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Old January 10th 05, 05:41 PM
Paul
 
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Default FCC: Broadband Power Line Systems

7 January 2005
Source: http://www.access.gpo.gov/su_docs/aces/fr-cont.html

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[Federal Register: January 7, 2005 (Volume 70, Number 5)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Page 1360-1379]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr07ja05-20]

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FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION

47 CFR Part 15

[ET Docket No. 04-37 and ET Docket No. 03-104; FCC 04-245]


Broadband Power Line Systems

AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission.

ACTION: Final rule.

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SUMMARY: This document adopts new requirements and measurement
guidelines for a new type of carrier current system that provides
access to broadband services using electric utility companies' power
lines. This new technology offers the potential for the establishment
of a significant new medium for extending broadband access to American
homes and businesses. Given that power lines reach virtually every
residence and business in every community and geographic area in this
country, Access BPL service could be made available nearly everywhere.
This new broadband delivery medium could also serve to introduce
additional competition to existing cable, DSL, and other broadband
services. We believe these actions will promote the development of BPL
systems by removing regulatory uncertainties for BPL operators and
equipment manufacturers while ensuring that licensed radio services are
protected from harmful interference.

DATES: Effective February 7, 2005, except for Sec. Sec. 15.615(a)
through (e) which contain information collection requirements that are
not effective until approved by the Office of Management and Budget.
The FCC will publish a document in the Federal Register announcing the
effective date for those sections.

Final Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 Analysis

This document contains modified information collection
requirements. The Commission, as part of its continuing effort to
reduce paperwork burdens, invites the general public to comment on the
information collection requirements contained in this R&O as required
by the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, Public Law 104-13. Public and
agency comments are due March 8, 2005.

ADDRESSES: Comments on the information collection requirements should
be addressed to the Office of the Secretary, Federal Communications
Commission, 445 12th Street, SW., Washington, DC 20554. In addition to
filing comments with the Secretary, a

[[Page 1361]]

copy should be submitted to Leslie Smith, Federal Communications
Commission, Room 1-C804, 445 12th Street, SW., Washington, DC 20554, or
via Internet to , and
to Kristy L. LaLonde, OMB
Desk Officer, 10234 NEOB, 725 17th Street, NW., Washington, DC 20503 or
via the Internet to

or via fax at (202)
395-5167.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Anh Wride, Office of Engineering and
Technology, (202) 418-20577, e-mail:

, TTY (202) 418-
2989.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This is a summary of the Commission's Report
and Order, ET Docket No. 04-37 and ET Docket No. 03-104, FCC 04-245,
adopted October 14, 2004, and released October 28, 2004. The full text
of this document is available for inspection and copying during normal
business hours in the FCC Reference Center (Room CY-A257), 445 12th
Street, SW., Washington, DC 20554. The complete text of this document
also may be purchased from the Commission's copy contractor, Qualex
International, 445 12th Street, SW., Room CY-B402, Washington, DC
20554. The full text may also be downloaded at:
http://www.fcc.gov
http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/leaving.cgi?from=leavingFR.html&log=linklog&to=htt p://www.fcc.gov.
Alternate

formats are available to persons with disabilities by contacting Brian
Millin at (202) 418-7426 or TTY (202) 418-7365.

Congressional Review Act

The Commission will send a copy of this Report & Order, in a report
to be sent to Congress and the General Accounting Office pursuant to
the Congressional Review Act, see 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A).

Summary of Report and Order

1. In the Report and Order, the Commission adopted new rules for
Access Broadband over Power Line (Access BPL) systems, a new type of
carrier current technology that provides access to high speed broadband
services using electric utility companies' power lines. This new
technology offers the potential for the establishment of a significant
new medium for extending broadband access to American homes and
businesses. Given that power lines reach virtually every residence and
business in every community and geographic area in this country, Access
BPL service could be made available nearly everywhere. This new
broadband delivery medium could also serve to introduce additional
competition to existing cable, DSL, and other broadband services. In
addition, the National Telecommunications and Information
Administration (NTIA) has undertaken a significant effort to both study
Access BPL technology, including its operating characteristics and
interference potential, and to make specific recommendations to the
Commission for policies to encourage its implementation and to manage
its interference potential. Our staff has worked closely with NTIA on
this matter and the policy decisions and rules we adopted reflect that
cooperation and embody many of NTIA's recommendations.
2. Along with NTIA, we recognize the concerns of authorized radio
service users in both the private and government sectors for the need
to ensure that radio frequency (RF) energy from BPL signals on power
lines does not cause harmful interference to licensed radio services.
The record and our investigations indicate that BPL network systems can
generally be configured and managed to minimize and/or eliminate this
harmful interference potential. Our goals in developing the rules for
Access BPL are to provide a framework that will both facilitate the
rapid introduction and development of BPL systems and protect licensed
radio services from harmful interference. Specifically, we adopted: new
operational requirements for Access BPL to promote avoidance and
resolution of harmful interference; new administrative requirements to
aid in identifying Access BPL installations; and specific measurement
guidelines and certification requirements to ensure accurate and
repeatable evaluations of emissions from Access BPL and all other
carrier current systems. We believe these actions will promote the
development of BPL systems by removing regulatory uncertainties for BPL
operators and equipment manufacturers while ensuring that licensed
radio services are protected from harmful interference.

Part 15--Existing Rules

3. Carrier current systems use alternating current (AC) electric
power lines to carry communications by coupling very low power RF
signals onto the AC electric wiring. Traditionally, these systems have
included amplitude modulated (AM) radio systems on school campuses and
devices intended for the home, such as intercom systems and remote
controls for electrical appliances and lamps. Carrier current systems
operate on an unlicensed basis under part 15 of the Commission's rules.
As a general condition of operation, part 15 devices may not cause
harmful interference to authorized radio services and must accept any
interference that they receive.
4. The part 15 rules for carrier current systems currently specify
radiated and conducted emission limits for devices operating below 30
MHz and above 30 MHz. Carrier current systems operating from 9 kHz to
30 MHz are subject to radiated emission limits on emissions from any
part of the wiring or power network connected to the RF power source.
For carrier current systems that contain their fundamental emission
within the standard AM broadcast band of 535 to 1705 kHz and are
intended to be received using standard AM broadcast receivers, there is
no limit on conducted emissions. All other carrier current systems
operating below 30 MHz are subject to a conducted emission limit only
within the AM broadcast band. Carrier current devices operating above
30 MHz must meet the radiated emission limits of Sec. 15.109(a), (b)
or (g) for digital devices, which are further divided into two types.
Class A equipment includes devices marketed for use in a commercial,
industrial or business environment, excluding devices which are
marketed for use by the general public or are intended to be used in
the home. Class B equipment includes devices marketed for use in a
residential environment, notwithstanding use in commercial, business
and industrial environments. The rules require Access BPL systems to
comply with the limits for Class A or B devices depending on whether
they are marketed for use in a commercial, industrial or business
environment on the one hand or for use by the general public or in the
home on the other. Under this Class A/Class B regime, Access BPL
systems that operate on medium voltage lines external to residential
environments are considered Class A devices. Carrier current devices
that do not operate on frequencies below 30 MHz are subject to the
general conducted emission limits below 30 MHz. The existing part 15
rules also address power line carrier systems, which are low-speed
carrier current systems operating between 10 kHz and 490 kHz, used by
an electric public utility entity for protective relaying, telemetry,
etc., for general supervision of the power system. Because of their
specialized use and operating frequency range, power line carrier
systems are not subject to specific emission limits as are general
carrier current systems.
5. The Commission believes that the widespread introduction of
Access BPL service would further our goals for broadband service
consistent with the challenges indicated. This new

[[Page 1362]]

technology offers the potential to give rise to a major new medium for
broadband service delivery. Services provided on Access BPL could offer
high speed Internet and data communications that compete with,
complement, or extend the broadband services provided on existing
media. Given the ubiquitous nature of the electric power network,
Access BPL could conceivably also offer these services to virtually
every element of the broadband market, including residential,
institutional, and commercial users. In addition, it is possible that
Access BPL could provide a means to expedite the availability of
broadband Internet service to consumers and business in rural and other
underserved areas. We also find that encouraging the deployment of the
technology in the United States will support globalization of products
and services, promote continued U.S. leadership in broadband
technology, and bring important benefits to the American public.
6. The Commission understand the significant concerns of licensed
radio service users about the potential for Access BPL services to
cause harmful interference to their operations. It is our intention to
ensure that Access BPL operations do not become a source of harmful
interference to licensed radio services. Based on extensive research,
analyses, and practical experience, the Commission also continues to
believe that the interference concerns of licensed radio users can be
adequately addressed and that Access BPL systems will be able to
operate successfully on an unlicensed, non-harmful interference basis
under the part 15 model. In this regard, we find that the harmful
interference potential from Access BPL systems operating in compliance
with the existing part 15 emission limits for carrier current systems
is low in connection with the additional rules we adopted. From the
information provided by our field tests, the tests conducted by NTIA,
theoretical predictions by NTIA and ARRL, and experience of the several
tests of Access BPL systems, we observe that the potential for any
harmful interference is limited to areas within a short distance of the
power lines used by this technology. As emphasized by NTIA's Phase 1
study and comments, interference can be rapidly eliminated through
various means should it occur. We pointed out to the individual
amateurs commenting in this proceeding that the definition of ``harmful
interference'' as used in Sec. 15.5 of the rules is set forth in Sec.
2.1 of the rules. We disagree with ARRL's position that there is no
reason to act now in this proceeding and that we should delay our
decision on rules for Access BPL to provide more time to develop rules
to prevent this technology from causing harmful interference. As
indicated, the broadband service capabilities of Access BPL systems
offer important opportunities for establishing a new medium for
broadband access and for introducing new competition in the broadband
market. We believe that it is important to set forth rules that will
promote this service now, rather than delay. In addition, the record
provided in response to the Inquiry and the NPRM, including the
extensive studies conducted by NTIA, is more than sufficient to assure
us that the rules we adopted will adequately protect licensed services
from harmful interference. While some cases of harmful interference may
be possible from Access BPL emissions at levels up to the part 15
limits, we agree with NTIA that the benefits of Access BPL service
warrant acceptance of a small and manageable degree of interference
risk.
7. As stated in the NPRM, we believe that, on balance, the benefits
of Access BPL for bringing broadband services to the public are
sufficiently important and significant so as to outweigh the limited
potential for increased harmful interference that may arise. Moreover,
the Commission continue to believe that cases where interference may
occur or where its possible occurrence would impact critical services
can be addressed through additional regulatory measures. These
additional measures will generally require Access BPL operators to
reduce emissions or avoid operation on certain frequencies in order to
protect licensed services, to use equipment that can alter its
operation by changing operating frequencies to eliminate interference,
to make available information that will assist the public in
identifying locations where Access BPL operations are present, and to
provide notice to radio users before commencing local BPL operations.
In this way, the new rules provide effective means for preventing any
interference and will ensure that any instances of interference that
may occur can be quickly identified and resolved. We emphasize that
Access BPL systems will continue be treated as unlicensed part 15
devices and as such will be subject to the conditions that they not
cause harmful interference and that they cease operation if they do
cause such interference, as required by our rules. As discussed in
paragraph 50, of the Report and Order, except for a few specific
frequencies that are reserved for international aeronautical safety
operations, we do not believe that excluding BPL operations from
frequencies used by any specific service, such as the low VHF TV bands,
is necessary or appropriate. Rather, we believe requiring BPL equipment
to have the capability to avoid any locally used frequency is the most
effective approach to ensuring that harmful interference to licensed
operations is avoided.
8. The Commission is amending its part 15 rules with changes
intended to facilitate the deployment of Access BPL technology while
protecting licensed users of the spectrum. Specifically, we a
defining Access BPL for purposes of our rules; maintaining the existing
part 15 emission limits for carrier current systems for Access BPL;
requiring that Access BPL devices employ adaptive interference
mitigation techniques; requiring that Access BPL system operators
provide information on the areas where their systems are installed and
other technical parameters in a central data base that would be
accessible by the public; and adopting specific measurement guidelines
for both Access BPL and other carrier current systems to ensure that
measurements are made in a consistent manner and provide for repeatable
results in determining compliance with our rules.

