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Old August 7th 09, 08:11 AM posted to rec.radio.amateur.moderated,rec.radio.amateur.misc,rec.radio.amateur.policy,rec.radio.info
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Default Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) Report 1669August 7 2009

Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) Report 1669 - August 7 2009

Amateur Radio Newsline report number 1669 with a release date of
Friday, August 7, 2009 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

The following is a Q-S-T. Restructuring comes to Tonga, 40 meter
expansion is delayed in France, four new hamsats are on-orbit but only
two are operational, a broadcaster is fined for alleged interference to
aviation radio and a long overdue editorial from us to you. What's it
about you ask? Find out right here on Amateur Radio Newsline(tm)
report number 1669 coming your way right now.


(Billboard Cart Here)

**

RESTRUCTURING: MAJOR CHANGES IN TONGA

Major changes are taking place in amateur radio in Tonga. This,
according to Paul Kidd, A-35-R-K, who tells the Ohio Penn DX Newsletter
that he recently had a meeting with that nations radio Licensing
Officer and the Technical Officer in the newly formed Department of
Communications. Amateur Radio Newsline's Don Carlson, KQ6FM, is here
with some of what A-35-R-K learned.

--

In the past, amateur radio licenses in Tonga have been managed and
issued by a variety of different government agencies. That's now
changed with the creation of the Department of Communications which is
already building a website and plans to make license application forms
available online.

For newcomers, a 'Novice' or some other type of entry level license may
be created to encourage more activity. The formation of a club station
and licensing classes, possibly through the Tonga Maritime Training
Institute, was also discussed.

Licensing procedures for visiting operators and yachts in transit will
be simplified, especially for those entering the country somewhere
other than the capital. The new agency may make it possible for
visitors to apply on-line, however, they will still want to see an
applicant in person before issuing a license.

As to call signs, A35 single letter suffix calls may soon be issued to
resident Advanced Class licensees, and possibly to special event and
contest operations as well. A35 two letter suffix callsigns may be
issued to entry level licensees while 3 letter suffix callsigns will
likely be issued to short-term visitors and transiting yachts.

In other changes, the permitted output power will increase to 400 watts
to bring Tonga up to the same level that is authorized in New Zealand
and Australia. The current 40 meter allocation of 7.0- to 7.1 MHz will
be continued but 7.1 to 7.2 MHz operation will be permitted on a
secondary basis as well. An allocation for 60 meters was discussed,
but no action on this will be considered until further studies and
consultations are made.

Maybe most important of all, A35RK says that Tonga now has a government
Emergency Response Plan, and amateur radio participation in it is
authorized. This, in conjunction with the Tonga Defense Force, the
Tonga Meteorological Service, the Ministry of Civil Aviation, and the
Tonga Red Cross. In all some very positive steps forward for ham radio
in that nation.

For the Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Don Carlson, KQFM, in Reno.

--

The Tonga government also intends to more carefully monitor amateur and
maritime communications in an effort to reduce unlicensed operation and
to insure compliance with regulations. (OPDX)

**

RESTRUCTURING: 7.1 - 7.2 MHz STILL OFF LIMITS IN FRANCE

If you plan to vacation in France, be sure to avoid 7.1 to 7.2MHz .
At least for now. This is because French telecommunications
authorities have not authorized that spectrum parcel in that country.
Although the Department that controls frequency allocation in France,
the AFN, has approved the use of that portion, it has yet to be signed
off by a Ministerial Decree nor published in the official Journal.

** HAM RADIO IN SPACE: FOUR NEW MICRO HAMSATS ON-ORBIT BUT ONLY TWOP
WORK

Four new ham radio satellites have been deployed from the Space Shuttle
Endevour during the now concluded STS-127 mission. The new birds are
named Castor, Pollux, BEVO1 and AggieSat but only two appear to be
working.

Castor and Pollux are reported to be O-K. They will transmit on
145.825 MHz at 1200 baud AFSK and 9600 baud FSK. The transmitter uses
the AX.25 protocol. Initial Keplarian elements to track them are
posted on the AMSAT website.

