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Old June 10th 12, 02:32 PM posted to rec.radio.cb
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Default Echo Charlie frequencies

does any use any of the Ech Charlie frequencies?

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Old June 10th 12, 10:00 PM posted to rec.radio.cb
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Posts: 111
Default Echo Charlie frequencies

G.Shepherd wrote:
does any use any of the Ech Charlie frequencies?


What are they?

I use CB frequencies.
  #3   Report Post  
Old June 10th 12, 10:05 PM posted to rec.radio.cb
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First recorded activity by RadioBanter: Dec 2008
Posts: 111
Default Echo Charlie frequencies

G.Shepherd wrote:
does any use any of the Echo Charlie frequencies?


Not risking my extra ticket...
https://www.radiobanter.com/policy/101215-re-echo-charlie-frequency-information.html

"Echo Charlie" frequency bands

Not many North American radio hobbyists are aware of the "Echo
Charlie" bands. They are CB type "freebands" in different parts
of the HF spectrum. There hasn't been much activity here in North
America up to 2006 (but that is changing!). There has been, for some
time, activity in Europe. Check the following frequency ranges:

85 meter band: 3.450 - 3.495 MHz LSB. This Echo Charlie band's
calling channel is 3.475 LSB. The band is about 25 kHz either side of
the call frequency, with occasional traffic from the UK, Germany, and
Holland appearing. There's heavy QRM at times from utility
(commercial/military) traffic. Avoid interference with what you may
hear, and never, ever attempt communication with any "official"
traffic! TAKE CARE!

*45 meter band: 6.600 - 6.700 MHz LSB. This is an Echo Charlie range
of frequencies with the calling frequency of 6.670 LSB. It's a good
band for European traffic. There are often lots of stations from the
UK, Germany, France, the Netherlands, and Belgium. Some stations are
running power as low as 2 to 5 watts, with other stations reportedly
running up to 1,000 watts. Again, there are utility stations in this
area (like long range air traffic control!). NEVER GO TO USB! This is
very important!*

22 meter band: This band has also been experimented with. Channels
such as 12.105, 12.130, 12.160, and up to 12.256 MHz have been used,
with any clear spots in between. (The originator of this information
did not indicate mode, but one would think it is USB.)

21 meter band: This band runs from 13.630 - 13.995 MHz, and modes are
AM/USB. It has transcontinental traffic and is only used occasionally.
13.360 - 13.960 MHz is the main hobby pirate broadcasting range.
There is also an international CB band where the calling frequency is
13.995 MHz. (In the U.S.A., 13.995 is NOT recommended for CB type
communication due to military and MARS traffic! Instead, U.S. stations
are encouraged to use 13.555 MHz USB, which is a Part 15 allocation.)
Refer to FCC rules and regulations as to what constitutes Part 15
stations.

Non-government frequencies in the U.S.A.

Few U.S. radio hobbyists are also aware of the following frequency
ranges that are listed as "non-government exclusive" by the FCC.
(The Citizen's Band, and most Ham bands are examples of
non-government exclusive allocations.) These are generally considered
"safe" areas around 12, 11, and 10 meters for Freebanding.
1) 25.010 - 25.070 MHz -- use CB antenna & tuner
2) 25.210 - 25.330 MHz -- use CB antenna & tuner
3) 26.175 - 26.480 MHz
4) 26.950 - 26.960 MHz
5) 27.410 - 27.540 MHz
6) 29.700 - 29.890 MHz
7) 29.910 - 30.000 MHz

-- (Also, a number of freeband stations have been known to use HF
marine frequencies.) --


*In Europe this has been a 'pirate' band for many years, referred to by
the
users as '45 meters'. Users seem to be radio enthusiasts , often ex
27Mhz
SSB operators who use this as an alternative band. This 'band' appears
to
extend from around 6600 Khz to 6700. There is a 'calling frequency ' on
6670Khz where you will often hear stations calling 'CQ45'. Similar nets
also
seem to take place just below 3500Khz.

Additionally, it has been reported that 18.030 MHz LSB has been in use
  #4   Report Post  
Old June 12th 12, 02:02 PM
Senior Member
 
First recorded activity by RadioBanter: Jan 2011
Posts: 388
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott in Baltimore[_2_] View Post
G.Shepherd wrote:
does any use any of the Echo Charlie frequencies?