Definition of Access BPL

9. The Commission adopted a modified version of the proposed
definition of Access BPL that includes changes as suggested by the
commenting parties. In this regard, we agree that the definition of
Access BPL should not include the low-speed power line carrier systems
used by electric utilities as defined in our rules. Transmissions on
these systems have very short duty cycles that pose very low
interference potential as opposed to the constant operation that
characterizes Access BPL. We also agree that the definition for Access
BPL should limit the low frequency cut-off to above 1.705 MHz, which is
the upper frequency for the AM broadcast band. We agree that the
definition for Access BPL should not include power lines located within
a customer's premises or within a utility's own premises. These lines
generally carry low voltage power, are not under the ownership or
integral control of the power service operator, are isolated from the
medium voltage lines by a distribution transformer such that a bypass
device must be used to reach them with BPL signals, and pose lower
potential as sources of interference because their emissions are
attenuated

[[Page 1363]]

by the structure in which they are located. We also see no need to
limit ownership or control of BPL operations to electric utility
operators. We believe that an independent BPL provider can take the
same steps and precautions as an electric utility operator in working
with its equipment vendor, the power system, and licensed radio users
to ensure that an Access BPL system does not cause harmful interference
and to resolve any interference. We also see no need to specifically
mention aerial or underground lines in the definition. Furthermore, we
note that the record in this proceeding only addresses Access BPL
systems operating over medium voltage and low voltage lines. Because
the high voltage lines are located physically higher, can carry very
high voltages, and have different configurations as well as
characteristics with respect to potential harmful interference, we are
excluding them from the definition for Access BPL at this time. Access
BPL systems intended for high voltage lines can however operate under
the requirements for experimental licensing in part 5 of the Commission
rules.
10. We therefore are amending Sec. 15.3 of the rules to include
the following definition for Access BPL:

Access Broadband Over Power Line (Access BPL). A carrier current
system installed and operated on an electric utility service as an
unintentional radiator that sends radio frequency energy on
frequencies between 1.705 MHz and 80 MHz over medium voltage lines
or low voltage lines to provide broadband communications and is
located on the supply side of the utility service's points of
interconnection with customer premises. Access BPL does not include
power line carrier systems as defined in Sec. 15.3(t) of this part
or In-House BPL systems as defined in Sec. 15.3(gg) of this part.

11. While we are not generally addressing rules for In-House BPL
systems, except for measurement procedures, we do find it useful and
appropriate to set forth a definition of such systems in the rules. As
NTIA and Southern point out, specifying a definition of In-House BPL
systems will fully define all forms of BPL and help to clarify the
differences between Access BPL and In-House systems. We find that the
definition of In-House BPL suggested by NTIA properly identifies these
systems. Accordingly, we adopted the following definition for In-House
BPL:

In-House Broadband Over Power Line (In-House BPL). A carrier
current system, operating as an unintentional radiator, that sends
radio frequency energy to provide broadband communications on
frequencies between 1.705 MHz and 80 MHz over low-voltage electric
power lines that are not owned, operated or controlled by an
electric service provider. The electric power lines may be aerial
(overhead), underground, or inside walls, floors or ceilings of user
premises. In-House BPL devices may establish closed networks within
a user's premises or provide connections to Access BPL (as defined
in Sec. 15.3(ff) of this part) networks, or both.

We also encourage industry efforts to develop standards for In-
House BPL systems and devices that are complementary to and compatible
with Access BPL operations.
12. Access BPL Systems Above 80 MHz. We agree with Corridor that
Access BPL systems operating in higher regions of the spectrum, such as
the Corridor Access BPL system at 5.8 GHz, should not be subject to the
rules adopted herein for Access BPL systems operating in the HF and low
VHF spectrum. We find that the record in this proceeding does not
provide sufficient information regarding Access BPL operating in
spectrum above 80 MHz, hence a decision regarding this type of Access
BPL technology cannot be effectively rendered at the present time;
however, Access BPL systems not covered in the above definition are
subject to existing applicable part 15 rules for carrier current
systems. However, we will monitor the development of Access BPL systems
that operate on frequencies above 80 MHz and may consider additional
requirements for Access BPL systems operating above 80 MHz in a future
rulemaking if appropriate.

Emission Limits

13. General Emission Limits. The Commission continues to believe
that it is appropriate to apply the existing part 15 radiated emission
limits to Access BPL systems. We are not persuaded by the arguments of
ARRL and others representing licensed spectrum users that the current
emission limits are insufficient to limit the general interference
potential of these systems. The 0 dB[mu]V/m limit suggested by the ARRL
is typically below the noise floor in the HF and low VHF bands and
would be unnecessarily and prohibitively restrictive for Access BPL
operators. Along with NTIA, we conclude that the current emission
limits will restrict Access BPL systems to very low emitted power
levels in comparison to the signals of licensed radio operations. The
effect of these limits will be to constrain the harmful interference
potential of these systems to relatively short distances from the power
lines that they occupy. In fact, in most cases the level of emissions
from Access BPL systems will be at or close to the noise floor at
distances beyond a hundred meters of an installed power line. We
recognize that some radio operations in the bands being used for Access
BPL, such as those of Amateur radio licensees, may occur at distances
sufficiently close to power lines as to make harmful interference a
possibility. We believe that those situations can be addressed through
interference avoidance techniques by the Access BPL provider such as
frequency band selection, notching, or judicious device placement; the
rules we are specifying facilitate such solutions. We do not see
evidence that BPL operation will significantly contribute RF energy to
generally raise the background noise level. In addition, because power
lines inherently can radiate significant noise emissions as noted by
NTIA and ARRL, good engineering practice is to locate sensitive
receiver antennas as far as practicable from power lines. This practice
will also help prevent interference from Access BPL emissions. In fact,
as stated by NTIA, power line noise emissions at frequencies up to 800
MHz may actually be reduced as Access BPL systems are deployed.
Furthermore, we see no need to impose a strict band-pass filtering on
Access BPL, and we deny Echelon's request in this regard.
14. Although we agree with ARRL that Access BPL on overhead lines
is not a traditional point-source emitter, we do not believe that
Access BPL devices will cause the power lines to act as countless miles
of transmission lines all radiating RF energy along their full length.
First, the part 15 emission limits for carrier current systems have
proven very effective at controlling interference from such systems.
Also, for the reasons indicated by PPL Telcom, we believe that the
design and configuration of Access BPL systems will be inconsistent
with the development of cumulative emissions effects for nearby
receivers. Moreover, the NTIA Phase 1 Study and our own field
measurements of Access BPL installations indicate that these systems
are not efficient radiators, nor are their emissions cumulative such
that they permeate areas in which they are located. Rather, we find
that emissions from Access BPL systems tend to dissipate after a short
distance from a coupler along a line, and then remain relatively the
same for some distance. Along the line there also may be multiple
points where emissions may be relatively higher but within the part 15
limits. However, because the signal level decreases significantly with
distance perpendicular from the line, the potential for interference
also decays

[[Page 1364]]

rapidly with distance from the line. To ensure that the effects of the
power line as a radiator are taken into consideration when testing for
compliance with our part 15 rules, the measurement procedures we
adopted for Access BPL systems, as discussed in the Report and Order,
specify that emission measurements are to be made at several specific
distances from the Access BPL equipment source, and that measurements
are to be taken parallel to the power line to find the maximum
emissions from the BPL system.
15. Notwithstanding our decision on emission limits, we do
recognize that Access BPL systems present concerns for licensed users
in the HF and low VHF bands, given the propagation characteristics of
RF signals in the range of frequencies being used for these systems,
the diversity of users of these frequencies, and the fact that Access
BPL devices will be installed at many locations in an area. While we
conclude, that the likelihood that interference from Access BPL
operations will occur is low at the signal levels allowed under the
current part 15 emission limits, such interference could occur in
limited situations despite the intentions of BPL operators. Moreover,
even if interference were to occur to amateur operations at the
distances indicated by the ARRL, as recommended by NTIA, there are
additional interference mitigation techniques that we are requiring of
BPL providers to address such interference potential. We believe that
such steps should be taken, particularly in those cases where the
occurrence of interference would affect critical services or where
interference could be anticipated to occur.
16. We find no need to subject Access BPL equipment to a conducted
emission limit that would apply for compliance measurement purposes
before the equipment is shipped and installed. We note that Access BPL
manufacturers already test their equipment for the proper power levels
in a laboratory as part of their manufacturing procedures, and in any
case, the radiated emissions from a representative model of equipment
would be measured in-situ at three sites as part of the equipment
authorization process. We therefore find that requiring conducted
emission tests in the laboratory would be a redundant and unnecessary
procedure.
17. The Class A limits are appropriate because Access BPL devices
are not marketed to the general public and operate on the medium
voltage power lines as commercial facilities. Those portions of Access
BPL systems that operate above 30 MHz on the low-voltage power lines
from the distribution transformer to a residence and all in-house
wiring connected to a BPL device are subject to Class B radiated
emission limits. The Class B limits are appropriate for these
operations because they are located within residential environments and
are marketed for use by the general public. Although Access BPL systems
are required to comply with the less stringent Class A limits,
operators will nonetheless have a strong incentive to exercise the
utmost caution in installing and operating their systems to avoid
harmful interference and ensure uninterrupted service to their
customers, given that there is significant investment in the deployment
of the service. We do not find that a 10 dB increase in the allowable
emissions levels is warranted or desirable for systems that can reduce
emissions by 40 dB in selected bands, as suggested by Satius. We
believe that it is important that Access BPL systems comply with the
emission limits across their entire operating range in order to
minimize the potential for interference in all bands, not just those
where interference may be more likely at a particular location.
18. Other Protection Measures. We agree with NTIA and the parties
representing public safety agencies that critical Federal Government
and other services specified by NTIA and public safety warrant
additional protection. These services, including national defense,
maritime distress and safety, aeronautical navigation and
communications, emergency response, radioastronomy, and others provide
important safety and research services whose functions would be
afforded additional protection against possible interference from
Access BPL operations. We agree with and adopted NTIA's approach for
addressing additional protection to critical Federal Government and
other radio operations. The excluded frequency bands amount only to a
total of 1731 kHz, or 2% of the spectrum within the 1.7-80 MHz band.
The exclusion zones are relatively few, on only the 2173.5 to 2190.5
kHz global maritime distress signaling band with prohibited distances
of 1 km from coast station facilities, and 73.0-74.6 MHz band used by
the ten Very Long Baseline Array facilities of radio astronomy
observatories with prohibited distances of 29 km and 11 km for Access
BPL systems using overhead medium voltage power lines and other Access
BPL implementations, respectively. We agree with NTIA that the
potential for interference from Access BPL to the critical services in
exclusion zones is somewhat greater for transmissions carried on
overhead medium voltage lines than other Access BPL implementations,
i.e., transmissions carried on underground lines or low voltage lines.
In this regard, emissions from underground power lines are generally
attenuated by the earth materials in which they are buried, while
emissions from low voltage lines are generally lower because such lines
are generally used only for short feeder links from a transformer to a
customer service location and these lines are more closely spaced with
an accompanying neutral line--and in fact are often twisted together
with the neutral line. The close spacing--together with the shorter
length--reduces radiated RF emissions relative to those from overhead
medium voltage lines. In addition, the requirement to contact and work
with the Federal Government in the 53 consultation areas is not
generally expected to result in major impact on Access BPL operators'
flexibility to use specific frequency bands. We therefore find that
avoiding operation on the frequencies excluded under these restrictions
and requirements will not be burdensome for Access BPL operators and
manufacturers in order to protect distress and safety communications.
Indeed, several manufacturers and Access BPL operators have indicated
that they are capable of, and already do, notch out certain frequency
bands. We disagree with Ameren, PLCA, and Southern that the mandatory
consultation provisions imposed on Access BPL operators impose burdens
on Access BPL operators not borne by other unlicensed broadband
operators without countervailing benefits. For example, in part 76, we
require that cable operators conduct measurements annually to ensure
that signal leakage does not create interference risks. Moreover, the
distributive nature and other technical characteristics of Access BPL
pose somewhat higher potential for interference than point-source
wireless broadband systems that warrant additional protective measures.
In addition, the consultation actions will benefit Access BPL operators
by leading them to select frequencies at the beginning of their service
so as to avoid interference to critical services that might have to be
corrected later. Accordingly, we adopted NTIA's list of consultation
areas, excluded bands, and exclusion zones to which Access BPL
equipment must adhere. For all other radio communication operations not
addressed in these special provisions, radio operators have the
opportunity to inform local BPL operators of the