BEVO1 and AggieSat2 were also ejected together from the Space Shuttle
but it appears that they failed to separate. No signals have been
heard from BEVO1, although beacon packets have been reported as coming
from AggieSat2.

The current theory is that only partial separation occurred. And while
the inhibit switches keeping the satellites powered off have been
closed, allowing the satellites to boot up it is likely that the
antennas did not deploy correctly. AggieSat2 transmits with 1watt of
power so it is easier to hear, while BEVO1 only has 200 milliwatts out
during beacon mode.

More is on the web at
http://www.amsat.org/amsat/archive/a.../msg72870.html (ANS)

**

HAM RADIO IN SPACE: BETTER THAN USUAL PERSEID METEOR SHOWER ON AUGUST
12

Meteor scatter enthusiasts listen up. This year's Perseid meteor
shower could be even better than usual.

According to NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office, a filament of comet
dust has drifted across Earth's path. When Earth passes through it,
sometime between 0800 and 0900 UTC on August 12th, the Perseid meteor
rate could surge to twice its normal value.

Translated into ham radio language, this means more meteors leaving
ionized trails as they burn up in the Earth's atmosphere and more
chances for those involved in the meteor scatter mode to make contacts
by bouncing signals off those ionized trails.

You can check spaceweather.com for details on this years Perseid meteor
shower and tips on how best to observe it. (Spaceweather)

**

RESCUE RADIO: HAM RADIO REPORTS CITED IN CANARY ISLAND FIRE

Strong winds fanned forest fires on Saturday and Sunday August 1st and
2nd on the Spanish Canary Island of La Palma. According to news
reports attributed to unnamed radio amateurs large plumes of smoke
could be seen rising from the island's southern tip where fires were
active on two fronts.

The reports said that firefighters were forced to retreat as flames
raged out of control near two towns. Some 4,000 residents were
evacuated from the area Saturday.

La Palma is located of the coast of West Africa, and is one of the
least developed of the Canary Islands. At airtime news reports say
that the fire has destroyed some 50 homes. No other information on the
role ham radio operators may have played in rescue radio efforts was
included in news reports from the region. (Published news reports)

**

RESCUE RADIO: NEVADA COUNTY THANKS HAMS

Back in the United States, several Nevada Amateur radio operators
conducted a Simulated Emergency Test at the Panaca Nevada Fire
Department on June 27 and 28. The test was used to demonstrate ham the
radio operator's emergency communications capabilities using various
modes of operation. This included Digital, Single Side Band and CW.

Rick Stever, head of Lincoln Co. Emergency Management, thanked Lee Hone
K7NKH and Chuck Reifsnyder AD7OY for their help in organizing the ham
radio aspect of the event. Stever also voiced his support to the
members of the community who participated and who continue to support
the county's Emergency Management. (Lincoln Record)

**

RESCUE RADIO: HIGH WINDS VS. HAMS ACROSS THE MIDWEST

Central Indiana hams felt like thy got dumped on this past week and for
good reason. 4 to 8 inches of rain fell on south-central Indiana the
morning rush hour and the noon hour.

Johnson county hams, just south of Indianapolis, were busy calling in
reports of flooded streets as they had flashbacks to last years 100
year flood. That June 2008 event tore out bridges, ripped open a dam
and flooded homes throughout the county.

In rural Brown county, high winds toppled trees, damaged homes and
brought down power lines leaving thousands of residents in the dark and
without phone service. EMA Director Richard Woehlecke, K9VM, said it
was the worst flooding and wind damage that he had seen in a decade.

Further south in Jackson county, much heavier rains flooded county
roads keeping some closed for most of the week. Some hams maintained
stand-by communications throughout the incident.

And west if Indianapolis QIN Net manager Ivan Flint, W9ILF, is picking
up pieces of radio equipment and his home after high winds ripped
through the area. Flint's amateur radio and antennas were damaged as a
result of the high winds.

