request a change. Keep in
mind that if you request a new sequential call sign that Techs and Generals
will receive 2x3 calls as there are no longer any 1x3s available for
sequential assignment.

By the way, if you don't have an FRN, you need to get one and have it
associated with your call. See the Universal Licensing System web page
(it's part of the FCC site) on getting one. You should take care of that
now. Then you can get a password and renew online. Otherwise you'll have


Great! Thanks for the tip. I just signed up for my FRN, and archived
the info, so a month from now when I can renew. Done and done!

-Paul

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Old March 26th 07, 01:50 PM posted to rec.radio.amateur.moderated
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Default Rediscovering the hobby.

"Dee Flint" wrote:

I recently renewed via the W5YI website. I paid them a modest fee for the
service ($8.00). It was painless and easy, and they took care of EVERYthing.

http://www.w5yi.org/page.php?id=87

Howard N7SO


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Old March 26th 07, 02:25 PM posted to rec.radio.amateur.moderated
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Default Oops!

Sorry - Dee didn't write that -- *I* did! ;-)

"Dee Flint" wrote:

I recently renewed via the W5YI website. I paid them a modest fee for the
service ($8.00). It was painless and easy, and they took care of
EVERYthing.

http://www.w5yi.org/page.php?id=87

Howard N7SO



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Old March 26th 07, 03:30 PM posted to rec.radio.amateur.moderated
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Default Rediscovering the hobby.

Paul Huff wrote:
"Dee Flint" writes:


By the way, if you don't have an FRN, you need to get one and have it
associated with your call. See the Universal Licensing System web page
(it's part of the FCC site) on getting one. You should take care of that
now. Then you can get a password and renew online.


Great! Thanks for the tip. I just signed up for my FRN, and archived
the info, so a month from now when I can renew. Done and done!


I would like to encourage people who read this and think, "Oh, that must
be complicated" to actually go to the FCC web site, as Dee suggested and
Paul did, and register. It's a very simple procedure. This is one of
those excruciatingly rare occasions when you really do get something for
nothing. (Oh, wait. Taxes. Right. I *am* paying for that FCC web
site, after all.)

73, Steve KB9X



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Old March 26th 07, 04:57 PM posted to rec.radio.amateur.moderated
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Default Rediscovering the hobby.

Steve Bonine writes:

Paul Huff wrote:
"Dee Flint" writes:


By the way, if you don't have an FRN, you need to get one and have
it associated with your call. See the Universal Licensing System
web page (it's part of the FCC site) on getting one. You should
take care of that now. Then you can get a password and renew
online.


Great! Thanks for the tip. I just signed up for my FRN, and archived
the info, so a month from now when I can renew. Done and done!


I would like to encourage people who read this and think, "Oh, that
must be complicated" to actually go to the FCC web site, as Dee
suggested and Paul did, and register. It's a very simple procedure.
This is one of those excruciatingly rare occasions when you really do
get something for nothing. (Oh, wait. Taxes. Right. I *am* paying
for that FCC web site, after all.)

73, Steve KB9X


Yeah, I can second that. It took me about 30-45 seconds after I found
the link off the arrl.org home page. Just for the permanent record,
here's the address you go to:

http://wireless.fcc.gov/uls/index.htm?job=home

And just follow the instructions there. It took me about 5 minutes
start to finish.

-Paul, KC8IGJ

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Old March 26th 07, 08:49 PM posted to rec.radio.amateur.moderated
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Default Rediscovering the hobby.

"Paul Huff" wrote in message
.. .
"xpyttl" writes:


Yeah, a couple of months back I was looking into buying an HF rig to
see if I could have some fun with that, and most of the rigs in my
price range looked like they were QRP oriented. Though I _do_ have a
great assortment of computer parts lying around, I'm not sure many of
them would be useful in building my own rig


According to my map, it's just over 3 hours from your QTH to FDIM. Go to
http://www.qrparci.org and sign up for the Thursday events. There will be a
paper on micros in homebrewing. There will also be a bunch of great papers.
The FDIM activities on Thursday are so good you are kind of disappointed
when Friday comes around and it's time for Hamvention! If you can't afford
to do the whole, four-day gig, don't miss Thursday.

You are pretty close to the two best hamfests around, Dayton in May and
Findlay in September. Dayton is kind of a zoo, but there is noplace with so
much stuff, and so much opportunity to see stuff. Findlay is far smaller,
and far more laid back. It is almost the anti-Dayton. Perhaps for that
reason, it is the most enjoyable hamfest. But nothing beats the day before
Dayton!

Dee mentioned that you should go ahead and get your FRN. This isn't too
hard and you can do it right away. Once you have it, you won't believe how
easy it is to renew.

...

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Old March 27th 07, 07:03 PM posted to rec.radio.amateur.moderated
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Default Rediscovering the hobby.

xpyttl wrote:

According to my map, it's just over 3 hours from your QTH to FDIM. Go to
http://www.qrparci.org and sign up for the Thursday events. There will be a
paper on micros in homebrewing. There will also be a bunch of great papers.
The FDIM activities on Thursday are so good you are kind of disappointed
when Friday comes around and it's time for Hamvention! If you can't afford
to do the whole, four-day gig, don't miss Thursday.

You are pretty close to the two best hamfests around, Dayton in May and
Findlay in September. Dayton is kind of a zoo, but there is noplace with so
much stuff, and so much opportunity to see stuff. Findlay is far smaller,
and far more laid back. It is almost the anti-Dayton. Perhaps for that
reason, it is the most enjoyable hamfest. But nothing beats the day before
Dayton!