[[Page 1365]]

pertinent details of their operations and BPL operators have the
opportunity to apply that information as appropriate to prevent
interference.
19. With regard to the consultation areas, we will require Access
BPL operators to provide notification to the parties listed as Federal
Government contact points, as designated in the rules, for the area in
which their systems will operate at least 30 days prior to initiation
of service. The notification shall include: the name of the Access BPL
provider; the frequencies of the Access BPL operation; the postal zip
codes served by the Access BPL operation; the manufacturer of and type
of Access BPL equipment being deployed (i.e., FCC ID); point of contact
information (both telephone and e-mail address); and the proposed or
actual date of initiation of Access BPL operation. We will also require
that systems located in consultation areas that were in operation prior
to the effective date of these rules provide this notice to the
appropriate contact point within 45 days of that date. NTIA has
indicated that it plans to arrange to have information made available
to BPL operators on Federal Government operations. We expect parties to
consult in good faith to ensure that no harmful interference is caused
to licensed operations and that any constraints on BPL deployments are
minimized to those necessary to avoid harmful interference.
20. As indicated in the NPRM, we believe that the risk of harmful
interference to State and local public safety services, i.e., EMS,
fire, law enforcement, and emergency management agencies from Access
BPL operations is essentially low. In general, we believe that a
properly designed and operated Access BPL system will pose little
interference hazard to services such as aeronautical, maritime and
public safety that are designed to operate with relatively high signal-
to-noise ratios. In analyzing the potential for harmful interference to
public safety systems, we took into account the fact that low-level
part 15 signals from Access BPL devices attenuate rapidly as the
distance from the power line increases; and that most public safety
systems are designed so that mobile and portable units receive a signal
level significantly above the noise floor. From an interference
analysis standpoint, this latter characteristic distinguishes public
safety systems from amateur radio stations using high-sensitivity
receivers to receive signals from transmitters often thousands of miles
away. However, it is foreseeable that under certain rare circumstances
a public safety unit could: (a) Operate in close proximity to a power
line carrying Access BPL transmissions at a location where field
strength is near the part 15 limit; (b) be tuned to a frequency
radiated by an Access BPL device; and (c) be receiving a weak signal
from a distant, or obstructed, public safety base station. In general,
potential harmful interference under these conditions would be limited
to public safety units operating on systems using low-band VHF channels
(25-50 MHz). We therefore conclude that the interference protections
set forth will be adequate to foreclose harmful interference to public
safety systems except perhaps under such unusual circumstances.
21. However, we also conclude that public safety systems merit
additional protection because of the often critical and/or safety-of-
life nature of the communications they provide. Given the importance
and nature of public safety communications, we believe it is necessary
to require Access BPL systems to notify the public safety agencies in
their local areas, i.e., State and local police, fire, emergency
medical, any special emergency coordinators, call box operators, and
other entities that are eligible for public safety licenses under Sec.
90.20 of the rules. This advance notification will provide public
safety operators with an opportunity to assess whether there are
portions of its geographic area of responsibility about which it should
make special arrangements with the Access BPL operator in order to
avoid interference. Consistent with our decision on notifications for
Federal Government consultation areas, we will require that this
notification be provided to local public safety agencies at least 30
days prior to a system's initial operation, the activation of any major
extensions of the system, or any changes in its operating
characteristics, i.e., transmitting frequencies. The notification shall
include: (1) The name of the Access BPL provider, (2) the frequencies
of the Access BPL operation, (3) the postal zip codes served by the
Access BPL operation, (4) the manufacturer of and type of Access BPL
equipment being deployed (i.e., FCC ID), (5) point of contact
information (both telephone and e-mail address), and (6) the proposed
or actual date of initiation of Access BPL operation. We will also
require that systems in operation prior to the effective date of these
rules provide this notice to local public safety agencies within 45
days of that date.
22. We do not see a need to establish Access BPL-free zones around
airports, military bases, hospitals, police stations and fire stations,
as requested by NAC/Amherst. To the extent that these services warrant
special protection, they will be afforded protection through the
excluded bands, exclusion zones and consultation areas specified by
NTIA. We similarly do not find that amateur radio frequencies warrant
the special protection afforded frequencies reserved for international
aeronautical and maritime safety operations. We note that in many
instances amateur frequencies are used for routine communications and
hobby activities. While we recognize that amateurs may on occasion
assist in providing emergency communications, we believe that the
general part 15 provisions and the specific provisions being adopted
for Access BPL operations are sufficient to protect these amateur
operations.

Interference Mitigation

23. We continue to believe that it is important that Access BPL
systems include capabilities that allow them to modify their operations
to mitigate or avoid instances of harmful interference that may arise.
These capabilities will allow Access BPL system operators to resolve
interference found to occur at specific locations or in specific areas
of their plant in an expeditious manner and without disrupting service
to their broadband service subscribers. We agree with NTIA that Access
BPL operators would have strong incentives to voluntarily implement
such equipment and operating practices. We also agree with NTIA that,
notwithstanding these incentives, it is necessary that we adopt
requirements for interference mitigation capabilities to ensure that
any interference can be resolved quickly without the need to address
the tension that might arise over the possible disruption of service to
BPL subscribers if mitigation capabilities were not available. The
concerns of those commenting parties who argue that the mitigation
requirements would not be sufficient to protect their operations from
interference by BPL operations are misplaced. That protection will be
provided by: (1) The emissions limits for Access BPL systems; (2) the
provisions for consultation areas, excluded bands, and exclusion zones;
and (3) the requirement that Access BPL systems not cause interference,
as set forth above. The mitigation requirements are intended to ensure
that Access BPL systems are designed with features that support
interference mitigation, both during initial installation, if sensitive
local communications systems are identified in advance, and after
installation, when the newly required operational

[[Page 1366]]

capabilities will allow Access BPL system operators to expeditiously
resolve any instances of interference that may occur, without the need
to cease operations and thereby disrupt the broadband data services
they provide to their subscribers.
24. Accordingly, we have adopted requirements that Access BPL
systems incorporate capabilities to modify their systems' operations
and performance to mitigate or avoid potential harmful interference to
radio services and to deactivate specific units found to actually cause
harmful interference that cannot be remedied through modification of
their operations as proposed, but with certain modifications. Our
approach in specifying these requirements is to provide Access BPL
equipment manufacturers and operators with flexibility to design and
implement a broad range of products and system designs to meet
particular service and operational needs while ensuring that systems
have the capabilities to make operational changes to avoid any
interference that may arise. The specific provisions of the mitigation
requirements and the comments that concern them are addressed below. We
also see no basis for subjecting Access BPL systems to requirements for
addressing interference complaints that are different and more
stringent than our procedures for addressing interference from other
types of unlicensed devices. In this regard, we will continue to
subject Access BPL systems to the procedures of Sec. 15.5(c) of the
rules. Under this rule, parties who believe they are experiencing
interference from an unlicensed device are first expected to bring the
matter to the attention of the operator of the unlicensed device. If
that action does not resolve the interference, the party may then seek
intervention by the Commission.
25. To be more specific, in the event a BPL interference complaint
is filed by a licensee with the Commission, the Commission will contact
the complainant and/or the BPL provider to determine if they have first
attempted to resolve the interference complaint among themselves. If
they have not made such an attempt, the complaint will be forwarded to
the BPL provider for action and the complainant notified that they will
be contacted by the BPL provider concerning their interference
complaint. The Commission may periodically monitor the resolution
process to ensure that the parties are working in good faith and making
appropriate progress in resolving the interference complaint. If the
parties have attempted to address the complaint but the matter remains
unresolved, the Commission, through its Enforcement Bureau with
assistance from the Office of Engineering and Technology will review
the complaint and take appropriate action. In general, the Commission
will contact the BPL operator and request information on what steps
they have taken to address the licensee's complaint. If these actions
are deemed insufficient to resolve the interference complaint, the
Commission will instruct the BPL operator to take immediate remedial
actions, such as ``notching'' or avoiding specific frequencies, or
ceasing operations. In specific instances, the Commission may undertake
field testing and measurements to address interference complaints and
determine the most appropriate remedial action.
26. Frequency Avoidance. We conclude that the most appropriate
approach regarding mitigation techniques that involve altering system
operation is to require that Access BPL systems incorporate the
capability to avoid the use of specific frequency bands. The ability to
alter a system's operation to notch-out transmissions from specific
frequencies where interference is occurring is a necessary feature for
resolving interference without disrupting service to BPL subscribers.
While other mitigation capabilities, such as adaptive or commanded
power control, are desirable system features that can serve to reduce
interference potential, they generally would provide a much lower
degree of benefit in eliminating interference than frequency avoidance.
Limiting the requirement for operational modification capabilities to
frequency avoidance is also consistent with our intent to minimize the
impact of these requirements on manufacturers and system operators so
as preserve their flexibility to design products and systems that will
best meet the needs of Access BPL subscribers.
27. In considering specifications for the notching requirement, we
find that the most important consideration is to ensure that the notch
provides enough filtering to effectively reduce the potential for
interference. Our experience in examining the field performance of
various Access BPL operations indicates that at frequencies below 30
MHz, a notching capability that provides at least a 20 dB reduction of
Access BPL emissions below the current applicable part 15 emission
limits is adequate to resolve interference occurrences that might
result to mobile reception from such operations. In this regard, we
will generally assume that a 20 dB notch is sufficient to resolve any
harmful interference that might occur to mobile operations, given the
low signal levels allowed under the part 15 emission limits and the
fact that a mobile transceiver can readily be re-positioned to provide
some separation from the Access BPL operation. The interference
potential from emissions at this low level would be limited to a very
short range from an Access BPL device or a power line on which Access
BPL transmissions are carried. We also believe that notching at this
level with some distance separation will generally avoid interference
to fixed operations, including those that use more sensitive receivers.
Above 30 MHz we believe that a notching capability of at least 10 dB is
sufficient to provide the same level of protection, given the more
stringent part 15 emission limits that apply to Access BPL
transmissions above 30 MHz and the increased attenuation of emissions
that occurs from propagation losses as the frequency of operation
increases. With regard to NAS/CORF's requests for protection of
radioastronomy, we note that special protections are provided for
radioastronomy in the exclusion zones and consultation requirements for
Access BPL.
28. We do not believe it is necessary to specify the bandwidth over
which the notching capability must function. Rather, we will adopt the
more general requirement that Access BPL systems must be capable of
avoiding transmissions in any frequency band or bands in order to
eliminate any instances of interference with the operations of licensed
radio services. We therefore are amending our rules to require that
Access BPL devices have the capability to reduce emissions by at least
20 dB below the part 15 emission limits in frequency bands below 30 MHz
and 10 dB below those limits in frequency bands 30 MHz and above. We
believe that these provisions adequately set forth the structure of the
required capabilities for modifying the operation of an Access BPL
system. We are not specifying requirements for use of the frequency
avoidance capabilities. Rather, we believe that system operators should
have the discretion to use this capability or any other alternative
available to them as they might deem appropriate to resolve specific
situations involving interference that they may encounter in the course
of their operations.
29. We do not find any justification for a requirement that Access
BPL operators notch the frequencies of any or all of those services
that use frequencies in the HF and low VHF

[[Page 1367]]

bands. We believe that the emission limits, consultation areas,
excluded bands, exclusion zones, and the requirement that Access BPL
systems not cause interference, are generally sufficient to control the
interference potential of these systems. The required notching
capability will enable a system operator to address any specific
instances of interference that might otherwise arise. We also decline
to adopt a rule requiring transmission of identification codes. As NTIA
states, such codes could increase the potential for interference from
Access BPL operations. We also do not believe that it would be
practicable for ARINC or any other operator to identify an Access BPL
system as the source of interference and contact its operator on a real
time basis to resolve the interference. As NTIA indicates in its letter
of September 24, 2004, no practical method has been identified for
Access BPL systems to transmit an identifying code. We believe that the
Access BPL notification requirements will provide sufficient
information to locate and mitigate interference.
30. Shut Down Requirement. We continue to believe that Access BPL
equipment and systems should have the capability to deactivate
individual system components. This feature will allow systems to
deactivate limited portions of their plant so that localized
interference problems can be addressed without affecting service to all
of their subscribers. As a secondary benefit, the shut-down feature
will allow system operators to rapidly diagnose whether their
operations are causing reported interference. We are also requiring
that the shut-down feature in individual devices be remote-controllable
from the central system operations facility or other appropriate
location. This will allow rapid response to resolve interference in any
emergency or other urgent situation that might arise. We also agree
with Progress Energy the required shut-down capability should be
manually controlled. Moreover, we have no record on which to base a
decision on the conditions under which an automated capability would be
activated. We also recognize that, depending on how it would be
triggered, an automated shut-down capability could unnecessarily have
detrimental effects on a power utility service's operations in addition
to disrupting broadband service to its Access BPL customers.
31. It is not our intention that a service shut-down be the first
step in a system operator's response to a valid interference complaint.
As suggested by several of the commenting parties, we would anticipate
that shut-down would be a last resort when all other efforts to
satisfactorily reduce interference have failed. We disagree with Ameren
that the shut-down requirement will add unnecessary costs and
complexity to Access BPL equipment. As NTIA and our own field testing
indicate, most Access BPL systems and equipment already include the
capability to shut down specific components of their operation.
Accordingly, we are requiring that Access BPL systems incorporate
features that will allow the deactivation of individual components on a
remote-controlled basis, to be implemented. We reiterate, however, that
the Commission, through a duly authorized representative, is the sole
authority that may direct an Access BPL operator to cease operating any
of its devices to eliminate interference.