Reporting from Indianapolis, this is Jack Parker, W8ISH. (W8ISH)

**

ENFORCEMENT: FCC WARNS HLI ABOUT UNCERTIFIED VIDEO TRANSMITTER

The FCC has issued an official Citation to Hobby Lobby International
for marketing what the agency terms as non-compliant radio frequency
devices. According to the Commission, these devices called Pilot View
FPV 2400 video transmitter exceeded the maximum radiated power limit
for a Part 15 device.

Back on March 5th, the FCC's Spectrum Enforcement Division sent Hobby
Lobby International a Letter of Inquiry asking if the Tennessee company
was marketing an unauthorized radio frequency device through its
website. The company responded by telling the FCC that they began
selling the Pilot View FPV 2400 video transmitter in May of 2008 and
so far had sold 109 units of the device in the United States. Hobby
Lobby also noted that the Australian manufacturer of the transmitter,
Intelligent Flight, had represented to them that the device was FCC
compliant.

The FCC noted that Hobby Lobby sent a unit to a Commission's lab for
evaluation prior to receiving the Letter of Inquiry. After receiving
the Letter of Inquiry, Hobby Lobby contacted the test lab to inquire
about the test results. At that point it learned that the device is
not FCC compliant. According to the Citation, Hobby Lobby says that the
last date that a transmitter was received by it was November of 2008.
Its also the time when it lost all contact at Intelligent Flight.

In the Citation, the FCC says that it appears that Hobby Lobby
violated several sections of the Rules by marketing the Pilot View FPV
2400 transmitter in the United States. The company was then told that
future violations of this sort could lead to monetary forfeitures of up
to $16,000 for each violation or each day a violation continues. (FCC)

**

BREAK 1

From the United States of America, We are the Amateur Radio Newsline,

heard on bulletin stations around the world including the AA4ED
repeater serving Broward County Florida.

(5 sec pause here)


**

ENFORCEMENT: BROADCASTER FINED FOR AVIATION BAND INTERFERENCE

The FCC has affirmed a $4000 fine issued against California based Playa
Del Sol Broadcasters. This after it determined that a broadcast
translator at its transmit site was causing interference to three
frequencies in the aviation band. Bruce Tennant, K6PZW, reports:

--

On March 12, 2008, the FCC Enforcement Bureau's San Diego, California,
office received a complaint of interference from the Riverside County
Sheriff's Department regarding the aviation frequency of 122.875 MHz,
in the Indian Wells, California area. The Sheriff's Department
identified the interference as having the same audio as station KRCK on
97.7 MHz in Mecca, California. That's a station licensed to Playa del
Sol

On March 13, 2008, an agent from the San Diego Office traveled to the
Indian Wells and was able to detect the audio of KRCK on three separate
frequencies in the VHF aviation band. These were 109.5 MHz, 122.2 MHz,
and 136.1 MHz. The agent also determined that the three signals were
emanating from the KRCK studio which is collocated with FM Broadcast
Translator station K238AK.

On March 14, 2008, the agent returned to the studio location of KRCK
and inspected FM Broadcast Translator station K238AK. During the
inspection, the agent requested that the translator station be taken
off the air. By using portable measurement equipment, the agent
determined that all three signals previously measured in the aviation
band went off the air and returned whenever the K238AK transmitter was
switched off. The agent determined that the measured signals on 109.5
MHz, 122.2 MHz, and 136.1 MHz, were spurious emissions emanating from
station K238AK.

On July 31, 2008, the San Diego Office issued a Notice of Apparent
Liability in the amount of $4,000 to Playa. The notice found that
Playa apparently willfully and repeatedly violated the Rules by failing
to adequately attenuate by at least 60 db the spurious emissions from
its translator.

In its Response, Playa argues that a forfeiture is not warranted in
this case because it responded to the San Diego Office and addressed
the issue "promptly and fully," and that the violation was not willful
or repeated.

