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Old September 4th 18, 06:52 PM posted to uk.radio.amateur,rec.radio.amateur.antenna
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Default Earth Rods?

Is there a trick, or kink, or wrinkle, for putting in
an earth stake with the knowledge that it will go all the way
down (3 feet) into the ground without hitting an obstacle
so leaving you with a problem stake that is only half way in
but held so firmly by the soil that you cannot get it out?

(and thereby hangs a tale (tail?), for I have such a stake
with an inverted bottle over it to circumvent the taking
out of one's eye)

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Old September 4th 18, 10:27 PM posted to uk.radio.amateur,rec.radio.amateur.antenna
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Default Earth Rods?

Gareth's Downstairs Computer
wrote:

Is there a trick, or kink, or wrinkle, for putting in
an earth stake with the knowledge that it will go all the way
down (3 feet) into the ground without hitting an obstacle
so leaving you with a problem stake that is only half way in
but held so firmly by the soil that you cannot get it out?

(and thereby hangs a tale (tail?), for I have such a stake
with an inverted bottle over it to circumvent the taking
out of one's eye)


A 1metre SDS masonry drill helps. To get the old one out a pipe wrench
can be useful, and possibly a slide hammer.

--

Roger Hayter
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Old September 5th 18, 07:20 AM posted to uk.radio.amateur,rec.radio.amateur.antenna
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Default Earth Rods?

On 04/09/2018 22:27, Roger Hayter wrote:
Gareth's Downstairs Computer
wrote:

Is there a trick, or kink, or wrinkle, for putting in
an earth stake with the knowledge that it will go all the way
down (3 feet) into the ground without hitting an obstacle
so leaving you with a problem stake that is only half way in
but held so firmly by the soil that you cannot get it out?

(and thereby hangs a tale (tail?), for I have such a stake
with an inverted bottle over it to circumvent the taking
out of one's eye)


A 1metre SDS masonry drill helps. To get the old one out a pipe wrench
can be useful, and possibly a slide hammer.


You learn something everyday for I'd never heard of a slide hammer.

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Old September 5th 18, 09:10 AM posted to uk.radio.amateur,rec.radio.amateur.antenna
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Posts: 155
Default Earth Rods?


"Gareth's Downstairs Computer"
wrote in message
news
On 04/09/2018 22:27, Roger Hayter wrote:
Gareth's Downstairs Computer
wrote:

Is there a trick, or kink, or wrinkle, for putting in
an earth stake with the knowledge that it will go all the way
down (3 feet) into the ground without hitting an obstacle
so leaving you with a problem stake that is only half way in
but held so firmly by the soil that you cannot get it out?

(and thereby hangs a tale (tail?), for I have such a stake
with an inverted bottle over it to circumvent the taking
out of one's eye)


A 1metre SDS masonry drill helps. To get the old one out a pipe wrench
can be useful, and possibly a slide hammer.


You learn something everyday for I'd never heard of a slide hammer.


it is a hammer which slides ....


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Old September 5th 18, 10:31 AM posted to uk.radio.amateur,rec.radio.amateur.antenna
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Posts: 209
Default Earth Rods?

On 05/09/2018 09:10, Jim GM4DHJ ... wrote:
"Gareth's Downstairs Computer"
wrote in message
news
On 04/09/2018 22:27, Roger Hayter wrote:
Gareth's Downstairs Computer
wrote:

Is there a trick, or kink, or wrinkle, for putting in
an earth stake with the knowledge that it will go all the way
down (3 feet) into the ground without hitting an obstacle
so leaving you with a problem stake that is only half way in
but held so firmly by the soil that you cannot get it out?

(and thereby hangs a tale (tail?), for I have such a stake
with an inverted bottle over it to circumvent the taking
out of one's eye)

A 1metre SDS masonry drill helps. To get the old one out a pipe wrench
can be useful, and possibly a slide hammer.


You learn something everyday for I'd never heard of a slide hammer.


it is a hammer which slides ....



And therefore quite different to a hammerfor?



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Old September 5th 18, 05:11 PM posted to uk.radio.amateur,rec.radio.amateur.antenna
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Posts: 180
Default Earth Rods?

On 04/09/2018 21:27, Roger Hayter wrote:
Gareth's Downstairs Computer
wrote:


Is there a trick, or kink, or wrinkle, for putting in
an earth stake with the knowledge that it will go all the way
down (3 feet) into the ground without hitting an obstacle
so leaving you with a problem stake that is only half way in
but held so firmly by the soil that you cannot get it out?


