Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Old July 4th 08, 10:04 AM posted to rec.radio.shortwave
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by RadioBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 156
Default Peak Oil and Amateur Radio

"What would a viable long-distance communications network in the age of peak
oil look like? To begin with, it would use the airwaves rather than land
lines, to minimize infrastructure, and its energy needs would be modest
enough to be met by local renewable sources."

http://peakoil.com/modules.php?name=...icle&sid=40585

Frank Dresser



  #2   Report Post  
Old July 4th 08, 12:22 PM posted to rec.radio.shortwave
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by RadioBanter: Jan 2007
Posts: 146
Default Peak Oil and Amateur Radio

On Jul 4, 2:04 am, "Frank Dresser"
wrote:
"What would a viable long-distance communications network in the age of peak
oil look like? To begin with, it would use the airwaves rather than land
lines, to minimize infrastructure, and its energy needs would be modest
enough to be met by local renewable sources."

http://peakoil.com/modules.php?name=...icle&sid=40585

Frank Dresser


Fascinating article. Of course, it's much more likely that leaving
oil behind in the next 30-50 years will result in net economic and
health benefits, not economic ruin, given the proper priority to solar
thermal, nuclear, wind, and solar electric technologies. History
shows that large research efforts tend to spin off major economic
benefits in terms of breakthroughs, process improvements, new
products, and other positive externalities. (For example, an economy
based on making carbon neutral fuel (like H2) from renewable or at
least nuclear electricity would have little or no smog, with
correspondingly fewer respiratory illnesses and deaths than our
current regime.)

But it *is* really sobering to realize how FRAGILE our technology is,
because it's so interconnected and requires so many specialists to
maintain, let alone extend, the state of the art. It's good to know
that there are people among us who do for a hobby, something that
really can do the job with technology that can be preserved and passed
on. If there's one thing I don't worry about in a post-collapse
world, we will be able to pass news and communications along via radio
and remain *at least* as in touch as someone in 1930 would have been.
Or much better if the collapse was slow enough to give us some time to
prepare.
  #3   Report Post  
Old July 4th 08, 02:54 PM posted to rec.radio.shortwave
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by RadioBanter: Jun 2008
Posts: 1,183
Default Peak Oil and Amateur Radio

Frank Dresser wrote:
"What would a viable long-distance communications network in the age of peak
oil look like? To begin with, it would use the airwaves rather than land
lines, to minimize infrastructure, and its energy needs would be modest
enough to be met by local renewable sources."

http://peakoil.com/modules.php?name=...icle&sid=40585

Frank Dresser


There is no shortage of crude oil.
  #4   Report Post  
Old July 5th 08, 05:19 AM posted to rec.radio.shortwave
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by RadioBanter: Jan 2007
Posts: 146
Default Peak Oil and Amateur Radio

On Jul 4, 1:54 pm, Dave wrote:
Frank Dresser wrote:
"What would a viable long-distance communications network in the age of peak
oil look like? To begin with, it would use the airwaves rather than land
lines, to minimize infrastructure, and its energy needs would be modest
enough to be met by local renewable sources."


http://peakoil.com/modules.php?name=...icle&sid=40585


Frank Dresser


There is no shortage of crude oil.


It's irrelevant whether there is a shortage of crude oil.

First, it's an issue of supply and demand, with demand growing far
faster than supply, and older wells do not produce nearly as quickly
as they did when new.

Second, even if major new finds were discovered, oil is no longer a
feasible source of energy going much past 20 years or so into the
future. It's well established, and the science is solid and
universally accepted by mainstream science, that humans are
destabilizing the climate beyond limits explained by natural
processes, with unknown but almost certainly dire consequences in the
long run, especially if natural processes start to run in the same
warming direction as man-made ones currently are.

There's no controversy about this. Really, there's not. Ask an
expert.



Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
AMATEUR RADIO NEWSLINE™ ANNOUNCES CREATION OF THE ROY NEAL, K6DUE, AMATEUR RADIO MENTORING PROJECT Radionews CB 0 January 30th 04 10:01 AM
AMATEUR RADIO NEWSLINE™ ANNOUNCES CREATION OF THE ROY NEAL, K6DUE, AMATEUR RADIO MENTORING PROJECT Radionews General 0 January 30th 04 10:00 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 01:31 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2019 RadioBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Radio"

 

Copyright © 2017