Now, after weighing the Playa del Sol response and in conjunction with
the agency's Forfeiture Policy Statement the FCC conclude this past
July 17th that Playa del Sol Broadcasting willfully and repeatedly
violated Section 74.1236(c) of the Rules. Considering the entire
record including the fact that Playa did not cease the unauthorized
emissions until the San Diego agent confirmed its translator as the
source of the interference, the FCC says that neither reduction nor
cancellation of the proposed $4,000 forfeiture is warranted.

For the Amateur Radio Newsline, I'm Bruce Tennant, K6PZW, in Los
Angeles.

--

Playa del Sol Broadcasting was given the customary 30 days to pay or to
file an appeal. (FCC)

**


ENFORCEMENT FOPLLOW-UP: FCC ISSUES $24000 NAL TO ALLEGED SHOPING
CENTER RADIO JAMMER

The FCC has issued a $24,0000 Notice of Apparent Liability for
Forfeiture to Kevin W. Bondy, licensee of GMRS station WQGX752, in
Encino, California. This for apparently willfully and repeatedly
violating Section 95.183(a)(5) of the Commission's Rules by engaging
in unlicensed radio operation and intentional interference to
licensed radio operations; and apparently willfully and Section 95.115
of the Rules by failing to allow an inspection of his radio
equipment by Commission personnel.

You may remember our story a few months ago when an agent from the Los
Angeles FCC office used direction finding equipment to locate the
source off interference to the shopping centers radio system. Using
mobile direction finding gear the agent traced the signal to Bondy's
car and accompanied by deputies from the Ventura County Sheriff's
office confronted him. The FCC agent identified himself to Bondy and
explained that a refusal to allow an inspection could result in a fine.
Then the agent asked Bondy if he could perform an inspection of
all radios in his vehicle. Initially, Bondy refused to allow an
inspection, then later agreed to allow an inspection, then refused
again. Bondy's refusal was witnessed by the Sheriff's Department
deputies.

Now, after weighing all the evidence the FCC says that in its opinion
that Kevin W. Bondy's actions warrant not only the base amount fine for
each violation but an enhancement based an several circumstances.
These include the nature, circumstances, extent, and gravity of the
violations, and with respect to the violator, the degree of
culpability, and history of prior offenses, ability to pay, and other
such matters as justice may require. Applying the Forfeiture Policy
Statement and the statutory factors to the case, the FCC concludes that
Bondy is apparently liable for a $24,000 forfeiture.

As is always the case, Bondy was given the customary 30 days from the
May 14th date of the liability notice to pay or to file an appeal.
That date has long since passed. Meantime an informed source indicated
to the CGC Communicator that Bondy may walk away free from the most
serious criminal charges levied against him. CGC reports that its
possible that a Ventura county prosecutor filed the wrong charges with
a wiretapping charge being at the heart of the matter. The presiding
judge dismissed that charge on July 23, along with another charge
stemming from it. As of now, the only prevailing criminal charge
against Bondy is one of making annoying phone calls, but the
prosecution has the option to re-file its case. (FCC, CGC)

**

RADIO LAW: COMMENTERS TO FCC FEAR IBOC INTERFERENCE

Mentions of alleged interference due to increased FM In Band On Channel
or IBOC digital radio m power levels are now cropping up in filed
comments to the Federal Communications Commission. The FCC had asked
about how to treat cases of alleged interference when it sought the
next round of comments on the proposed voluntary FM IBOC power
increase.

According to Radio World On-Line, approximately 32 of 41 comments filed
oppose a blanket power increase for IBOC operations. Many urge the FCC
to wait until after the tests being conducted by National Public Radio
Labs are concluded before the agency makes a decision on the proposed
power increase.

In its filing, NPR stated that the few commenters supporting the
proposed blanket power increase have offered no new evidence or basis
to justify the proposal. NPR calls this a significant omission,
particularly given the failure of the prior testing to examine the
impact of the proposed increase on analog SCA subcarrier services for
the visually impaired and other SCA compatibility.