Access BPL Notification and Database Requirements

32. We believe that the Access BPL notification and database
requirements proposed in the NPRM are appropriate and sufficient to
ensure that any potential interference to licensed services from BPL
operations can be adequately identified and quickly addressed. The
primary intent of our notification and database requirements is to
ensure that licensed users of the spectrum have a publicly accessible
and centralized source of information on BPL operations to determine
whether there may be Access BPL operations on particular frequencies
within their local area so that any incident of harmful interference
can be resolved should it occur. The information contained in the
notification database need only be sufficient to determine whether
there may be a BPL operation in the local area, the nature of the BPL
operations, whether the BPL system is operating on frequencies that
could potentially be a source of harmful interference to the licensed
user and to identify an appropriate contact person who can work
directly with the complainant to resolve the harmful interference if it
is determined to be caused by the local BPL operations. Additional or
more detailed relevant information needed by a radio operator could be
requested via the contact person indicated in the data base, as
appropriate.
33. We therefore are adopting rules that will require the BPL
industry to establish within July 6, 2005, a centralized publicly
accessible Access BPL notification database. We note that two
organizations have indicated their willingness to perform this task and
that the issue of ``independence'' of the database manager has been
raised by some of the commenting parties. The responsibilities and
duties of the database manager are to maintain complete, accurate and
timely records of FCC-mandated information. We are not requiring, as
some parties have suggested, that the database manager be involved in,
monitor, or manage the interference resolution process. The party
responsible for avoiding interference is clearly the Access BPL
operator and his responsibilities are clearly set forth in the existing
procedures under Sec. 15.5(c) of the Commission rules. We therefore do
not find that the database manager need be an ``independent'' third-
party with no relationship to the BPL or utility industry and are not
adopting such a requirement.
34. With regard to the information to be included in the database,
we adopted rules that will require the Access BPL operator to provide
the BPL industry designated database manager with the following
information 30 days prior to initiation of any operation or service:
(1) The name of the Access BPL provider; (2) the frequencies of the
Access BPL operation; (3) the postal zip codes served by the specific
Access BPL operation; (4) the manufacturer and type of Access BPL
equipment being deployed (i.e., FCC ID); (5) point of contact
information (both telephone and e-mail address) for interference
inquiries and resolution; and (6) the proposed/or actual date of Access
BPL operation. The database manager shall be required to enter this
information into the publicly accessible database within 3 business
days of receipt. This will allow some period of time for the database
manager and BPL provider to address any questions with regard to
information submitted and to ensure that information entered into the
database is correct. We believe that the above information provides
sufficient specificity for identifying potential interference while at
the same time avoiding valid concerns that sensitive information on
critical infrastructure not be revealed.
35. We believe that using zip codes, as suggested by Southern,
would sufficiently identify the area of Access BPL deployment without
revealing specific sensitive information and would facilitate a more
organized approach to identification and resolution of harmful
interference. We note that zip codes are easily understood and can be
identified by both licensees and BPL operators. With regard to those
parties that request more comprehensive information, we do not find
that benefits of providing such information in the database would

[[Page 1368]]

outweigh the substantial cost of collecting and reporting this
additional information. We note, for example, that NTIA's proposals to
require information on modulation types, number of carriers, range of
transmission duty cycle, minimum and maximum carrier spacing, symbol
rates per carrier, etc., would provide little additional guidance on
whether interference were being caused in a particular instance as
compared to the more simple requirement of identifying BPL operating
frequencies. In addition, we are requiring that BPL equipment must be
certified and therefore more detailed technical information will be
available through our equipment authorization files for those parties
desiring such information. We also are not requiring Access BPL
operators to have multi-lingual contact persons. We believe that
requiring both telephone and e-mail contact information is sufficient
to address interference inquiries. We are also not requiring that
telephone contact positions be staffed 24 hours per day and seven days
a week. We believe that our emission requirements and other mitigation
rules will ensure that interference is generally avoided. We believe
that telephone contact staffing during normal business hours is
sufficient and also note that e-mail would generally allow interference
reports to be filed at any time.
36. We expect the Access BPL operators and licensees to cooperate
in good faith to identify and resolve instances of harmful
interference. We require the notification database for Access BPL
operators to notify the operation of its devices and systems to
facilitate the speedy resolution of interference. Speedy resolution of
interference will not result if the database information on Access BPL
deployments is abused and the BPL operators are deluged with frivolous
interference complaints. We expect the Access BPL operators to take
every complaint of interference seriously and to diagnose the possible
cause of interference quickly. At the same time, we expect the
complainant to have first taken reasonable steps to confirm that
interference rather than a receiver system malfunction is occurring
and, to the extent practicable, to determine that the interference
source is located outside the complainant's premises. We expect both
parties to cooperate to determine a mutually acceptable schedule to
diagnose and resolve the interference complaint, recognizing that the
Access BPL operator may have to prioritize any complaints of
interference that it receives (e.g., from a public safety agency). With
regard to public safety operations, however, we will require that the
BPL operator respond to complaints of harmful interference from public
safety users within 24 hours; the BPL provider shall be required to
immediately cease the operations causing the public safety complaint if
it fails to respond to such complaint within 24 hours. Any complaints
of interference that are not resolved in accordance with the mutually
agreed schedule may be filed with the Commission along with the
particulars of the interference case. Upon receipt of the interference
complaint, the Commission will investigate the complaint and take
action against the Access BPL operator if it is found to be causing
harmful interference. If, on the other hand the Commission uses its
resources to investigate an interference complaint that is found to be
frivolous, the Commission will impose appropriate sanctions for abuse
of its administrative process.

Measurement Guidelines

Access BPL Systems

37. We find the extensive measurement and modeling efforts
presented in the NTIA Phase 1 Study and the Technical Appendix to
NTIA's comments to be highly useful in our efforts to develop
appropriate measurement procedures for Access BPL. The scientific
engineering in those submissions clarifies the interference potential
of Access BPL on radio reception and the recommended techniques for
measurement of Access BPL emissions provide us with a well thought-out
plan on which to base our decisions on measurement issues. Our
decision, takes into account NTIA's research and adopts a modified
version of its recommendations.
38. We find that our proposed measurement procedure for testing
Access BPL systems including the presence and testing of all of their
electronic components to be reasonable as each component is part of the
Access system of that installation. We do not agree with Southern that
the testing should be limited to three representative signal injection
points. Southern believes that the highest levels of emissions on
overhead systems are found at the signal injection point, and it states
that the biggest variable affecting emissions is impedance mismatch
between the signal injection system and the power system at the point
of injection, which could be a coupler or a repeater. We agree with
Southern that each injection point affects the radiated emissions.
However, Southern's suggestion of selecting only representative signal
injection points precludes the presence of other components, e.g.,
booster, concentrator, extractor, etc. if they should be together at an
installation to make up the complete Access BPL system. Our requirement
for a typical installation takes into account the topology of the power
lines and of all Access BPL devices at that installation, thus choosing
only representative injection points, as Southern recommends, does not
cover the installation as a whole. Accordingly, we will keep our
proposed in-situ requirements for including and testing all components
of an Access BPL system. We also find that our measurement procedure
for testing Access BPL systems in-situ at three typical underground
locations along a number of radials consistent with testing other part
15 carrier current devices. The selection of three typical underground
installations is a streamlined procedure, compared to testing each and
every installation, as recommended by some parties; therefore we do not
agree with Main.Net that only one underground location should be
tested. We discuss below the issues with respect to measuring radiated
emissions from Access BPL systems on overhead power lines.
39. Measurement Distance. Despite the stated aversion of NTIA and
ARRL to distance extrapolation, we recognize that at many in-situ test
locations, it may not be possible or practicable to measure at the
proposed fixed distances of 10 and 3 meters. If a 10-meter distance
places the measurement antenna on a roadway, safety may dictate
increasing the distance to, e.g., 14 meters in order to position the
testers out of harm's way. Hence, we expect that distance extrapolation
will be necessary for in-situ testing. We note that NTIA's latest
computer modeling results show that the variation of field strength
with distance is consistent with the existing part 15 distance
extrapolation when used with the slant range distance to the power line
as was proposed in Appendix C of the NPRM. We also note that although
the ARRL and ARINC recommend the use of a 20 dB per decade
extrapolation factor rather than the existing 40 dB per decade in part
15 for frequencies below 30 MHz, Ameren states that it has determined
the characteristics of the fields near the line support the case for
assuming a 40 dB per decade decay rate of the field away from the line
and recommends the use of the existing 40 dB per decade extrapolation
factor. Given the lack of conclusive

[[Page 1369]]

experimental data pending large scale Access BPL deployments, we will
continue the use of the existing part 15 distance extrapolation factors
in our rules, but with the slant range rather than horizontal distance.
If new information becomes available that alternative emission limit/
distance standards or extrapolation factors would be more appropriate,
we will revisit this issue at another time.
40. Receive Antenna Height and Correction Factor. NTIA expresses a
possible need for ``adjustments'' to measured data due to three
factors: (1) Effect of antenna height, (2) effect of distance
(extrapolation methods), and (3) effect of using an H-field sensing
antenna to predict E-fields in the near-field region. However, NTIA
initially provided a specific recommendation regarding only one of
these issues--correction for the effect of antenna height. Our modeling
suggests that there is a linkage between these factors. We believe that
all three areas must be considered together in order to develop
appropriate measurement procedures. Furthermore, NTIA's recommendation
for a 5 dB correction factor is based on a constant measurement antenna
height of 1 meter. On the other hand, for frequencies above 30 MHz, our
current measurement guidelines require varying the receive antenna
height from 1 to 4 meters, hence higher peaks at a higher antenna
height would be found with our test procedure, obviating the need for a
height correction factor at those frequencies. However, we recognize
that NTIA's method of keeping the antenna height constant and applying
a height correction factor is aimed at simplifying the measurement
procedure; hence, this might be an alternative testing procedure that
BPL providers may actually prefer. The Commission's rules have
historically allowed the use of alternative methods for compliance
measurements, based on good engineering practices. In deference to
NTIA's extensive work culminating in the NTIA recommendations in this
proceeding, we will adopt NTIA's recommendations for antenna height and
correction factor as an alternative method within the measurement
guidelines of Appendix C of the Report and Order. We note however that
the methods are mutually exclusive, i.e., the BPL tester must choose
either the NTIA alternative method or the FCC method, and cannot mix
and match the two.
41. Type of Antenna Used for Testing. Given NTIA's concurrence with
the use of a magnetic loop antenna for emission measurements below 30
MHz and electric field sensing antennas above 30 MHz, we are adopting
our proposal to use these antenna types in Access BPL emission
measurements. This decision is consistent with the use of such antennas
for testing other types of part 15 devices.
42. Effects of Power Lines on the Radiated Emissions of a BPL
Device. We are concerned that NTIA's recommendation for performing
field strength measurements all along a 1200-meter section of the
connected power line wiring would be difficult and burdensome for
Access BPL system operation. In this regard, we note that such a
process could be time-consuming and would require many individual
measurements, when power wiring may be many miles long, and the
interval between measurements may have to be a small fraction of a
wavelength in order to ensure that the true peak is captured. It is
clear from the modeling results presented by NTIA that the maximum
emission from the system often occurs further down-line from the
coupler than the one-wavelength maximum distance proposed in Appendix C
of the NPRM. However, it is also clear from the NTIA data that the true
maximum is not significantly larger than the maximum that would be
found over the limited search space that we proposed. We understand the
concerns of Ameren, Southern, and other BPL providers regarding an
overly large number of necessary measurements, which could increase the
costs of compliance testing. We therefore believe that the approach in
our proposed measurement guidelines strikes an appropriate balance in
avoiding a potentially very large number of measurements by allowing
the use of the mid-band frequency in determining measurement distances
down-line for a given frequency band of operation. We also note that,
at each of the five specified down-line points, measurements must be
made at all operating frequencies of the Access BPL device, in order to
find the peaks.
43. We concur with NTIA's recommendation that measurements be made
sequentially with the Access BPL devices operating at all frequencies
at which they are capable. This is consistent with existing part 15
requirements, and with our proposed measurement guidelines. It is
important that radiated emissions be measured at all operating
frequencies to find the peaks. We also concur with NTIA's
recommendation that measurements be made using the maximum possible BPL
device output power and operational duty factor. We disagree with
Progress Energy that emission measurements should be performed with the
Access BPL equipment power levels set for normal operations at that
site, and not at the maximum levels. Testing at the BPL maximum output
power and operational duty factor is necessary to ensure identification
of the maximum field strength that the device is capable of generating.
The measurement report and operating instructions must clearly state
the maximum output power and duty factor settings necessary to certify
that the installed device will comply with our limits. However, because
the same device might be used on either overhead or underground power
lines having different radiating properties, we are not requiring that
the device be modified to prevent operation at higher power levels and
duty cycle settings. Furthermore, Access BPL devices must comply with
our limits upon power-up following a fault condition, or during a
start-up operation after a shut-off procedure, by the use of a non-
volatile memory, or some other method, to immediately restore previous
settings with programmed notches and excluded bands. This is necessary
to avoid the situation where programmed protection schemes, such as
excluded bands and notches, have to be restored manually, thus leaving
protected licensed services vulnerable during the time delay caused by
a manual re-programming procedure.
44. Based on the foregoing, we believe that our proposed
measurement guidelines that require selection of fractional wavelengths
based on mid-band frequency for down-line measurements strike an
appropriate balance between the need to ensure compliance with the
rules and practical considerations of the burden and degree of
measurement difficulty placed on system operators, and that our
requirements for testing at maximum output power and operational duty
factor and requirement for clear identification of maximum compliant
operating levels will ensure that devices comply under all conditions.
Accordingly, we are adopting the measurement guidelines in Appendix C
of the NPRM, modified to incorporate some of NTIA's recommendations, as
discussed in the Report and Order.
45. Selection of Representative Installations. Although we concur
with NTIA that the selection of typical Access BPL installations for
in-situ measurements must be made in a careful manner, taking into
account the various configurations of the power lines to select a
typical, representative installation, we will not require specific
criteria for site selection process, because this may limit the number
of test sites which may actually be more typical in a specific
provider's service area than those recommended by NTIA.

[[Page 1370]]

We find that our proposed guidelines for three typical overhead
installations and three typical underground installations are
reasonable to cover a number of test sites in deployment. We also find
that by requiring Access BPL devices to be certified by the equipment
manufacturer, the concerns of Progress Energy regarding Access BPL
installation sites with multiple vendors' equipment no longer exist
because the responsibility for site selection to test for equipment
certification purposes rests with the Access BPL manufacturer and not
with the utility. We are however recommending that the utility operator
verify that each representative Access BPL site complies following the
installation of a separately certified Access BPL equipment. In such
cases, the selection of the test site should be based on the
characteristics of the installation and not on vendor's equipment
types. Additionally, we concur with Southern and UPLC that NTIA's
recommendation in the NTIA Phase 1 Study of requiring a representative
power line of 600 meters devoid of discontinuities is impractical,
because of the difficulty of finding such a line. Accordingly, in the
absence of more specific input, we will not require the selection of
such a specific type of power line.
46. Other requirements. We find that NTIA's recommendations
regarding the various reporting requirements for the test report are
satisfied by our adoption of the certification procedure for Access BPL
equipment authorization. Information regarding the test conditions,
spectrum distribution and other relevant technical specifications will
be required in the certification report for the equipment, which will
be accessible through our equipment authorization database. We further
find that NTIA's recommendation to embody requirements such as
measurement distance, measurement bandwidth, etc. directly into the
rules and not merely as guidelines, would not be consistent with our
current practice of including measurement specifications in a separate
guideline.