A 1 metre SDS masonry drill helps. To get the old one out a pipe wrench
can be useful, and possibly a slide hammer.


In the days when I was into putting in earth stakes, I developed a
routine that tended to avoid unfortunate happenings - learned the hard
way, of course. The idea was to take a 4' solid aluminium-alloy rod,
then turn a point at one end and drill and tap a thread at the other for
a screw terminal. The next requirement was for a pint or so of soapy
water and the most powerful mains-electric drill I could find, and then
secure the terminal end of the rod in the chuck. Locate the spot where
the earth stake was to go, and scoop a small 'funnel' out of the earth,
into which the soapy water was poured. The point of the rod was then
placed in the centre of the funnel, the drill started, and using only
minimal pressure and a fairly low drill speed, press the rod into the
ground. Sometimes the rod would go in to the right depth, and sometimes
it would hit a solid obstruction. In the latter case it was important to
keep the drill rotating while easing the rod back out of the soil and
then repeating the process close by until the desired result was obtained.


--
Spike

A government policy document notes that “all information about an
honours nominee, received from any source, is treated in the strictest
confidence by the Honours and Appointments Secretariat and others
involved in the assessment and selection of honours nominees”.

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Old September 5th 18, 06:04 PM posted to uk.radio.amateur,rec.radio.amateur.antenna
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First recorded activity by RadioBanter: Mar 2017
Posts: 209
Default Earth Rods?

On 05/09/2018 17:11, Spike wrote:
On 04/09/2018 21:27, Roger Hayter wrote:
Gareth's Downstairs Computer
wrote:


Is there a trick, or kink, or wrinkle, for putting in
an earth stake with the knowledge that it will go all the way
down (3 feet) into the ground without hitting an obstacle
so leaving you with a problem stake that is only half way in
but held so firmly by the soil that you cannot get it out?


A 1 metre SDS masonry drill helps. To get the old one out a pipe wrench
can be useful, and possibly a slide hammer.


In the days when I was into putting in earth stakes, I developed a
routine that tended to avoid unfortunate happenings - learned the hard
way, of course. The idea was to take a 4' solid aluminium-alloy rod,
then turn a point at one end and drill and tap a thread at the other for
a screw terminal. The next requirement was for a pint or so of soapy
water and the most powerful mains-electric drill I could find, and then
secure the terminal end of the rod in the chuck. Locate the spot where
the earth stake was to go, and scoop a small 'funnel' out of the earth,
into which the soapy water was poured. The point of the rod was then
placed in the centre of the funnel, the drill started, and using only
minimal pressure and a fairly low drill speed, press the rod into the
ground. Sometimes the rod would go in to the right depth, and sometimes
it would hit a solid obstruction. In the latter case it was important to
keep the drill rotating while easing the rod back out of the soil and
then repeating the process close by until the desired result was obtained.



Thanks, muchly.

But needs to be a pretty big lathe to turn a 4 ft rod.
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Old September 5th 18, 06:41 PM posted to uk.radio.amateur,rec.radio.amateur.antenna
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Default Earth Rods?

In article ,
Gareth's Downstairs Computer
wrote:

On 05/09/2018 17:11, Spike wrote:
On 04/09/2018 21:27, Roger Hayter wrote:
Gareth's Downstairs Computer
wrote:


Is there a trick, or kink, or wrinkle, for putting in
an earth stake with the knowledge that it will go all the way
down (3 feet) into the ground without hitting an obstacle
so leaving you with a problem stake that is only half way in
but held so firmly by the soil that you cannot get it out?


A 1 metre SDS masonry drill helps. To get the old one out a pipe wrench
can be useful, and possibly a slide hammer.


In the days when I was into putting in earth stakes, I developed a
routine that tended to avoid unfortunate happenings - learned the hard
way, of course. The idea was to take a 4' solid aluminium-alloy rod,
then turn a point at one end and drill and tap a thread at the other for
a screw terminal. The next requirement was for a pint or so of soapy
water and the most powerful mains-electric drill I could find, and then
secure the terminal end of the rod in the chuck. Locate the spot where
the earth stake was to go, and scoop a small 'funnel' out of the earth,
into which the soapy water was poured. The point of the rod was then
placed in the centre of the funnel, the drill started, and using only
minimal pressure and a fairly low drill speed, press the rod into the
ground. Sometimes the rod would go in to the right depth, and sometimes
it would hit a solid obstruction. In the latter case it was important to
keep the drill rotating while easing the rod back out of the soil and
then repeating the process close by until the desired result was obtained.