The comment period on this matter closed about three weeks ago. (RW)

**


NAMES IN THE NEWS: K0DQ FIRST EVER TO WIN ALL MAJOR DX CONTESTS SINGLE
OP

A McLean, Virginia ham operating the 2008 CW weekend of the CQ World
Wide DX Contest has perhaps become the only person ever to win
single-op world championships in all six major ham radio DX contests
John Scott Redd, K0DQ, on the air from Aruba as P40Q racked up over a
million more points than his closest competitor in the Single-Operator
Low Power Class

Redd got his first taste of contest victory back in 1966 as a Navy
officer posted to Uruguay and operating CX2CO in the phone weekend of
the CQ World Wide DX Contest. Redd worked his way up through the Navy
ranks to Vice Admiral and became Commander of the Fifth Fleet. He then
served as a civilian in the Iraq Coalition Provisional Authority and as
Director of the National Counterterrorism Center before retiring in
late 2007.

But ham radio and contesting were never far away, and operating from
Mexico as XE1IIJ in the early 1970s, Redd won single-op world
championships in the CQWW Phone Contest, the ARRL DX Phone and CW
Contests and the CQ WPX Phone Contest. Thirty years later, when his
professional life permitted a little more hamming time, he added the
WPX CW crown as P41P, operating from P43P's station in Aruba, in 2002.
The only prize that eluded him was the CQWW CW. That is until now.

Redd has already been inducted into the CQ Amateur Radio Hall of Fame
for his contesting achievements on top of all his other
accomplishments. (CQ)

**

HAM HELP: FREE IARU LOCATOR MAPS

Everyone loves getting something for nothing so here's one for you.
Free IARU locator maps are available in PDF format for downloading.
Maps are available for many nations on all continents. The U-S map
includes Hawaii and Alaska. You can find them at
http://iarumapsrussia.webs.com. (G0GQK)

**

HAM RADIO ON THE WEB: QRP KITTS ON YOU TUBE

EA5BLP, has created a YouTube channel dedicated to QRP radios and their
operation. The videos no there were recorded with a simple photo
camera and mostly in a noisy afternoon of very poor propagation. QRP
kits covered include the SW-20, Ten Tec 1330, Weber dual band, K-1,
Heathkit hw-9 and others. The videos are at www dot youtube dot
com/user/ea5blp. (Southgate)

**

THE SOCIAL SCENE: ARRL / TAPR DCC IN SEPTEMBER IN CHICAGO

Turning to the ham radio social scene, the joint ARRL and Tucson
Amateur Packet Radio Digital Communications Conference will again be
held this year in the Chicago area. The dates are on September 25th
to the 27th. This conference offers both technical and introductory
presentations. The sponsors welcome the submission of both technical
papers and presentations for the event covering all digital voice and
data technologies. More information is on line at www.tapr.org.
(TAPR)


**

THE SOCIAL SCENE: ILLW THE WEEKEND OF AUGUST 15

Some 300 lighthouses and light ships representing 50 nations are set
take part in the 2009 International Lighthouse/Lightship Weekend and
the total number is expected to exceed 400 by the time the event takes
place. Organized by Scotland's Ayr Amateur Radio Group International
Lighthouse/Lightship Weekend will happen the weekend of Saturday,
August 15th at 0001 UTC through Sunday, August 16 at 2359 UTC. More
information about the event, including a registration form is available
on the web at illw.net/2009. (ILLW)


**

THE SOCIAL SCENE: CELEBRATING SVARC AT 50

And words of congratulations to the Scioto Valley Amateur Radio Club of
Chillicothe, Ohio which is celebrating it's 50th anniversary this year.
Established in 1959, over the years this club has served many amateur
radio operators in Southern Ohio. And in recognition of this milestone
the club will be sponsoring a special event station from 1400 to 2200
U-T-C on October 10th with stations will be operating on 10, 15 and 20
meters. Commemorative QSL cards will be available. More information
is at www dot qsl dot net slash W8BAP. (KD8EAD)

**

BREAK 2

This is ham radio news for today's radio amateur. From the United
States of America, We are the Amateur Radio Newsline with links to the
world from our only official website at www.arnewsline.org and being
relayed by the volunteer services of the following radio amateur:

(5 sec pause here)

**

EMERGING TECHNOLOGY: MARINE CORPS BANS SOCIAL NETWORKING SITES

The U.S. Marine Corps has banned MySpace, Twitter, Facebook, and
several other social media sites from its networks. The ban which is
effective immediately was instituted in response to a late July warning
from U.S. Strategic Command.