Not risking my extra ticket...
http://www.radiobanter.com/showthread.php?t=101215

"Echo Charlie" frequency bands

Not many North American radio hobbyists are aware of the "Echo
Charlie" bands. They are CB type "freebands" in different parts
of the HF spectrum. There hasn't been much activity here in North
America up to 2006 (but that is changing!). There has been, for some
time, activity in Europe. Check the following frequency ranges:

85 meter band: 3.450 - 3.495 MHz LSB. This Echo Charlie band's
calling channel is 3.475 LSB. The band is about 25 kHz either side of
the call frequency, with occasional traffic from the UK, Germany, and
Holland appearing. There's heavy QRM at times from utility
(commercial/military) traffic. Avoid interference with what you may
hear, and never, ever attempt communication with any "official"
traffic! TAKE CARE!

*45 meter band: 6.600 - 6.700 MHz LSB. This is an Echo Charlie range
of frequencies with the calling frequency of 6.670 LSB. It's a good
band for European traffic. There are often lots of stations from the
UK, Germany, France, the Netherlands, and Belgium. Some stations are
running power as low as 2 to 5 watts, with other stations reportedly
running up to 1,000 watts. Again, there are utility stations in this
area (like long range air traffic control!). NEVER GO TO USB! This is
very important!*

22 meter band: This band has also been experimented with. Channels
such as 12.105, 12.130, 12.160, and up to 12.256 MHz have been used,
with any clear spots in between. (The originator of this information
did not indicate mode, but one would think it is USB.)

21 meter band: This band runs from 13.630 - 13.995 MHz, and modes are
AM/USB. It has transcontinental traffic and is only used occasionally.
13.360 - 13.960 MHz is the main hobby pirate broadcasting range.
There is also an international CB band where the calling frequency is
13.995 MHz. (In the U.S.A., 13.995 is NOT recommended for CB type
communication due to military and MARS traffic! Instead, U.S. stations
are encouraged to use 13.555 MHz USB, which is a Part 15 allocation.)
Refer to FCC rules and regulations as to what constitutes Part 15
stations.

Non-government frequencies in the U.S.A.

Few U.S. radio hobbyists are also aware of the following frequency
ranges that are listed as "non-government exclusive" by the FCC.
(The Citizen's Band, and most Ham bands are examples of
non-government exclusive allocations.) These are generally considered
"safe" areas around 12, 11, and 10 meters for Freebanding.
1) 25.010 - 25.070 MHz -- use CB antenna & tuner
2) 25.210 - 25.330 MHz -- use CB antenna & tuner
3) 26.175 - 26.480 MHz
4) 26.950 - 26.960 MHz
5) 27.410 - 27.540 MHz
6) 29.700 - 29.890 MHz
7) 29.910 - 30.000 MHz

-- (Also, a number of freeband stations have been known to use HF
marine frequencies.) --


*In Europe this has been a 'pirate' band for many years, referred to by
the
users as '45 meters'. Users seem to be radio enthusiasts , often ex
27Mhz
SSB operators who use this as an alternative band. This 'band' appears
to
extend from around 6600 Khz to 6700. There is a 'calling frequency ' on
6670Khz where you will often hear stations calling 'CQ45'. Similar nets
also
seem to take place just below 3500Khz.

Additionally, it has been reported that 18.030 MHz LSB has been in use
In the United States operating anywhere other then the CB radio frequencies, or GMRS - 1 watt / FRS .5 watt will get you in a lot of trouble.

You must possess a FCC license to operate on HF bands and if the HF band is not allocated for operation, operation there is illegal....

The only other place you can operate - again with a license is the MARS Frequencies.
  #5   Report Post  
Old June 14th 12, 06:55 AM posted to rec.radio.cb
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by RadioBanter: Jun 2012
Posts: 8
Default Echo Charlie frequencies

On Tue, 12 Jun 2012 13:02:14 +0000, Channel Jumper
wrote:


'Scott in Baltimore[_2_ Wrote:
;791832']G.Shepherd wrote:-
does any use any of the Echo Charlie frequencies?-

Not risking my extra ticket...
http://www.radiobanter.com/showthread.php?t=101215

"Echo Charlie" frequency bands

Not many North American radio hobbyists are aware of the "Echo
Charlie" bands. They are CB type "freebands" in different parts
of the HF spectrum. There hasn't been much activity here in North
America up to 2006 (but that is changing!). There has been, for some
time, activity in Europe. Check the following frequency ranges:

85 meter band: 3.450 - 3.495 MHz LSB. This Echo Charlie band's
calling channel is 3.475 LSB. The band is about 25 kHz either side of
the call frequency, with occasional traffic from the UK, Germany, and
Holland appearing. There's heavy QRM at times from utility
(commercial/military) traffic. Avoid interference with what you may
hear, and never, ever attempt communication with any "official"
traffic! TAKE CARE!