In-House Carrier Current Systems

47. We note that although CISPR is continuing to work on addressing
emission issues that will apply to In-House BPL, no final
recommendation has been adopted. We also note that most commenters in
this proceeding address Access BPL, and not In-House BPL, issues.
Measurements along the service wire leading to the house have been
proposed because this wire can be one of the conduits for radiation
coming from In-House BPL devices. We are sympathetic to HomePlug's
concerns, however. To address HomePlug's concerns, we will allow
measurements to be made at three different points along the wire, where
the highest radiated emissions are found; these points would not need
to be associated with specific wavelengths of the device's operating
frequencies, if the installation under test does not include a service
wire with a sufficient length for the required measurements. Moreover,
testing is required on only one side of the service wire because
radiation is nearly symmetrical on either side of the wire. The test
report must provide documentation explaining the test configuration. As
for the required clear space along the service wire, the guidelines do
allow the test to be performed at 3 meters with a distance
extrapolation factor when a 10-meter clearance is not available, hence
we would expect that most residence configurations would not pose any
clearance problem. Accordingly, we partially grant HomePlug's request
and hereby adopt the guidelines for In-House BPL and all other in-house
types of carrier current systems in Appendix C of this Report and
Order.

Equipment Authorization

48. Upon careful consideration of the record, we find that Access
BPL systems are not typical unintentional radiators, and that emission
measurements for such systems in-situ are critical in determining their
interference potential. We are persuaded by NTIA that the newness of
the Access BPL measurement procedures warrants review of measurement
reports. We therefore conclude that the Certification procedure is
appropriate for this new technology to allow us to maintain oversight
until additional operational experience is obtained from its wide
deployment. While we appreciate NTIA's concerns for assigning
responsibility with respect to Access BPL compliance, we do not find
that the operator, rather than the Access BPL equipment manufacturer,
should bear the burden of the certification requirement. Since a system
operator does not control the manufacture of the equipment, it will not
be in a position to control production to ensure that each unit
marketed conforms to the unit tested for compliance. We believe that
the legal and business relationship between the system operator and the
BPL manufacturer will be sufficient to ensure that Access BPL equipment
installed on a power line be in compliance with our rules. We do,
however, strongly recommend that operators perform initial installation
and subsequent periodic testing on their systems in order to ensure
that the systems maintain compliance with our emission limits.
49. Based on the foregoing, we are subjecting Access BPL to the
certification procedure to be carried out by the equipment
manufacturer. We are also clarifying that we are retaining the
verification procedure for all carrier current systems other than
Access BPL, because the verification procedure has been adequate to
ensure that other types of carrier current systems comply with the part
15 rules.
50. We also specify that Access BPL certification will be initially
performed by the Commission. In General Docket No. 98-68, we
established the requirements for Telecommunication Certification Bodies
(TCBs) that are allowed to approve equipment in the same manner as the
Commission. In that proceeding, we stated that while we intended to use
TCBs to certify a broad range of equipment, we found that certain
functions should continue to be performed by the Commission. The
functions included certifying new or unique equipment for which the
rules or requirements do not exist or for which the application of the
rules is not clear. Because Access BPL is a new technology and many
questions about the application of the rules may arise, we believe that
TCBs should not be permitted to certify Access BPL systems or approve
permissive changes to Access BPL systems until the Chief of the Office
of Engineering and Technology acting under the existing delegated
authority announces that TCBs may certify Access BPL systems.

Miscellaneous

51. Transition Period and Grandfathering of Existing Access BPL
Equipment. We note that the major differences between the existing part
15 rules for carrier current systems and the newly adopted rules in
subpart G for Access BPL are (1) the type of equipment authorization
procedure--Verification for existing carrier current systems,
Certification for Access BPL systems; (2) the requirement for
interference mitigation techniques and avoidance of excluded bands and
exclusion zones for Access BPL systems; and (3) the requirement for an
Access BPL database concurrent with consultation with licensed spectrum
users. Insofar as existing deployed Access BPL systems can satisfy (2)
and (3) by working with licensed spectrum users to avoid co-channel
operations, and by being listed in the Access BPL database, the
requirements of (1) can be satisfied by having compliance test data

[[Page 1371]]

available for inspection during the transition period. We clarify that
after the transition period, all Access BPL devices that are
manufactured, imported, marketed or installed shall comply with the
requirements specified in subpart G of part 15, including certification
of the equipment.
52. We believe that it would be an undue burden on those operators
who have deployed Access BPL systems to require their systems to come
into compliance with the rules adopted herein, as long as the deployed
equipment does not cause harmful interference and the operator takes
the necessary steps to eliminate occurrences of harmful interference.
We agree with Progress Energy that once a system has been installed and
is operating within the limits and requirements in place when it was
installed, the system should be allowed to remain in operation. We
will, of course, require that all Access BPL systems and equipment
comply with the non-interference rule of part 15, that is, there is not
transition period for compliance with the emission limits, which we are
not changing. We find that Access BPL equipment should be allowed a
transition period for compliance with new rules, in the manner that we
typically provide for other part 15 devices. This will minimize
economic hardships on manufacturers by allowing them, during the
transition period, to continue producing and selling existing equipment
while modifying their products to meet the new requirements. If an
Access BPL device does not cause harmful interference, it can continue
to operate until its natural replacement, unless the equipment is
subsequently modified, at which time it must be brought into compliance
with the new rules. We believe that a transition time frame of 18
months is adequate as this represents the typical high tech equipment
life cycle. Accordingly, we are adopting a cut-off date of 18 months
from the date of publication of this Report and Order. All Access BPL
devices that are manufactured, imported, marketed or installed July 7,
2006 shall comply with the requirements specified in subpart G of this
part, including certification of the equipment. Access BPL equipment
manufactured, imported, marketed and installed prior to this date shall
comply with the requirements that were in effect immediately prior to
the effective date of this Report and Order.
53. Separate Rule Part for Access BPL Systems. NTIA and IEEE 802.18
advocate the creation of a new, dedicated rule part or a separate
subpart of part 15 for Access BPL systems, because many of the adopted
rules will be unique to Access BPL. We find that the complete
separation of the rules for Access BPL equipment from part 15
inadvisable due to possible confusion and repetition of requirements in
two places, as Access BPL equipment must comply with the general
requirements for unlicensed devices of subparts A-C of the existing
part 15 rules. We do, however, find that requirements specific to
Access BPL equipment warrant the creation of a separate subpart of part
15. Accordingly, we are adding subpart G to part 15 of our rules which
will contain unique requirements for Access BPL equipment, with cross
reference to other applicable subparts.
54. Motions and Requests. We have received several motions and
requests for additional extensions of time and for reiteration of
proposals to take into account information added to the record since
the NPRM. We are generally considering the substance of these motions
and requests as filed comments, and denying the specific procedural
remedies requested, as they offer no new information or arguments
sufficient to justify procedural delays, nor do they raise issues
beyond those already explicitly or implicitly included in the record
and capable of full consideration in this Order.

Final Regulatory Flexibility Analysis

55. As required by the Regulatory Flexibility Act (``RFA''),\1\ an
Initial Regulatory Flexibility Analysis (``IRFA'') was incorporated in
the Notice of Proposed Rule Making (``NPRM'') in this proceeding, ET
Docket Nos. 04-37 & 03-104. The Commission sought written public
comment on the proposals in the NPRM, including comment on the IRFA.
This Final Regulatory Flexibility Analysis (``FRFA'') conforms to the
RFA.\2\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

\1\ See 5 U.S.C. 603. The RFA, see 5 U.S.C. 601-612, has been
amended by the Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act of
1996 (SBREFA), Pub. L. 104-121, Title II, 110 Stat. 857 (1996).
\2\ See 5 U.S.C. 604.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

A. Need for, and Objectives of, the Report and Order

56. By this action, the Commission amends part 15 of the rules for
radio frequency (RF) devices regarding Access Broadband over Power Line
(Access BPL), a new type of carrier current system that operates on an
unlicensed basis under part 15. Access BPL systems use existing
electrical power lines as a transmission medium to provide high-speed
communications capabilities by coupling RF energy onto the power line.
Given that power lines reach virtually every residence and business in
every community and geographic area in this country, Access BPL service
could be made available nearly everywhere. This new broadband delivery
medium could also serve to introduce additional competition to existing
cable, DSL, and other broadband services. At the same time, we
recognize the concerns of authorized radio services in both the private
and government sectors for the need to ensure that RF energy from BPL
signals on power lines does not cause harmful interference to licensed
radio services. Our goals in developing the rules for Access BPL
therefore are to provide a framework that will both facilitate the
rapid introduction and development of BPL systems and protect licensed
radio services from harmful interference. Specifically, we adopted in
the Report and Order: (1) New operational requirements for Access BPL
to promote avoidance and resolution of harmful interference, (2) new
administrative requirements to aid in identifying Access BPL
installations; and (3) specific measurement guidelines and
certification requirements to allow accurate and repeatable evaluations
of emissions from Access BPL and all other carrier current systems.
These actions will further the development of BPL systems by removing
regulatory uncertainties for BPL operators and equipment manufacturers
and facilitate the continued deployment of these new broadband networks
while ensuring that licensed radio services are protected from harmful
interference. The record and our investigations indicate that BPL
network systems can generally be configured and managed to minimize
and/or eliminate this interference potential.

B. Summary of Significant Issues Raised by Public Comments in Response
to the IRFA

57. No comments were filed in response to the IRFA.

C. Description and Estimate of the Number of Small Entities to Which
the Rules Will Apply

58. The RFA directs agencies to provide a description of, and,
where feasible, an estimate of, the number of small entities that may
be affected by the rules adopted herein.\3\ The RFA generally defines
the term ``small entity'' as having the same meaning as the terms
``small business,'' ``small organization,'' and ``small governmental
jurisdiction.'' \4\ In addition, the term

[[Page 1372]]

``small business'' has the same meaning as the term ``small business
concern'' under the Small Business Act.\5\ A ``small business concern''
is one which: (1) Is independently owned and operated; (2) is not
dominant in its field of operation; and (3) satisfies any additional
criteria established by the Small Business Administration (SBA).\6\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

\3\ 5 U.S.C. 604(a)(3).
\4\ 5 U.S.C. 601(6).
\5\ 5 U.S.C. 601(3) (incorporating by reference the definition
of ``small-business concern'' in the Small Business Act, 15 U.S.C.
632). Pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 601(3), the statutory definition of a
small business applies ``unless an agency, after consultation with
the Office of Advocacy of the Small Business Administration and
after opportunity for public comment, establishes one or more
definitions of such term which are appropriate to the activities of
the agency and publishes such definition(s) in the Federal
Register.''
\6\ 15 U.S.C. 632.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

59. The rules adopted in the Report and Order pertain to
manufacturers of unlicensed communications devices. The appropriate
small business size standard is that which the SBA has established for
radio and television broadcasting and wireless communications equipment
manufacturing. This category encompasses entities that primarily
manufacture radio, television, and wireless communications
equipment.\7\ Under this standard, firms are considered small if they
have 750 or fewer employees.\8\ Census Bureau data for 1997 indicate
that, for that year, there were a total of 1,215 establishments \9\ in
this category.\10\ Of those, there were 1,150 that had employment under
500, and an additional 37 that had employment of 500 to 999. The
percentage of wireless equipment manufacturers in this category is
approximately 61.35%,\11\ so the Commission estimates that the number
of wireless equipment manufacturers with employment under 500 was
actually closer to 706, with an additional 23 establishments having
employment of between 500 and 999. Given the above, the Commission
estimates that the great majority of wireless communications equipment
manufacturers are small businesses.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

\7\ NAICS code 334220.
\8\ Id.
\9\ The number of ``establishments'' is a less helpful indicator
of small business prevalence in this context than would be the
number of ``firms'' or ``companies,'' because the latter take into
account the concept of common ownership or control. Any single
physical location for any entity is an establishment, even though
that location may be owned by a different establishment. Thus, the
numbers given may reflect inflated numbers of businesses in this
category, including the numbers of small businesses. In this
category, the Census breaks-out data for firms or companies only to
give the total number of such entities for 1997, which was 1,089.
\10\ U.S. Census Bureau, 1997 Economic Census, Industry Series:
Manufacturing, ``Industry Statistics by Employment Size,'' Table 4,
NAICS code 334220 (issued August 1999).
\11\ Id. Table 5, ``Industry Statistics by Industry and Primary
Product Class Specialization: 1997.''
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

D. Description of Projected Reporting, Recordkeeping, and Other
Compliance Requirements

60. Although a large number of part 15 radio frequency devices are
already required to be authorized under the Commission's Certification,
Declaration of Conformity, or Verification procedures as a prerequisite
to marketing and importation, the adopted rules add a slight amount of
new testing and reporting requirements, to ensure protection of
licensed spectrum users from harmful interference. These requirements
include the proposed technical requirement for adaptive interference
mitigation capabilities and the proposed notification of Access BPL
systems in a database similar to the one required for existing Power
Line Carrier systems. The major differences between the existing part
15 rules for carrier current systems and the newly adopted rules in
subpart G for Access BPL are (1) the type of equipment authorization
procedure,--Verification for existing carrier current systems,
Certification for Access BPL systems; (2) the requirement for
interference mitigation techniques and avoidance of excluded bands and
exclusion zones for Access BPL systems; and (3) the requirement for an
Access BPL database concurrent with consultation with licensed spectrum
users. Because Access BPL systems operate in the High Frequency (HF)
and in the low Very High Frequency (VHF) of the spectrum, they must co-
exist with numerous private and governmental authorized radio services.
As such, they present concerns for these licensed users, given the
propagation characteristics of radio frequency signals in these ranges
of frequencies, the diversity of users of these frequencies, and the
fact that Access BPL devices will be installed at many locations in an
area, primarily over unshielded power lines. However, the record and
our own investigations indicate that BPL network systems can generally
be configured and managed to minimize and/or eliminate this
interference potential, through the use of consultation with licensed
services and identification of installed Access BPL equipment in a
database, as well as the adoption of precise measurement procedures.
The adopted certification procedure for Access BPL systems will
therefore help provide a more detailed record of their characteristics
toward this objective.
61. Although the adopted rules do somewhat increase the reporting
and recordkeeping requirements for Access BPL systems, the benefit of
ensuring protection to critical systems operated by law enforcement
groups, government users and emergency operations outweighs this small
cost that will permit the growth of Access BPL in the shared spectrum.