According to news reports the Strategic Command told the rest of the
military it was considering a Defense Department-wide ban on the Web
2.0 sites. This, due to what the government says are network security
concerns.

The Marine Corps says it will issue waivers to the Web 2.0 blockade if
a "mission critical need" can be proven. They will continue to allow
access to the military's internal "SNS-like services." But for most
members of the Corps, access to the real, public social networks is now
shut off for at least the next 12 months. (Published news reports)

**

RADIO FINDINGS: OLDER AMERICANS PREFER NEW GADGETS

A study called: "Graying Gadgets: How Older Americans View Consumer
Electronics." Says that 67% of those Americans over the age of 70 use a
cell phone on a weekly basis. Also that 27% more likely to visit
travel Web sites than the average Internet user, and 98% more likely to
visit health sites. When asked about what top five consumer
electronics they intend to buy in the next year, this demographic
listed High Definition TV sets, laptop computers, cell phones, digital
cameras or GPS devices.

Even though this group consisting of boomers and World War
II-generation Americans grew up with radio, it was not listed in their
top five items that they must have. For manufacturers of consumer
goods this seems to bolster the argument for having an AM / FM radio
included on cell phones.

More than 3,000 older Americans took part in the study in November and
December 2008. Those interviewed ranged in age from 55 to 85. (RW)

**

RADIO IN SPACE: YOUR NAME HEADED TO MARS

Your name and call could be added to a microchip on the Mars Science
Laboratory Rover heading to the red planet in 2011.

All you need to do is to go to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory U-R-L
found in this weeks printed Newsline report and fill in the blanks.
While there is no space for your callsign, many hams are simply adding
it right after their last name.

The Mars Science Laboratory is part of NASA's Mars Exploration Program.
This is a long-term effort of robotic exploration of the red planet.
The Mars Science Laboratory is a rover that will assess whether Mars
ever was, or is still today, an environment able to support microbial
life.

Again, to get your name on that Mars bound microchip is to
http://mars9.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/partic...name/index.cfm
(VK2SKY)

**

RADIO IN SPACE: EXTENDING THE WORLD WIDE WEB INTO THE FINAL FRONTIER

The University of Colorado at Boulder is working with NASA to extend
the Interenet into the final frontier. The two are working to develop
and test the new communications technology which will extend Earth's
Internet into outer space and across the solar system.

Called Disruption Tolerant Networking, or DTN, the new technology will
enable NASA and other space agencies around the world to better
communicate with international fleets of spacecraft that will be used
to explore the Moon, Mars and beyond in the coming decades. Or put
another way, its expanding the Internet where no website has ever been
before. (NASA)

**

ON THE AIR: CELEBRATING KARATE IN GERMANY IN DECEMBER

Members of Germany's Waldkirchen Radio Club will activate special event
station DP3SSKW on CW and SSB through December 31st. This, to
celebrate the 3rd ****o-ryu Shukokai Karate 2009 Worldcup. Skeds for 40
and 80 meters are possible via E-mail to DK7FK at b (dot) barth (at)
pension-monika (dot) de. QSL via the bureau or direct to DK7FK.
(Southgate)


**

ON THE AIR: UK RAYNET SPECIAL EVENT AUGUST 9

From the U-K word that Norfolk County RAYNET will be operational on

Sunday August 9th with a special event station. GB4NCR, from Walcott
in Norfolk on 80 meter SSB with a primary frequency of 3.663MHz. 40
meters will be used if 80 isn't open. QSL cards are available and can
be send either via the bureau or direct to G4PSH with a stamped
self-addressed envelope. (RSGB)