*45 meter band: 6.600 - 6.700 MHz LSB. This is an Echo Charlie range
of frequencies with the calling frequency of 6.670 LSB. It's a good
band for European traffic. There are often lots of stations from the
UK, Germany, France, the Netherlands, and Belgium. Some stations are
running power as low as 2 to 5 watts, with other stations reportedly
running up to 1,000 watts. Again, there are utility stations in this
area (like long range air traffic control!). NEVER GO TO USB! This is
very important!*

22 meter band: This band has also been experimented with. Channels
such as 12.105, 12.130, 12.160, and up to 12.256 MHz have been used,
with any clear spots in between. (The originator of this information
did not indicate mode, but one would think it is USB.)

21 meter band: This band runs from 13.630 - 13.995 MHz, and modes are
AM/USB. It has transcontinental traffic and is only used occasionally.
13.360 - 13.960 MHz is the main hobby pirate broadcasting range.
There is also an international CB band where the calling frequency is
13.995 MHz. (In the U.S.A., 13.995 is NOT recommended for CB type
communication due to military and MARS traffic! Instead, U.S. stations
are encouraged to use 13.555 MHz USB, which is a Part 15 allocation.)
Refer to FCC rules and regulations as to what constitutes Part 15
stations.

Non-government frequencies in the U.S.A.

Few U.S. radio hobbyists are also aware of the following frequency
ranges that are listed as "non-government exclusive" by the FCC.
(The Citizen's Band, and most Ham bands are examples of
non-government exclusive allocations.) These are generally considered
"safe" areas around 12, 11, and 10 meters for Freebanding.
1) 25.010 - 25.070 MHz -- use CB antenna & tuner
2) 25.210 - 25.330 MHz -- use CB antenna & tuner
3) 26.175 - 26.480 MHz
4) 26.950 - 26.960 MHz
5) 27.410 - 27.540 MHz
6) 29.700 - 29.890 MHz
7) 29.910 - 30.000 MHz

-- (Also, a number of freeband stations have been known to use HF
marine frequencies.) --


*In Europe this has been a 'pirate' band for many years, referred to by
the
users as '45 meters'. Users seem to be radio enthusiasts , often ex
27Mhz
SSB operators who use this as an alternative band. This 'band' appears
to
extend from around 6600 Khz to 6700. There is a 'calling frequency ' on
6670Khz where you will often hear stations calling 'CQ45'. Similar nets
also
seem to take place just below 3500Khz.

Additionally, it has been reported that 18.030 MHz LSB has been in use


In the United States operating anywhere other then the CB radio
frequencies, or GMRS - 1 watt / FRS .5 watt will get you in a lot of
trouble.

You must possess a FCC license to operate on HF bands and if the HF band
is not allocated for operation, operation there is illegal....

The only other place you can operate - again with a license is the MARS
Frequencies.

....................
Whatever


  #6   Report Post  
Old June 21st 12, 07:23 PM posted to rec.radio.cb
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by RadioBanter: Jun 2012
Posts: 1
Default Echo Charlie frequencies


" ...................
Whatever"


excellent answer ;)
  #7   Report Post  
Old June 30th 12, 01:10 AM posted to rec.radio.cb
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by RadioBanter: Jul 2010
Posts: 22
Default Echo Charlie frequencies

On Jun 12, 9:02*am, Channel Jumper
wrote:
'Scott in Baltimore[_2_ Wrote:









;791832']G.Shepherd wrote:-
does any use any of the Echo Charlie frequencies?-


Not risking my extra ticket...
http://www.radiobanter.com/showthread.php?t=101215