Getting on the air on a budget:


Go to a hamfest and pick up one of the older radios. There are some
deals to be had with old hybrid radios. Kenwood made some really nice
ones. There are some old Yaesu hybrids out there also. Of course, if you
get lucky, there are some deals on more modern ones also. I picked up an
Icom IC-745 for 250 dollars at a hamfest.

Next get a tuner. MFJ makes some decent HF tuners, and used are pretty
inexpensive.

Get some ladder line, enough to make it from the shack to wherever your
antenna is going to be.

Put up as much wire as you can. Feed it, and tune it.

My original setup cost me less than 350 dollars to get on the air, and
I had 80-10 meter operation (160 too if I didn't mind poor performance.


Note: If you want to go REALLY cheap, I picked up a couple of the old
single sidebander Heathkits at Dayton last year, mainly to learn about
tube radios. 20 Bucks apiece, and they worked. One band only per radio -
I got 40 and 80 meters.

Dayton is indeed a zoo, but it's a fun zoo.

- 73 de Mike KB3EIA -

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Old March 28th 07, 05:16 PM posted to rec.radio.amateur.moderated
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Default Rediscovering the hobby.

Michael Coslo wrote:

Getting on the air on a budget:

Go to a hamfest and pick up one of the older radios. There are some
deals to be had with old hybrid radios. Kenwood made some really nice
ones. There are some old Yaesu hybrids out there also. Of course, if you
get lucky, there are some deals on more modern ones also. I picked up an
Icom IC-745 for 250 dollars at a hamfest.


Your advice got me to thinking. What are the advantages and
disadvantages of buying ham gear at a hamfest, versus buying it on eBay
or via the various classified ads?

There's no doubt that going to a hamfest is fun. It's a place to meet
people, see equipment (both old and new), and generally have a rich
social and learning experience. There's likely to be some interesting
gear for sale, especially at the larger events. You can see what you're
buying, and you don't have to worry about shipping (or the seller just
taking your money and not sending the gear).

But buying via eBay or classified ad has its advantages, too. You can
research the features of the rig, using things like the eHam reviews, to
be sure that it really meets your needs. If you're willing to wait,
there's a more complete selection of equipment, so if you're in the
market for something specific you're more likely to find it. You can
check recent sales to build an idea of a "fair price".

I'm a bit hesitant to suggest to a new ham that they go to a hamfest and
buy equipment. I'm afraid that the equipment-buying experience at a
hamfest is too intimidating to a new ham. It requires more knowledge of
what's what, and how to size up what's a good deal, than most new hams
possess. Now if they have a buddy to help them, that's different.

Which gets us back to the point that several have made in this thread --
the importance of making contact with the local ham community.

73, Steve KB9X

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Old March 28th 07, 08:44 PM posted to rec.radio.amateur.moderated
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Default Rediscovering the hobby.

Steve Bonine wrote:
Michael Coslo wrote:

Getting on the air on a budget:

Go to a hamfest and pick up one of the older radios. There are
some deals to be had with old hybrid radios. Kenwood made some really
nice ones. There are some old Yaesu hybrids out there also. Of course,
if you get lucky, there are some deals on more modern ones also. I
picked up an Icom IC-745 for 250 dollars at a hamfest.


Your advice got me to thinking. What are the advantages and
disadvantages of buying ham gear at a hamfest, versus buying it on eBay
or via the various classified ads?


I've had two experiences on Ebay. One buying, and one selling. Both were
bad. When buying, the stuff wasn't as advertised, and under selling, the
buyer never showed up. Leaving bad feedback isn't much in compensation.

There's no doubt that going to a hamfest is fun. It's a place to meet
people, see equipment (both old and new), and generally have a rich
social and learning experience. There's likely to be some interesting
gear for sale, especially at the larger events. You can see what you're
buying, and you don't have to worry about shipping (or the seller just
taking your money and not sending the gear).


I simply love going to Hamfests. The socializing is fun. Lots of bad
food to eat too! Lots of interesting people to watch. If I had one
complaint, it is that Hamfests are similar to flea markets in that they
are starting earlier and earlier. Dayton is one exception, except for
Sunday morning.


But buying via eBay or classified ad has its advantages, too. You can
research the features of the rig, using things like the eHam reviews, to
be sure that it really meets your needs. If you're willing to wait,
there's a more complete selection of equipment, so if you're in the
market for something specific you're more likely to find it. You can
check recent sales to build an idea of a "fair price".


My XYL has a rule that I like. "On presently manufactured radios, if it
isn't 50 percent off new, buy new." On older stuff, if you can't see and
touch it, let someone else have it. Nothing like that warranty for me.

Collectors will have a different outlook, of course.

Your point about Eham is excellent, Steve. In fact, I would suggest
anyone who is interested in getting equipment should browse through
their reviews. I've spent more than a few entire evenings at their site.
I would note to the prospective buyers that they read the reviews in
addition to looking at overall ratings. There are some Hams out there
who never met a radio they didn't like! ;^) And a few who are really picky.


I'm a bit hesitant to suggest to a new ham that they go to a hamfest and
buy equipment. I'm afraid that the equipment-buying experience at a
hamfest is too intimidating to a new ham. It requires more knowledge of
what's what, and how to size up what's a good deal, than most new hams
possess. Now if they have a buddy to help them, that's different.


Yup, It's always good to have an Elmer with you until you learn the ropes.

The Hamfest also has one experience that I really love - even if some
don't - the discussion driving the sale. I just love that give and take
with the person selling the equipment. Unfortunately, some sellers don't
do this, but when I "lock horns" with a seller that knows how to deal,
we both have a great time.

Which gets us back to the point that several have made in this thread --
the importance of making contact with the local ham community.


And how!


- 73 de Mike KB3EIA -



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