**

ON THE AIR: CELEBRATING THE SPANISH FORMULIA 1 RACE

Ham Radio will be a part of the Formula 1 Spanish Grand Prix will take
place in Valencia Spain from August 8th to 23rd. Commemorative
stations AM5FUV, AO5FUV, AN5FUV EG5FUV and EH5FUV will take to the
airwaves to help commemorate this years event. A special award will be
issued to those who will make at last 3 QSO's with 3 different event
stations. The QSL Manager will be EA5FL. Further information can be
found at QRZ.com. (Southgate)

**

ON THE AIR: THE IOWA QSO PARTY IN OCTOBER

Back in the USA the 2009 Iowa QSO Party takes place on October 17th
from 1400 to 2300 U-T-C. All band and modes are included but no
contacts using repeaters or other relay devices are allowed. More
information plus summary sheets are at www dot wa0dx dot org. (Via
e-mail)

**

DX

In DX, word that 3B8FQ has received approval and will be active as
3B7FQ from St. Brandon Island, in August. He will depart Mauritius on
the 10th of August and returns from St. Brandon on the 30th. Operation
will be SSB and CW on 40 to 10 meters. This may be his last visit to
3B7 for the next five years. QSL via K5XK.

More than 12,000 contacts were made by VK9NI from Norfolk Island during
mainly the RSGB Islands on the Air contest on July 5th and 6th. This,
despite poor band conditions on 160 through to 10 meters. A
nine-member team ran multiple stations using phone, CW and RTTY. If
you worked them, QSL as directed on the air.

JM1LJS and JA3RAF will be active from Wallis Island between August 9th
and 15th using the callsign FW1W. They plan to operate SSB, CW and
possibly some digital modes on 40 through 6 meters. QSL direct via
their home calls only.

A multi-national group is on the air from Swaziland until August 11th
signing 3DA0SS. Operation is from both the Hawane Resort and a
campsite near Manzini. Plans are to cover as many bands and modes as
possible, including PSK31, RTTY and CW. QSL as directed on the air.

OH1TX and OH0RJ will be leading a three man team on a two day trip to
Market Reef in mid-August. They expect to arrive on the `Rock' by noon
on August 10th and to depart early on the 12th. They will use the call
O-J-0Zero-Japan.

Lastly, CT1GPQ will be active from Timor Lorosae between August rd and
the 3rd of October. His activity will be on 40, 30, 20 and 17 meters
using SSB, RTTY and CW. The pilot station and QSL manager is CT1GFK.

Above from various DX news sources

**

THAT FINAL ITEM: AN EDITORIAL ON INTERFERENCE

And finally this week, we depart from the customary to bring you one of
our infrequent editorials. This one deals with malicious interference,
those who cause it and also those who seem to seek it out. Here's our
Producer Bill Pasternak, WA6ITF:

--

Over the past two weeks we have been getting complaints that Newsline
is jamming and in other ways harassing users of the frequency of 14.275
MHz on the 20 meter band.

For the record, we at the Amateur Radio Newsline are information
providers only. We have no broadcast equipment and we air nothing
ourselves. Our audio content is distributed over the Internet and by
automated telephone and is formatted for retransmission specifically
over VHF and UHF FM repeaters because that is where we believe that it
belongs. It was never intended for retransmission on the High
Frequency bands, however there are some hams who have chosen to do so
for reasons known only to themselves.

If you are among those being interfered with on 14.275 MHz and live
within the United States or its possessions, we suggest you obtain the
call letters of the station that is doing the rebroadcast that is
interfering with you and file a formal complaint with the FCC. It is
the responsibility of that Federal Government agency to police the
airwaves and only that agency can solve your problem.

That said, we would also question why anyone would even want to operate
on or near 14.275 MHz. That is a frequency with a long history of
being the home of numerous problems in our service.

With so many other frequencies available on 20 meters alone, there
would seem to be no reason to congregate on 14.275 MHz other than to
satisfy ones own voyeuristic needs. And in our humble view, that is
not a good reason to tune a radio to that frequency.

If you cannot help yourself and feel a need to be there, please do not
call or e-mail us to say that you were jammed or harassed. We will
only respond that we warned you not to waste your time operating on or
near 14.275.