"Echo Charlie" frequency bands


Not many North American radio hobbyists are aware of the "Echo
Charlie" bands. They are CB type "freebands" in different parts
of the HF spectrum. There hasn't been much activity here in North
America up to 2006 (but that is changing!). There has been, for some
time, activity in Europe. Check the following frequency ranges:


85 meter band: 3.450 - 3.495 MHz LSB. This Echo Charlie band's
calling channel is 3.475 LSB. The band is about 25 kHz either side of
the call frequency, with occasional traffic from the UK, Germany, and
Holland appearing. There's heavy QRM at times from utility
(commercial/military) traffic. Avoid interference with what you may
hear, and never, ever attempt communication with any "official"
traffic! TAKE CARE!


*45 meter band: 6.600 - 6.700 MHz LSB. This is an Echo Charlie range
of frequencies with the calling frequency of 6.670 LSB. It's a good
band for European traffic. There are often lots of stations from the
UK, Germany, France, the Netherlands, and Belgium. Some stations are
running power as low as 2 to 5 watts, with other stations reportedly
running up to 1,000 watts. Again, there are utility stations in this
area (like long range air traffic control!). NEVER GO TO USB! This is
very important!*


22 meter band: This band has also been experimented with. Channels
such as 12.105, 12.130, 12.160, and up to 12.256 MHz have been used,
with any clear spots in between. (The originator of this information
did not indicate mode, but one would think it is USB.)


21 meter band: This band runs from 13.630 - 13.995 MHz, and modes are
AM/USB. It has transcontinental traffic and is only used occasionally.
13.360 - 13.960 MHz is the main hobby pirate broadcasting range.
There is also an international CB band where the calling frequency is
13.995 MHz. (In the U.S.A., 13.995 is NOT recommended for CB type
communication due to military and MARS traffic! Instead, U.S. stations
are encouraged to use 13.555 MHz USB, which is a Part 15 allocation.)
Refer to FCC rules and regulations as to what constitutes Part 15
stations.


Non-government frequencies in the U.S.A.


Few U.S. radio hobbyists are also aware of the following frequency
ranges that are listed as "non-government exclusive" by the FCC.
(The Citizen's Band, and most Ham bands are examples of
non-government exclusive allocations.) These are generally considered
"safe" areas around 12, 11, and 10 meters for Freebanding.
1) 25.010 - 25.070 MHz -- use CB antenna & tuner
2) 25.210 - 25.330 MHz -- use CB antenna & tuner
3) 26.175 - 26.480 MHz
4) 26.950 - 26.960 MHz
5) 27.410 - 27.540 MHz
6) 29.700 - 29.890 MHz
7) 29.910 - 30.000 MHz


-- (Also, a number of freeband stations have been known to use HF
marine frequencies.) --


*In Europe this has been a 'pirate' band for many years, referred to by
the
users as '45 meters'. Users seem to be radio enthusiasts , often ex
27Mhz
SSB operators who use this as an alternative band. This 'band' appears
to
extend from around 6600 Khz to 6700. There is a 'calling frequency ' on
6670Khz where you will often hear stations calling 'CQ45'. Similar nets
also
seem to take place just below 3500Khz.


Additionally, it has been reported that 18.030 MHz LSB has been in use


In the United States operating anywhere other then the CB radio
frequencies, or GMRS - 1 watt / FRS .5 watt will get you in a lot of
trouble.

You must possess a FCC license to operate on HF bands and if the HF band
is not allocated for operation, operation there is illegal....

The only other place you can operate - again with a license is the MARS
Frequencies.

--
Channel Jumper



Um, no, it won't result in "a lot of trouble." It will result,
usually, in the enjoyment of talking with other similar-minded radio
enthusiasts. Don't blow a lot of power and splatter the frequency and
you'll be fine. Here's a link to an international DX group making
great use of some of the freeband, they've been at it for many years
and have many members here in the U.S.
  #8   Report Post  
Old June 30th 12, 01:15 AM posted to rec.radio.cb
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by RadioBanter: Jul 2010
Posts: 22
Default Echo Charlie frequencies

On Jun 29, 8:10*pm, Twisted wrote:
On Jun 12, 9:02*am, Channel Jumper









wrote:
'Scott in Baltimore[_2_ Wrote:


;791832']G.Shepherd wrote:-
does any use any of the Echo Charlie frequencies?-


Not risking my extra ticket...
http://www.radiobanter.com/showthread.php?t=101215


"Echo Charlie" frequency bands


Not many North American radio hobbyists are aware of the "Echo
Charlie" bands. They are CB type "freebands" in different parts
of the HF spectrum. There hasn't been much activity here in North
America up to 2006 (but that is changing!). There has been, for some
time, activity in Europe. Check the following frequency ranges:


85 meter band: 3.450 - 3.495 MHz LSB. This Echo Charlie band's
calling channel is 3.475 LSB. The band is about 25 kHz either side of
the call frequency, with occasional traffic from the UK, Germany, and
Holland appearing. There's heavy QRM at times from utility
(commercial/military) traffic. Avoid interference with what you may
hear, and never, ever attempt communication with any "official"
traffic! TAKE CARE!


*45 meter band: 6.600 - 6.700 MHz LSB. This is an Echo Charlie range
of frequencies with the calling frequency of 6.670 LSB. It's a good
band for European traffic. There are often lots of stations from the
UK, Germany, France, the Netherlands, and Belgium. Some stations are
running power as low as 2 to 5 watts, with other stations reportedly
running up to 1,000 watts. Again, there are utility stations in this
area (like long range air traffic control!). NEVER GO TO USB! This is
very important!*


22 meter band: This band has also been experimented with. Channels
such as 12.105, 12.130, 12.160, and up to 12.256 MHz have been used,
with any clear spots in between. (The originator of this information
did not indicate mode, but one would think it is USB.)


21 meter band: This band runs from 13.630 - 13.995 MHz, and modes are
AM/USB. It has transcontinental traffic and is only used occasionally..
13.360 - 13.960 MHz is the main hobby pirate broadcasting range.
There is also an international CB band where the calling frequency is
13.995 MHz. (In the U.S.A., 13.995 is NOT recommended for CB type
communication due to military and MARS traffic! Instead, U.S. stations
are encouraged to use 13.555 MHz USB, which is a Part 15 allocation.)
Refer to FCC rules and regulations as to what constitutes Part 15
stations.


Non-government frequencies in the U.S.A.


Few U.S. radio hobbyists are also aware of the following frequency
ranges that are listed as "non-government exclusive" by the FCC.
(The Citizen's Band, and most Ham bands are examples of
non-government exclusive allocations.) These are generally considered
"safe" areas around 12, 11, and 10 meters for Freebanding.
1) 25.010 - 25.070 MHz -- use CB antenna & tuner
2) 25.210 - 25.330 MHz -- use CB antenna & tuner
3) 26.175 - 26.480 MHz
4) 26.950 - 26.960 MHz
5) 27.410 - 27.540 MHz
6) 29.700 - 29.890 MHz
7) 29.910 - 30.000 MHz


-- (Also, a number of freeband stations have been known to use HF
marine frequencies.) --


*In Europe this has been a 'pirate' band for many years, referred to by
the
users as '45 meters'. Users seem to be radio enthusiasts , often ex
27Mhz
SSB operators who use this as an alternative band. This 'band' appears
to
extend from around 6600 Khz to 6700. There is a 'calling frequency ' on
6670Khz where you will often hear stations calling 'CQ45'. Similar nets
also
seem to take place just below 3500Khz.


Additionally, it has been reported that 18.030 MHz LSB has been in use


In the United States operating anywhere other then the CB radio
frequencies, or GMRS - 1 watt / FRS .5 watt will get you in a lot of
trouble.


You must possess a FCC license to operate on HF bands and if the HF band
is not allocated for operation, operation there is illegal....


The only other place you can operate - again with a license is the MARS
Frequencies.