E. Steps Taken To Minimize Significant Economic Impact on Small
Entities, and Significant Alternatives Considered

62. The RFA requires an agency to describe any significant
alternatives that it has considered in reaching its proposed approach,
which may include the following four alternatives: (1) The
establishment of differing compliance or reporting requirements or
timetables that take into account the resources available to small
entities; (2) the clarification, consolidation, or simplification of
compliance or reporting requirements under the rule for small entities;
(3) the use of performance, rather than design standards; and (4) an
exemption from coverage of the rule, or any part thereof, for small
entities.
63. In the Report and Order, we maintained the existing part 15
emission limits, which are applicable to all part 15 devices, including
BPL. We have adopted new measurement guidelines for BPL and existing
carrier current systems, to assist manufacturers and testing entities
to follow clearer and more precise measurement procedures in the
testing of BPL and carrier current systems (CCS), which will help in
eliminating confusion and repetitive and costly compliance testing.
Although we changed the equipment authorization procedure from
Verification to Certification for Access BPL systems, this is because
Access BPL systems operate in a different environment than other
unlicensed part 15 devices and to avoid overburdening the information
that would otherwise be required to be submitted into the Access BPL
database. We have adopted a simple Access BPL database format for the
notification of Access BPL systems, rather than a complex one with all-
inclusive and more comprehensive information. We have narrowed down the
list of absolutely necessary licensed entities that Access BPL
providers must consult with prior to operating in their bands, as well
as the list of exclusion zones and excluded frequency bands in which
Access BPL are prohibited from operating. We have provided a generous
time frame for a transition period, thus allowing existing systems to
continue to operate, as long as they do not cause harmful interference
to other authorized radio services. Finally, the rules will

[[Page 1373]]

apply equally to large and small entities. Therefore, there is no
inequitable impact on small entities.
64. We believe that the rules adopted are equitable, balancing the
critical needs of licensed radio users for protection against harmful
interference, with facilitating the development of Access BPL by
removing regulatory uncertainties. For the reasons stated we find that
the rule changes contained in this Report and Order will not present a
significant economic burden to small entities.

Report to Congress

65. The Commission will send a copy of the Report and Order,
including this FRFA, in a report to Congress pursuant to the
Congressional Review Act.\12\ In addition, the Commission will send a
copy of the Report and Order, including the FRFA, to the Chief Counsel
for Advocacy of the SBA.\13\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

\12\ See 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A).
\13\ See 5 U.S.C. 604(b).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Ordering Clauses

66. Pursuant to the authority contained in Sections 4(i), 301, 302,
303(e), 303(f), and 303(r) of the Communications Act of 1934, as
amended, 47 U.S.C. Sections 154(i), 301, 302, 303(e), 303(f), and
303(r), part 15 of the Commission's Rules are amended, as specified in
Appendix B in the Report and Order, effective 30 days after Federal
Register publication, except for Sec. Sec. 15.615(a) through (e) which
contains information collection requirements that are not effective
until approved by the Office of Management and Budget. The FCC will
publish a document in the Federal Register announcing the effective
date for those sections.
67. The Commission's Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau,
Reference Information Center, shall send a copy of this Report and
Order, including the Final Regulatory Flexibility Analysis, to the
Chief Counsel for Advocacy of the Small Business Administration.

List of Subjects in 47 CFR Part 15

Communications equipment, Radio.

Federal Communications Commission.
William F. Caton,
Deputy Secretary.

Rule Changes

0
For the reasons set forth in the preamble, the Federal Communications
Commission amends 47 CFR part 15 as follows:

PART 15--RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES

0
1. The authority citation for part 15 continues to read as follows:


Authority: 47 U.S.C. 154, 302, 303, 304, 307 and 544A.


0
2. Section 15.3 is amended by adding paragraphs (ff) and (gg) to read
as follows:


Sec. 15.3 Definitions.

* * * * *
(ff) Access Broadband over Power Line (Access BPL). A carrier
current system installed and operated on an electric utility service as
an unintentional radiator that sends radio frequency energy on
frequencies between 1.705 MHz and 80 MHz over medium voltage lines or
over low voltage lines to provide broadband communications and is
located on the supply side of the utility service's points of
interconnection with customer premises. Access BPL does not include
power line carrier systems as defined in Sec. 15.3(t) or In-House BPL
as defined in Sec. 15.3(gg).
(gg) In-House Broadband over Power Line (In-House BPL). A carrier
current system, operating as an unintentional radiator, that sends
radio frequency energy by conduction over electric power lines that are
not owned, operated or controlled by an electric service provider. The
electric power lines may be aerial (overhead), underground, or inside
the walls, floors or ceilings of user premises. In-House BPL devices
may establish closed networks within a user's premises or provide
connections to Access BPL networks, or both.


0
3. Section 15.15 is amended by revising paragraph (b) to read as
follows:


Sec. 15.15 General technical requirements.

* * * * *
(b) Except as follows, an intentional or unintentional radiator
must be constructed such that the adjustments of any control that is
readily accessible by or intended to be accessible to the user will not
cause operation of the device in violation of the regulations. Access
BPL equipment shall comply with the applicable standards at the control
adjustment that is employed. The measurement report used in support of
an application for Certification and the user instructions for Access
BPL equipment shall clearly specify the user-or installer-control
settings that are required for conformance with these regulations.
* * * * *


0
4. Section 15.31 is amended by revising paragraph (f)(5), to read as
follows:


Sec. 15.31 Measurement standards.

* * * * *
(f) * * *
(5) Measurements shall be performed at a sufficient number of
radials around the equipment under test to determine the radial at
which the field strength values of the radiated emissions are
maximized. The maximum field strength at the frequency being measured
shall be reported in the equipment authorization report. This paragraph
shall not apply to Access BPL equipment on overhead medium voltage
lines. In lieu thereof, the measurement guidelines established by the
Commission for Access BPL shall be followed.
* * * * *


0
5. Section 15.37 is amended by adding paragraph (m) to read as follows:


Sec. 15.37 Transition provisions for compliance with the rules.

* * * * *
(m) All Access BPL devices that are manufactured, imported,
marketed or installed on or after July 7, 2006, shall comply with the
requirements specified in subpart G of this part, including
certification of the equipment.


0
6. Section 15.101 is amended by revising the table in paragraph (a) to
read as follows:


Sec. 15.101 Equipment authorization of unintentional radiators.

(a) * * *

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Type of device Equipment
authorization required
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
TV broadcast receiver................... Verification.
FM broadcast receiver................... Verification.
CB receiver............................. Declaration of Conformity or
Certification.
Superregenerative receiver.............. Declaration of Conformity or
Certification.

[[Page 1374]]


Scanning receiver....................... Certification.
Radar detector.......................... Certification.
All other receivers subject to part 15.. Declaration of Conformity or
Certification.
TV interface device..................... Declaration of Conformity or
Certification.
Cable system terminal device............ Declaration of Conformity.
Stand-alone cable input selector switch. Verification.
Class B personal computers and Declaration of Conformity or
Certification.\1\
peripherals.
CPU boards and internal power supplies Declaration of Conformity or
Certification.\1\
used with Class B personal computers.
Class B personal computers assembled Declaration of Conformity.
using authorized CPU boards or power
supplies.
Class B external switching power Verification.
supplies.
Other Class B digital devices & Verification.
peripherals.
Class A digital devices, peripherals & Verification.
external switching power supplies.
Access Broadband over Power Line (Access Certification.
BPL).
All other devices....................... Verification.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

* * * * *


0
7. Part 15 is amended by adding a new Subpart G, to read as follows:

Subpart G--Access Broadband Over Power Line (Access BPL)

Sec.
15.601 Scope.
15.603 Definitions.
15.605 Cross reference.
15.607 Equipment authorization of Access BPL equipment.
15.609 Marketing of Access BPL equipment.
15.611 General technical requirements.
15.613 Measurement procedures.
15.615 General administrative requirements.


Sec. 15.601 Scope.

This subpart sets out the regulations for Access Broadband over
Power Line (Access BPL) devices operating in the 1.705-80 MHz band over
medium or low voltage lines.


Sec. 15.603 Definitions.

(a) Excluded Band: A band of frequencies within which Access BPL
operations are not permitted.
(b) Exclusion Zone: A geographical area within which Access BPL
operations are not permitted in certain frequency bands.
(c) Consultation. The process of communication between an entity
operating Access BPL and a licensed public safety or other designated
point of contact for the purpose of avoiding potential harmful
interference.
(d) Consultation area: A designated geographical area within which
consultation with public safety users or other designated point of
contact is required before an Access BPL may be operated at designated
frequencies.
(e) Low Voltage power line. A power line carrying low voltage,
e.g., 240/120 volts from a distribution transformer to a customer's
premises.
(f) Medium Voltage power line. A power line carrying between 1,000
to 40,000 volts from a power substation to neighborhoods. Medium
voltage lines may be overhead or underground, depending on the power
grid network topology.
(g) Access BPL Database. A database operated by an industry-
sponsored entity, recognized by the Federal Communications Commission
and the National Telecommunications and Information Administration
(NTIA), containing information regarding existing and planned Access
BPL systems, as required in Sec. 15.615(a) of this chapter.


Sec. 15.605 Cross reference.

(a) The provisions of subparts A and B of this part apply to Access
BPL devices, except where specifically noted. The provisions of
subparts C through F of this part do not apply to Access BPL devices
except where specifically noted.
(b) The requirements of this subpart apply only to the radio
circuitry that is used to provide carrier current operation for the
Access BPL device. Other aspects of the operation of an Access BPL
device may be subject to requirements contained elsewhere in this
chapter. In particular, an Access BPL device that includes digital
circuitry that is not used solely to enable the operation of the radio
frequency circuitry used to provide carrier current operation also is
subject to the requirements for unintentional radiators in subpart B of
this part.


Sec. 15.607 Equipment authorization of Access BPL equipment.

Access BPL equipment shall be subject to Certification as specified
in Sec. 15.101.


Sec. 15.609 Marketing of Access BPL equipment.

The marketing of Access BPL equipment must be directed solely to
parties eligible to operate the equipment. Eligible parties consist of
AC power line public utilities, Access BPL service providers and
associates of Access BPL service providers. The responsible party, as
defined in Sec. 2.909 of this chapter, is responsible for ensuring
that the equipment is marketed only to eligible parties. Marketing of
the equipment in any other manner may be considered grounds for
revocation of the grant of certification issued for the equipment.


Sec. 15.611 General technical requirements.

(a) Conducted emission limits. Access BPL is not subject to the
conducted emission limits of Sec. 15.107.
(b) Radiated emission limits. (1) Medium voltage power lines. (i)
Access BPL systems that operate in the frequency range of 1.705 kHz to
30 MHz over medium voltage power lines shall comply with the radiated
emission limits for intentional radiators provided in Sec. 15.209.
(ii) Access BPL systems that operate in the frequency range above
30 MHz over medium voltage power lines shall comply with the radiated
emission limits provided in Sec. 15.109(b).
(2) Low voltage power lines. Access BPL systems that operate over
low-voltage power lines, including those that operate over low-voltage
lines that are connected to the in-building wiring, shall comply with
the radiated emission limits provided in Sec. 15.109(a) and (e).
(c) Interference Mitigation and Avoidance. (1) Access BPL systems
shall incorporate adaptive interference mitigation techniques to
remotely reduce power and adjust operating frequencies, in order to
avoid site-specific, local use of the same spectrum by licensed
services. These techniques may include adaptive or ``notch'' filtering,
or complete avoidance of frequencies, or bands of frequencies, locally
used by licensed radio operations.
(i) For frequencies below 30 MHz, when a notch filter is used to
avoid interference to a specific frequency band, the Access BPL system
shall be

[[Page 1375]]

capable of attenuating emissions within that band to a level at least
20 dB below the applicable part 15 limits.
(ii) For frequencies above 30 MHz, when a notch filter is used to
avoid interference to a specific frequency band, the Access BPL system
shall be capable of attenuating emissions within that band to a level
at least 10 dB below the applicable part 15 limits.
(2) Access BPL systems shall comply with applicable radiated
emission limits upon power-up following a fault condition, or during a
start-up operation after a shut-off procedure, by the use of a non-
volatile memory, or some other method, to immediately restore previous
settings with programmed notches and excluded bands, to avoid time
delay caused by the need for manual re-programming during which
protected services may be vulnerable.
(3) Access BPL systems shall incorporate a remote-controllable
shut-down feature to deactivate, from a central location, any unit
found to cause harmful interference, if other interference mitigation
techniques do not resolve the interference problem.