I'm Bill Pasternak, WA6ITF, and that how we see it in the studio in Los
Angeles.

--

There is simple solution to the problem of 14.275 MHz or any other
frequency like it. Just don't bother listening and forget those who
are making it into a mess even exist. (ARNewsline(tm))

**

NEWSCAST CLOSE

With thanks to Alan Labs, AMSAT, the ARRL, the CGC Communicator, CQ
Magazine, the FCC, the Ohio Penn DX Bulletin, Radio Netherlands, Rain,
the RSGB, the Southgate News and Australia's W-I-A News, that's all
from the Amateur Radio Newsline(tm). Our e-mail address is
. More information is available at Amateur
Radio Newsline's(tm) only official website located at
www.arnewsline.org. You can also write to us or support us at Amateur
Radio Newsline(tm), P.O. Box 660937, Arcadia, California 91066.

A reminder that next weekend, August 15th and 16th is the Huntsville
Hamfest and the presentation of the 2009 Young Ham of the Year Award to
Andrew Koenig, KE5GDB. We hope to see and meet many of you there.

For now, with Bill Pasternak, WA6ITF, at the editors desk, I'm Don
Wilbanks, AE5DW, saying 73 and we thank you for listening.

Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) is Copyright 2009. All rights reserved.




  #2   Report Post  
Old August 7th 09, 03:02 PM posted to rec.radio.amateur.moderated
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First recorded activity by RadioBanter: Mar 2008
Posts: 115
Default Broadcaster fined for Aviation Band interference (from AR Newsline)

William M. Pasternak wrote:

ENFORCEMENT: BROADCASTER FINED FOR AVIATION BAND INTERFERENCE

The FCC has affirmed a $4000 fine issued against California based Playa
Del Sol Broadcasters. This after it determined that a broadcast
translator at its transmit site was causing interference to three
frequencies in the aviation band. Bruce Tennant, K6PZW, reports:

--

On March 12, 2008, the FCC Enforcement Bureau's San Diego, California,
office received a complaint of interference from the Riverside County
Sheriff's Department regarding the aviation frequency of 122.875 MHz,
in the Indian Wells, California area. The Sheriff's Department
identified the interference as having the same audio as station KRCK on
97.7 MHz in Mecca, California. That's a station licensed to Playa del
Sol

On March 13, 2008, an agent from the San Diego Office traveled to the
Indian Wells and was able to detect the audio of KRCK on three separate
frequencies in the VHF aviation band. These were 109.5 MHz, 122.2 MHz,
and 136.1 MHz. The agent also determined that the three signals were
emanating from the KRCK studio which is collocated with FM Broadcast
Translator station K238AK.


[snip]


In its Response, Playa argues that a forfeiture is not warranted in
this case because it responded to the San Diego Office and addressed
the issue "promptly and fully," and that the violation was not willful
or repeated.

Now, after weighing the Playa del Sol response and in conjunction with
the agency's Forfeiture Policy Statement the FCC conclude this past
July 17th that Playa del Sol Broadcasting willfully and repeatedly
violated Section 74.1236(c) of the Rules. Considering the entire
record including the fact that Playa did not cease the unauthorized
emissions until the San Diego agent confirmed its translator as the
source of the interference, the FCC says that neither reduction nor
cancellation of the proposed $4,000 forfeiture is warranted.


From Playa del Sol's perspective, this fine would be cheap at twice the
price. I was once a broadcast engineer, and although the salaries
weren't much to brag about, Playa del Sol would have to pay at least
ten times that amount to employ a licensed engineer for a year.

Since the FCC eliminated the requirement to have a licensed engineer
available, broadcasters have to trust the manufacturer's claims as to
the quality of their equipment, and guesswork as to its proper
installation and operation.

Yes, those grapes _were_ sour: but there's a serious point here. The
broadcast industry used to be a career path for ham operators who were
willing and able to take their skills and performance to the next level.
Now, broadcasters no longer have a pool of independent, neutral
expertise to rely on when setting up and operating RF devices.

W1AC



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