Gareth-

A fellow Ham once showed me how to do that with a battery-powered
electric drill. I do not remember him using any water. He was in the
outdoor area of a Hamfest. He used the same drill to remove the ground
when the Hamfest was over. I do not recall the diameter of the ground
rod, but his drill fit it.

Around here, 3 or 4 feet may not be long enough for good ground
connectivity. But it beats having no protection at all!

Fred
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Old September 5th 18, 08:34 PM posted to uk.radio.amateur,rec.radio.amateur.antenna
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Posts: 181
Default Earth Rods?

Gareth's Downstairs Computer
wrote:

On 05/09/2018 17:11, Spike wrote:
On 04/09/2018 21:27, Roger Hayter wrote:
Gareth's Downstairs Computer
wrote:


Is there a trick, or kink, or wrinkle, for putting in
an earth stake with the knowledge that it will go all the way
down (3 feet) into the ground without hitting an obstacle
so leaving you with a problem stake that is only half way in
but held so firmly by the soil that you cannot get it out?


A 1 metre SDS masonry drill helps. To get the old one out a pipe wrench
can be useful, and possibly a slide hammer.


In the days when I was into putting in earth stakes, I developed a
routine that tended to avoid unfortunate happenings - learned the hard
way, of course. The idea was to take a 4' solid aluminium-alloy rod,
then turn a point at one end and drill and tap a thread at the other for
a screw terminal. The next requirement was for a pint or so of soapy
water and the most powerful mains-electric drill I could find, and then
secure the terminal end of the rod in the chuck. Locate the spot where
the earth stake was to go, and scoop a small 'funnel' out of the earth,
into which the soapy water was poured. The point of the rod was then
placed in the centre of the funnel, the drill started, and using only
minimal pressure and a fairly low drill speed, press the rod into the
ground. Sometimes the rod would go in to the right depth, and sometimes
it would hit a solid obstruction. In the latter case it was important to
keep the drill rotating while easing the rod back out of the soil and
then repeating the process close by until the desired result was obtained.



Thanks, muchly.

But needs to be a pretty big lathe to turn a 4 ft rod.


Merely the usual hollow shaft through the headstock holding the chuck,
and 4 ft of space behind the headstock. (Or a temporary hole in the
wall if necessary!)

--

Roger Hayter
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Old September 5th 18, 09:11 PM posted to uk.radio.amateur,rec.radio.amateur.antenna
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First recorded activity by RadioBanter: Mar 2017
Posts: 209
Default Earth Rods?

On 05/09/2018 20:34, Roger Hayter wrote:
Gareth's Downstairs Computer
wrote:

On 05/09/2018 17:11, Spike wrote:
On 04/09/2018 21:27, Roger Hayter wrote:
Gareth's Downstairs Computer
wrote:

Is there a trick, or kink, or wrinkle, for putting in
an earth stake with the knowledge that it will go all the way
down (3 feet) into the ground without hitting an obstacle
so leaving you with a problem stake that is only half way in
but held so firmly by the soil that you cannot get it out?

A 1 metre SDS masonry drill helps. To get the old one out a pipe wrench
can be useful, and possibly a slide hammer.

In the days when I was into putting in earth stakes, I developed a
routine that tended to avoid unfortunate happenings - learned the hard
way, of course. The idea was to take a 4' solid aluminium-alloy rod,
then turn a point at one end and drill and tap a thread at the other for
a screw terminal. The next requirement was for a pint or so of soapy
water and the most powerful mains-electric drill I could find, and then
secure the terminal end of the rod in the chuck. Locate the spot where
the earth stake was to go, and scoop a small 'funnel' out of the earth,
into which the soapy water was poured. The point of the rod was then
placed in the centre of the funnel, the drill started, and using only
minimal pressure and a fairly low drill speed, press the rod into the
ground. Sometimes the rod would go in to the right depth, and sometimes
it would hit a solid obstruction. In the latter case it was important to
keep the drill rotating while easing the rod back out of the soil and
then repeating the process close by until the desired result was obtained.



Thanks, muchly.

But needs to be a pretty big lathe to turn a 4 ft rod.


Merely the usual hollow shaft through the headstock holding the chuck,
and 4 ft of space behind the headstock. (Or a temporary hole in the
wall if necessary!)


That's a neat idea; must try that!



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