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Old September 9th 18, 10:23 PM posted to uk.radio.amateur,rec.radio.amateur.antenna
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Posts: 25
Default Earth Rods?

On 9/5/2018 3:11 PM, Gareth's Downstairs Computer wrote:
On 05/09/2018 20:34, Roger Hayter wrote:
Gareth's Downstairs Computer
wrote:

On 05/09/2018 17:11, Spike wrote:
On 04/09/2018 21:27, Roger Hayter wrote:
Gareth's Downstairs Computer
wrote:

Is there a trick, or kink, or wrinkle, for putting in
an earth stake with the knowledge that it will go all the way
down (3 feet) into the ground without hitting an obstacle
so leaving you with a problem stake that is only half way in
but held so firmly by the soil that you cannot get it out?

A 1 metre SDS masonry drill helps. To get the old one out a pipe
wrench
can be useful, and possibly a slide hammer.

In the days when I was into putting in earth stakes, I developed a
routine that tended to avoid unfortunate happenings - learned the hard
way, of course. The idea was to take a 4' solid aluminium-alloy rod,
then turn a point at one end and drill and tap a thread at the other
for
a screw terminal. The next requirement was for a pint or so of soapy
water and the most powerful mains-electric drill I could find, and then
secure the terminal end of the rod in the chuck. Locate the spot where
the earth stake was to go, and scoop a small 'funnel' out of the earth,
into which the soapy water was poured. The point of the rod was then
placed in the centre of the funnel, the drill started, and using only
minimal pressure and a fairly low drill speed, press the rod into the
ground. Sometimes the rod would go in to the right depth, and sometimes
it would hit a solid obstruction. In the latter case it was
important to
keep the drill rotating while easing the rod back out of the soil and
then repeating the process close by until the desired result was
obtained.



Thanks, muchly.microbore copper tubingr

But needs to be a pretty big lathe to turn a 4 ft rod.


Merely¬* the usual hollow shaft through the headstock holding the chuck,
and 4 ft of space behind the headstock.¬* (Or a temporary hole in the
wall if necessary!)


That's a neat idea; must try that!

But beware! A rod through the headstock, something I have had to do for
quite a few projects, must be turned very slowly compared to what you
probably want for something so small in diameter. The "outboard" part,
probably a fairly long piece of metal that might be just 1/2" thick or
less, if turned rapidly, will start whipping around. It can be very
dangerous both to the operator and to whatever you have behind the lathe!
When we sold our previous house I had to explain why there were marks
all over a door from the main part of the basement, my shop, to a part I
had walled off for storage. I don't remember what I had been turning,
but within a small part of a second it was whipping around all over and
scaring the $%$^ out of me, before I could hit power off!
Bob Wilson, WA9D

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Old September 9th 18, 10:32 PM posted to uk.radio.amateur,rec.radio.amateur.antenna
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First recorded activity by RadioBanter: Jan 2015
Posts: 181
Default Earth Rods?

Bob Wilson wrote:

On 9/5/2018 3:11 PM, Gareth's Downstairs Computer wrote:
On 05/09/2018 20:34, Roger Hayter wrote:
Gareth's Downstairs Computer
wrote:

On 05/09/2018 17:11, Spike wrote:
On 04/09/2018 21:27, Roger Hayter wrote:
Gareth's Downstairs Computer
wrote:

Is there a trick, or kink, or wrinkle, for putting in
an earth stake with the knowledge that it will go all the way
down (3 feet) into the ground without hitting an obstacle
so leaving you with a problem stake that is only half way in
but held so firmly by the soil that you cannot get it out?

A 1 metre SDS masonry drill helps. To get the old one out a pipe
wrench
can be useful, and possibly a slide hammer.

In the days when I was into putting in earth stakes, I developed a
routine that tended to avoid unfortunate happenings - learned the hard
way, of course. The idea was to take a 4' solid aluminium-alloy rod,
then turn a point at one end and drill and tap a thread at the other
for
a screw terminal. The next requirement was for a pint or so of soapy
water and the most powerful mains-electric drill I could find, and then
secure the terminal end of the rod in the chuck. Locate the spot where
the earth stake was to go, and scoop a small 'funnel' out of the earth,
into which the soapy water was poured. The point of the rod was then
placed in the centre of the funnel, the drill started, and using only
minimal pressure and a fairly low drill speed, press the rod into the
ground. Sometimes the rod would go in to the right depth, and sometimes
it would hit a solid obstruction. In the latter case it was
important to
keep the drill rotating while easing the rod back out of the soil and
then repeating the process close by until the desired result was
obtained.



Thanks, muchly.microbore copper tubingr

But needs to be a pretty big lathe to turn a 4 ft rod.

Merely the usual hollow shaft through the headstock holding the chuck,
and 4 ft of space behind the headstock. (Or a temporary hole in the
wall if necessary!)


That's a neat idea; must try that!

But beware! A rod through the headstock, something I have had to do for
quite a few projects, must be turned very slowly compared to what you
probably want for something so small in diameter. The "outboard" part,
probably a fairly long piece of metal that might be just 1/2" thick or
less, if turned rapidly, will start whipping around. It can be very
dangerous both to the operator and to whatever you have behind the lathe!
When we sold our previous house I had to explain why there were marks
all over a door from the main part of the basement, my shop, to a part I
had walled off for storage. I don't remember what I had been turning,
but within a small part of a second it was whipping around all over and
scaring the $%$^ out of me, before I could hit power off!
Bob Wilson, WA9D


Yes. Some sort of crude guide bearing (possibly wooden and clamped to a
bench) at the far end is a good idea too. But I second the going slow,
you don't want the guide to become a projectile.

--

Roger Hayter


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