Sec. 15.613 Measurement procedures.

Compliance measurements for Access BPL shall be made in accordance
with the Guidelines for Access BPL systems specified by the Commission.


Sec. 15.615 General administrative requirements.

(a) Access BPL Database. Entities operating Access BPL systems
shall supply to an industry-recognized entity, information on all
existing Access BPL systems and all proposed Access BPL systems for
inclusion into a publicly available data base, within 30 days prior to
initiation of service. Such information shall include the following:
(1) The name of the Access BPL provider.
(2) The frequencies of the Access BPL operation.
(3) The postal zip codes served by the specific Access BPL
operation.
(4) The manufacturer and type of Access BPL equipment and its
associated FCC ID number, or, in the case of Access BPL equipment that
has been subject to verification, the Trade Name and Model Number, as
specified on the equipment label.
(5) The contact information, including both phone number and e-mail
address of a person at, or associated with, the BPL operator's company,
to facilitate the resolution of any interference complaint.
(6) The proposed/or actual date of Access BPL operation.
(b) The Access BPL database manager shall enter this information
into the publicly accessible database within three (3) business days of
receipt.
(c) No notification to the Commission is required.
(d) A licensed spectrum user experiencing harmful interference that
is suspected to be caused by an Access BPL system shall inform the
local BPL operator's contact person designated in the Access BPL
database. The investigation of the reported interference and the
resolution of confirmed harmful interference from the Access BPL system
shall be successfully completed by the BPL operator within a reasonable
time period according to a mutually acceptable schedule, after the
receipt of an interference complaint, in order to avoid protracted
disruptions to licensed services. The Access BPL operator shall respond
to complaints of harmful interference from public safety users within
24 hours. With regard to public safety complaints, the BPL provider
shall be required to immediately cease the operations causing such
complaint if it fails to respond within 24 hours.
(e) Consultation with public safety users. An entity operating an
Access BPL system shall notify and consult with the public safety users
in the area where it plans to deploy Access BPL, at least 30 days prior
to initiation of any operation or service. This entity shall design or
implement the Access BPL system such that it does not cause harmful
interference in those frequencies or bands used by the public safety
agencies in the area served by the Access BPL system. The notification
shall include, at a minimum, the information in paragraph (a) of this
section.
(f) Federal government spectrum users and other radio service
users. An entity operating an Access BPL system shall ensure that,
within its Access BPL deployment area, its system does not operate on
any frequencies designated as excluded bands or on identified
frequencies within any designated exclusion zones.
(1) Excluded Bands. To protect Aeronautical (land) stations and
aircraft receivers, Access BPL operations using overhead medium voltage
power lines are prohibited in the frequency bands listed in Table 1.
Specifically, such BPL systems shall not place carrier frequencies in
these bands.

Table 1.--Excluded Frequency Bands
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Frequency band
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
2,850-3,025 kHz
3,400-3,500 kHz
4,650-4,700 kHz
5,450-5,680 kHz
6,525-6,685 kHz
8,815-8,965 kHz
10,005-10,100 kHz
11,275-11,400 kHz
13,260-13,360 kHz
17,900-17,970 kHz
21,924-22,000 kHz
74.8-75.2 MHz
------------------------------------------------------------------------

(2) Exclusion zones. Exclusion zones encompass the operation of any
Access BPL system within 1 km of the boundary of coast station
facilities at the coordinates listed in Tables 2 and 2.1. Exclusion
zones also encompass the operation of Access BPL systems using overhead
medium voltage power lines within 29 km of the coordinates for the ten
Very Long Baseline Array facilities listed in Allocation US311.
Exclusion zones further encompass the operation of Access BPL systems
using overhead low voltage power lines or underground power lines
within 11 km of the coordinates for the ten Very Long Baseline Array
facilities listed in Allocation US311. Within the exclusion zones for
coast stations, Access BPL systems shall not use carrier frequencies
within the band of 2173.5-2190.5 kHz. Within the exclusion zone for
Very Long Baseline Array radio astronomy observatories, Access BPL
systems shall not use carrier frequencies within the 73.0-74.6 MHz
band.
(i) Existing coast station facilities. Access BPL systems shall not
operate in the frequency band 2,173.5-2,190.5 kHz, within 1 kilometer
(km) of the boundary of coast station facilities at the coordinates
listed in Tables 2 and 2.1. BPL operators planning to deploy Access BPL
devices at these frequencies in areas within these exclusion zones as
defined above shall consult with the appropriate point of contact for
these coast stations to ensure harmful interference is prevented at
these facilities.
Point of contact: Commandant (CG 622), U.S. Coast Guard, 2100 2nd
Street, SW., Washington, DC 20593-0001, Telephone: (202) 267-2860, e-
mail: .

[[Page 1376]]



Table 2.--Exclusion Zones for U.S. Coast Guard Coast Stations
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Locale Latitude Longitude
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Group Guam.................... 13[deg]35'23'' N 144[deg]50'24'' E
GANTSEC....................... 18[deg]18'00'' N 65[deg]46'59'' W
Puerto Rico................... 18[deg]28'11'' N 66[deg]07'47'' W
Honolulu...................... 21[deg]18'21'' N 157[deg]53'23'' W
Group Key West................ 24[deg]33'35'' N 81[deg]47'59'' W
Trumbo Point CG Base.......... 24[deg]33'58'' N 81[deg]47'57'' W
Miami......................... 25[deg]37'28'' N 80[deg]23'07'' W
Everglades Park............... 25[deg]50'10'' N 81[deg]23'13'' W
Group Saint Petersburg 25[deg]51'00'' N 81[deg]23'24'' W
(Everglades).
Station Ft. Lauderdale........ 26[deg]05'21'' N 80[deg]06'40'' W
Station Ft. Myers Beach....... 26[deg]27'34'' N 81[deg]57'15'' W
Group Miami (Ft. Pierce)...... 27[deg]27'36'' N 80[deg]18'36'' W
Station Ft. Pierce............ 27[deg]27'50'' N 80[deg]18'27'' W
Group Corpus Christi.......... 27[deg]42'01'' N 97[deg]16'11'' W
Group Corpus Christi.......... 27[deg]42'06'' N 97[deg]16'45'' W
ESD Saint Petersburg.......... 27[deg]45'21'' N 82[deg]37'32'' W
Group Saint Petersburg........ 27[deg]46'11'' N 82[deg]37'47'' W
Station Port O'Connor......... 28[deg]26'03'' N 96[deg]25'39'' W
S. Padre Island............... 28[deg]26'22'' N 97[deg]09'56'' W
Freeport...................... 28[deg]55'59'' N 95[deg]16'59'' W
Group Galveston (Freeport).... 28[deg]56'24'' N 95[deg]17'59'' W
Station YANKEETOWN............ 29[deg]01'51'' N 82[deg]43'39'' W
Station Ponce De Leon Inlet... 29[deg]03'50'' N 81[deg]55'01'' W
Group New Orleans (Grand Isle) 29[deg]15'53'' N 89[deg]57'26'' W
Galveston..................... 29[deg]19'59'' N 94[deg]46'18'' W
Kapalan....................... 29[deg]20'04'' N 94[deg]47'17'' W
Sabine........................ 29[deg]43'42'' N 93[deg]52'14'' W
New Orleans................... 30[deg]01'17'' N 90[deg]07'24'' W
Panama City................... 30[deg]10'01'' N 85[deg]45'04'' W
Group Mobile (Panama City).... 30[deg]10'12'' N 85[deg]45'36'' W
ANT Jacksonville Beach........ 30[deg]17'16'' N 81[deg]24'10'' W
Pensacola..................... 30[deg]20'24'' N 87[deg]18'17'' W
Group Mayport................. 30[deg]23'10'' N 81[deg]26'01'' W
Group Mayport................. 30[deg]23'24'' N 81[deg]25'48'' W
Ft. Morgan.................... 30[deg]39'07'' N 88[deg]03'12'' W
Tybee Lighthouse.............. 32[deg]01'15'' N 80[deg]50'39'' W
Point Loma Lighthouse......... 32[deg]39'56'' N 117[deg]14'34'' W
Point Loma.................... 32[deg]40'07'' N 117[deg]14'14'' W
Activities San Diego.......... 32[deg]43'59'' N 117[deg]11'13'' W
Group Charleston (Sullivan's 32[deg]45'00'' N 79[deg]49'47'' W
Island).
Sullivan's Island Lights...... 32[deg]45'02'' N 79[deg]50'03'' W
Group Charleston.............. 32[deg]46'25'' N 79[deg]56'37'' W
Group San Diego............... 32[deg]52'48'' N 118[deg]26'23'' W
San Pedro..................... 33[deg]45'00'' N 118[deg]15'58'' W
Group Fort Macon.............. 33[deg]53'24'' N 78[deg]01'48'' W
Point Mugu.................... 33[deg]59'32'' N 119[deg]07'18'' W
Group LA/Long Beach........... 34[deg]07'11'' N 119[deg]06'35'' W
Channel Island................ 34[deg]09'17'' N 119[deg]13'11'' W
Station Oxnard Channel Island. 34[deg]09'43'' N 119[deg]13'19'' W
Group Ft. Macon............... 34[deg]41'48'' N 76[deg]40'59'' W
Group Cape Hatteras........... 35[deg]13'59'' N 75[deg]31'59'' W
Group Cape Hatteras........... 35[deg]15'35'' N 75[deg]31'48'' W
Morro Bay (Cambria)........... 35[deg]31'21'' N 121[deg]03'31'' W
San Clemente Island........... 32[deg]50'24'' N 118[deg]23'15'' W
Point Pinos................... 36[deg]38'12'' N 121[deg]56'06'' W
CAMSLANT...................... 36[deg]43'47'' N 76[deg]01'11'' W
Group Hampton Roads........... 36[deg]53'01'' N 76[deg]21'10'' W
Point Montara................. 37[deg]31'23'' N 122[deg]30'47'' W
Point Montara Lighthouse...... 37[deg]32'09'' N 122[deg]31'08'' W
Group San Francisco........... 37[deg]32'23'' N 122[deg]31'11'' W
Group San Francisco........... 37[deg]48'34'' N 122[deg]21'55'' W
Point Bonita.................. 37[deg]49'00'' N 122[deg]31'41'' W
Group Eastern Shores.......... 37[deg]55'47'' N 75[deg]22'47'' W
Group Eastern Shore........... 37[deg]55'50'' N 75[deg]22'58'' W
CAMSPAC....................... 38[deg]06'00'' N 122[deg]55'48'' W
Point Arena Lighthouse........ 38[deg]57'18'' N 124[deg]44'28'' W
Point Arena................... 38[deg]57'36'' N 123[deg]44'23'' W
Group Atlantic City........... 39[deg]20'59'' N 74[deg]27'42'' W
Activities New York........... 40[deg]36'06'' N 74[deg]03'36'' W
Activities New York........... 40[deg]37'11'' N 74[deg]04'11'' W
ESD Moriches Hut.............. 40[deg]47'19'' N 72[deg]44'53'' W
Group Moriches................ 40[deg]47'23'' N 72[deg]45'00'' W

[[Page 1377]]


Group Humboldt Bay............ 40[deg]58'41'' N 124[deg]06'31'' W
Group Humboldt Bay............ 40[deg]58'47'' N 124[deg]06'35'' W
Trinidad Head................. 41[deg]03'15'' N 124[deg]09'02'' W
Group Long Island Sound....... 41[deg]16'12'' N 72[deg]54'00'' W
Station New Haven............. 41[deg]16'12'' N 72[deg]54'06'' W
Station Brant Point........... 41[deg]17'21'' N 70[deg]05'31'' W
Group Woods Hole.............. 41[deg]17'23'' N 70[deg]04'47'' W
Station Castle Hill........... 41[deg]27'46'' N 71[deg]21'42'' W
Group Woods Hole.............. 41[deg]17'29'' N 70[deg]401'07'' W
Boston Area................... 41[deg]40'12'' N 70[deg]31'48'' W
Station Provincetown.......... 42[deg]01'48'' N 70[deg]12'42'' W
Eastern Point................. 42[deg]36'24'' N 70[deg]39'26'' W
Cape Blanco................... 42[deg]50'16'' N 124[deg]33'52'' W
Group North Bend.............. 43[deg]24'16'' N 124[deg]13'22'' W
Group North Bend.............. 43[deg]24'35'' N 124[deg]14'23'' W
Cape Elizabeth................ 43[deg]33'28'' N 70[deg]12'00'' W
Group South Portland.......... 43[deg]38'24'' N 70[deg]15'00'' W
Group South Portland.......... 43[deg]38'45'' N 70[deg]14'51'' W
Group SW Harbor............... 44[deg]16'19'' N 68[deg]18'27'' W
Group Southwest Harbor........ 44[deg]16'48'' N 68[deg]18'36'' W
Fort Stevens, Oregon.......... 46[deg]09'14'' N 123[deg]53'07'' W
Group Astoria................. 46[deg]09'29'' N 123[deg]31'48'' W
Group Astoria................. 46[deg]09'35'' N 123[deg]53'24'' W
La Push....................... 47[deg]49'00'' N 124[deg]37'59'' W
Station Quillayute River...... 47[deg]54'49'' N 124[deg]38'01'' W
Port Angeles.................. 48[deg]07'59'' N 123[deg]25'59'' W
Group Port Angeles............ 48[deg]08'24'' N 123[deg]24'35'' W
Juneau (Sitka)................ 57[deg]05'24'' N 135[deg]15'35'' W
Kodiak........................ 57[deg]40'47'' N 152[deg]28'47'' W
Valdez (Cape Hinchinbrook).... 60[deg]26'23'' N 146[deg]25'48'' W
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Note: Systems of coordinates comply with NAD 83.


Table 2.1.--Exclusion Zones for Maritime
Public Coast Stations
[Points of Contact Are Identified in the
Commission's License Database]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Licensee name Location
Latitude Longitude
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Shipcom LLC........................ Marina Del Ray, CA....
33[deg]56'21'' N 118[deg]27'14'' W
Globe Wireless..................... Rio Vista, CA.........
38[deg]11'55'' N 121[deg]48'34'' W
Avalon Communications Corp......... St. Thomas, VI........
18[deg]21'19'' N 64[deg]56'48'' W
Globe Wireless..................... Bishopville, MD.......
38[deg]24'10'' N 75[deg]12'59'' W
Shipcom LLC........................ Mobile, AL............
30[deg]40'07'' N 88[deg]10'23'' W
Shipcom LLC........................ Coden, AL.............
30[deg]22'35'' N 88[deg]12'20'' W
Globe Wireless..................... Pearl River, LA.......
30[deg]22'13'' N 89[deg]47'26'' W
Globe Wireless..................... Kahalelani, HI........
21[deg]10'33'' N 157[deg]10'39'' W
Globe Wireless..................... Palo Alto, CA.........
37[deg]26'44'' N 122[deg]06'48'' W
Globe Wireless..................... Agana, GU.............
13[deg]29'22'' N 144[deg]49'39'' E
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Note: Systems of coordinates comply with NAD 83.

(ii) New or relocated Coast stations. In the unlikely event that a
new or relocated coast station is established for the 2.173.5-2.190.5
kHz band at a coordinate not specified in Table 2 or 2.1, Access BPL
operations in that frequency band shall also be excluded within 1 km of
the new coast station facility;
(iii) Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) radio astronomy
observatories. Access BPL systems using overhead medium voltage power
lines shall not operate in the frequency band 73.0-74.6 MHz, within 29
km of the coordinates of the ten (10) Very Long Baseline Array
facilities listed in 47 CFR 2.106, Note US311. Access BPL systems using
overhead low voltage power lines or underground power lines shall not
operate in the 73.0-74.6 MHz band within 11 km of those coordinates.
(3) Consultation areas. Access BPL operators shall provide
notification to the appropriate point of contact specified below
regarding Access BPL operations at any frequencies of potential concern
in the following consultation areas, at least 30 days prior to
initiation of any operation or service. The notification shall include,
at a minimum, the information in paragraph (a) of this section. We
expect parties to consult in good faith to ensure that no harmful
interference is caused to licensed operations and that any constraints
on BPL deployments are minimized to those necessary to avoid harmful
interference.
(i) For frequencies in the 1.7-30 MHz frequency range, the areas
within 4 km of facilities located at the following coordinates:
(A) The Commission's protected field offices listed in 47 CFR
0.121, the point-of-contact for which is specified in that section;
(B) The aeronautical stations listed in Tables 3a and 3b;
(C) The land stations listed in Tables 4 and 5;

[[Page 1378]]

(ii) For frequencies in the 1.7-38.25 MHz frequency range, the
areas within 4 km of facilities located at the coordinates specified
for radio astronomy facilities in 47 CFR 2.106, Note US 311.
(iii) For frequencies in the 1.7-80 MHz frequency range, the area
within 1 km of the Table Mountain Radio Receiving Zone, the coordinates
and point of contact for which are specified in 47 CFR 21.113(b).
(iv) For frequencies in the 1.7-30 MHz frequency range, the areas
within 37 km of radar receiver facilities located at the coordinates
specified in Table 6.
Point of contact: U.S. Coast Guard HQ, Division of Spectrum
Management CG-622, 2100 Second St., SW., Rm. 6611, Washington, DC
20593, Tel: (202) 267-6036, Fax: (202) 267-4106, e-mail:
.

Table 3a.--Consultation Area Coordinates for Aeronautical
(OR) Stations (1.7-30 MHz)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Command name Location
Latitude Longitude
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Washington......................... Arlington, VA.........
38[deg]51'07'' N 77[deg]02'15'' W
Cape Cod........................... Cape Cod, MA..........
41[deg]42'00'' N 70[deg]30'00'' W
Atlantic City...................... Atlantic City, NJ.....
39[deg]20'59'' N 74[deg]27'42'' W
Elizabeth City..................... Elizabeth City, NC....
36[deg]15'53'' N 76[deg]10'32'' W
Savannah........................... Savannah, GA..........
32[deg]01'30'' N 81[deg]08'30'' W
Miami.............................. Opa Locka, FL.........
25[deg]54'22'' N 80[deg]16'01'' W
Clearwater......................... Clearwater, FL........
27[deg]54'27'' N 82[deg]41' 29'' W
Borinquen.......................... Aguadilla, PR.........
18[deg]18'36'' N 67[deg]04' 48'' W
New Orleans........................ New Orleans, LA.......
29[deg]49'31'' N 90[deg]02' 06'' W
Traverse City...................... Traverse City, MI.....
44[deg]44'24'' N 85[deg]34'54'' W
San Diego.......................... San Diego, CA.........
32[deg]43'33'' N 117[deg]10' 15'' W
Sacramento......................... McCllelan AFB, CA.....
38[deg]40'06'' N 121[deg]24'04'' W
Astoria............................ Warrenton, OR.........
46[deg]25'18'' N 123[deg]47' 46'' W
North Bend......................... North Bend, OR........
43[deg]24'39'' N 124[deg]14'35'' W
Barbers Point...................... Kapolei, HI...........
21[deg]18'01'' N 158[deg]04'15'' W
Kodiak............................. Kodiak, AK............
57[deg]44'19'' N 152[deg]30'18'' W
Houston............................ Houston, TX...........
29[deg]45'00'' N 95[deg]22'00'' W
Detroit............................ Mt. Clemens, MI.......
42[deg]36'05'' N 82[deg]50'12'' W
San Francisco...................... San Francisco, CA.....
37[deg]37'58'' N 122[deg]23'20'' W
Los Angeles........................ Los Angeles, CA.......
33[deg]56'36'' N 118[deg]23'48'' W
Humboldt Bay....................... McKinleyville, CA.....
40[deg]58'39'' N 124[deg]06'45'' W
Port Angeles....................... Port Angeles, WA......
48[deg]08'25'' N 123[deg]24'48'' W
Sitka.............................. Sitka, AK.............
57[deg]05'50'' N 135[deg]21'58'' W
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Note: Systems of coordinates conform to NAD 83.

Point of contact: ARINC, 2551 Riva Road, Annapolis, MD 21401, Tel:
1-800-633-6882, Fax: (410) 266-2329, e-mail:

,
http://www.arinc.com
http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/leaving.cgi?from=leavingFR.html&log=linklog&to=htt p://www.arinc.com
..


Table 3b.--Consultation Area Coordinates for Aeronautical Receive
Stations (1.7-30 MHz)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Locale Latitude Longitude
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Southampton, NY.............. 40[deg]55'15'' N 72[deg]23'41'' W
Molokai, HI.................. 21[deg]12'23'' N 157[deg]12'30'' W
Oahu, HI..................... 21[deg]22'27'' N 158[deg]05'56'' W
Half Moon Bay, CA............ 37[deg]39'00'' N 122[deg]41'00'' W
Pt. Reyes, CA................ 38[deg]06'00'' N 122[deg]56'00'' W
Barrow, AK................... 71[deg]17'24'' N 156[deg]48'12'' W
Guam......................... 13[deg]25'00'' N 144[deg]44'57'' E
(note: Eastern N
Hemisphere)
NY Comm Center, NY........... 40[deg]46'48'' N 73[deg]05''46'' W
Cedar Rapids, IA............. 42[deg]02'05.0'' N 91[deg]38'37.6'' W
Beaumont, CA................. 33[deg]54'27.1'' N 116[deg]59'49.1'' W
Fairfield, TX................ 31[deg]47'02.6'' N 96[deg]47'03.0'' W
Houston, TX.................. 29[deg]36'35.8'' N 95[deg]16'54.8'' W
Miami, FL.................... 25[deg]49'05'' N 80[deg]18'28'' W
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Note: Systems of coordinates conform to NAD 83.

Point of contact: U.S. Coast Guard HQ, Division of Spectrum
Management CG-622, 2100 Second St., SW., Rm. 6611, Washington, DC
20593, Tel: (202) 267-6036, Fax: (202) 267-4106, e-mail:
.

Table 4.--Consultation Area Coordinates for Land
Stations, Set 1 (1.7-30 MHz)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Command name Location
Latitude Longitude
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
COMMSTA Boston..................... Maspee, MA............
41[deg]24'00'' N 70[deg]18'57'' W

[[Page 1379]]


Camslant........................... Chesapeake, VA........
36[deg]33'59'' N 76[deg]15'23'' W
COMMSTA Miami...................... Miami, FL.............
25[deg]36'58'' N 80[deg]23'04'' W
COMMSTA New Orleans................ Belle Chasse, IA......
29[deg]52'40'' N 89[deg]54'46'' W
Camspac............................ Pt. Reyes Sta, CA.....
38[deg]06'00'' N 122[deg]55'48'' W
COMMSTA Honolulu................... Wahiawa, HI...........
21[deg]31'08'' N 157[deg]59'28'' W
COMMSTA Kodiak..................... Kodiak, AK............
57[deg]04'26' N 152[deg]28'20'' W
Guam............................... Finegayan, GU.........
13[deg]53'08'' N 144[deg]50'20'' E
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Note: Systems of coordinates conform to NAD 83.

Point of contact: COTHEN Technical Support Center, COTHEN Program
Manager, Tel: (800) 829-6336.

Table 5.--Consultation Area Coordinates for Land Stations, Set 2 (1.7-30
MHz)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Site name Latitude Longitude
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Albuquerque, NM............... 35[deg]05'02'' N 105[deg]34'23'' W
Arecibo, PR................... 18[deg]17'26'' N 66[deg]22'33'' W
Atlanta, GA................... 32[deg]33''06 N 84[deg]23'35'' W
Beaufort, SC.................. 34[deg]34'22'' N 76[deg]09'48'' W
Cape Charles, VA.............. 37[deg]05'37'' N 75[deg]58'06'' W
Cedar Rapids, IA.............. 42[deg]00'09'' N 91[deg]17'39'' W
Denver, CO.................... 39[deg]15'45'' N 103[deg]34'23'' W
Fort Myers, FL................ 81[deg]31'20'' N 26[deg]20'01'' W
Kansas City, MO............... 38[deg]22'10'' N 93[deg]21'48'' W
Las Vegas, NV................. 36[deg]21'15'' N 114[deg]17'33'' W
Lovelock, NV.................. 40[deg]03'07'' N 118[deg]18'56'' W
Memphis, TN................... 34[deg]21'57'' N 90[deg]02'43'' W
Miami, FL..................... 25[deg]46'20'' N 80[deg]28'48'' W
Morehead City, NC............. 34[deg]34'50'' N 78[deg]13'59'' W
Oklahoma City, OK............. 34[deg]30'52'' N 97[deg]30'52'' W
Orlando, FL................... 28[deg]31'30'' N 80[deg]48'58'' W
Reno, NV...................... 38[deg]31'12'' N 119[deg]14'37'' W
Sarasota, FL.................. 27[deg]12'41'' N 81[deg]31'20'' W
Wilmington, NC................ 34[deg]29'24'' N 78[deg]04'31'' W
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Note: Systems of coordinates conform to NAD 83.

Point Of Contact: ROTHR Deputy Program Manager, (540) 653-3624.

Table 6.--Consultation Area Coordinates for Radar Receiver Stations (1.7-
30 MHz)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Latitude/Longitude
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
18[deg]01' N/66[deg]30' W
28[deg]05' N/98[deg]43' W
36[deg]34' N/76[deg]18' W
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Note: Systems of coordinates conform to NAD 83.

[FR Doc. 05-246 Filed 1-6-05; 8:45 am]

BILLING CODE 6712-01-P

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