--
Channel Jumper


Um, no, it won't result in "a lot of trouble." It will result,
usually, in the enjoyment of talking with other similar-minded radio
enthusiasts. Don't blow a lot of power and splatter the frequency and
you'll be fine. Here's a link to an international DX group making
great use of some of the freeband, they've been at it for many years
and have many members here in the U.S.


http://www.irdx.net/org/
  #9   Report Post  
Old July 15th 12, 04:43 AM posted to rec.radio.cb
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by RadioBanter: Nov 2008
Posts: 5
Default Echo Charlie frequencies

On Tuesday, June 12, 2012 9:02:14 AM UTC-4, Channel Jumper wrote:
'Scott in Baltimore[_2_ Wrote:
> ;791832']G.Shepherd wrote:-
> does any use any of the Echo Charlie frequencies?-
>
> Not risking my extra ticket...
> http://www.radiobanter.com/showthread.php?t=101215
>
> "Echo Charlie" frequency bands
>
> Not many North American radio hobbyists are aware of the "Echo
> Charlie" bands. They are CB type "freebands" in different parts
> of the HF spectrum. There hasn't been much activity here in North
> America up to 2006 (but that is changing!). There has been, for some
> time, activity in Europe. Check the following frequency ranges:
>
> 85 meter band: 3.450 - 3.495 MHz LSB. This Echo Charlie band's
> calling channel is 3.475 LSB. The band is about 25 kHz either side of
> the call frequency, with occasional traffic from the UK, Germany, and
> Holland appearing. There's heavy QRM at times from utility
> (commercial/military) traffic. Avoid interference with what you may
> hear, and never, ever attempt communication with any "official"
> traffic! TAKE CARE!
>
> *45 meter band: 6.600 - 6.700 MHz LSB. This is an Echo Charlie range
> of frequencies with the calling frequency of 6.670 LSB. It's a good
> band for European traffic. There are often lots of stations from the
> UK, Germany, France, the Netherlands, and Belgium. Some stations are
> running power as low as 2 to 5 watts, with other stations reportedly
> running up to 1,000 watts. Again, there are utility stations in this
> area (like long range air traffic control!). NEVER GO TO USB! This is
> very important!*
>
> 22 meter band: This band has also been experimented with. Channels
> such as 12.105, 12.130, 12.160, and up to 12.256 MHz have been used,
> with any clear spots in between. (The originator of this information
> did not indicate mode, but one would think it is USB.)
>
> 21 meter band: This band runs from 13.630 - 13.995 MHz, and modes are
> AM/USB. It has transcontinental traffic and is only used occasionally.
> 13.360 - 13.960 MHz is the main hobby pirate broadcasting range.
> There is also an international CB band where the calling frequency is
> 13.995 MHz. (In the U.S.A., 13.995 is NOT recommended for CB type
> communication due to military and MARS traffic! Instead, U.S. stations
> are encouraged to use 13.555 MHz USB, which is a Part 15 allocation.)
> Refer to FCC rules and regulations as to what constitutes Part 15
> stations.
>
> Non-government frequencies in the U.S.A.
>
> Few U.S. radio hobbyists are also aware of the following frequency
> ranges that are listed as "non-government exclusive" by the FCC.
> (The Citizen's Band, and most Ham bands are examples of
> non-government exclusive allocations.) These are generally considered
> "safe" areas around 12, 11, and 10 meters for Freebanding.
> 1) 25.010 - 25.070 MHz -- use CB antenna & tuner
> 2) 25.210 - 25.330 MHz -- use CB antenna & tuner
> 3) 26.175 - 26.480 MHz
> 4) 26.950 - 26.960 MHz
> 5) 27.410 - 27.540 MHz
> 6) 29.700 - 29.890 MHz
> 7) 29.910 - 30.000 MHz
>
> -- (Also, a number of freeband stations have been known to use HF
> marine frequencies.) --
>
>
> *In Europe this has been a 'pirate' band for many years, referred to by
> the
> users as '45 meters'. Users seem to be radio enthusiasts , often ex
> 27Mhz
> SSB operators who use this as an alternative band. This 'band' appears
> to
> extend from around 6600 Khz to 6700. There is a 'calling frequency ' on
> 6670Khz where you will often hear stations calling 'CQ45'. Similar nets
> also
> seem to take place just below 3500Khz.
>
> Additionally, it has been reported that 18.030 MHz LSB has been in use

In the United States operating anywhere other then the CB radio
frequencies, or GMRS - 1 watt / FRS .5 watt will get you in a lot of
trouble.

You must possess a FCC license to operate on HF bands and if the HF band
is not allocated for operation, operation there is illegal....

The only other place you can operate - again with a license is the MARS
Frequencies.




--
Channel Jumper



This group has dealt with people like you before who can't get past the legal issue in any discussion. You're like broken records. Pity. You could learn plenty if you weren't so prejudiced and preoccupied. With your dim look of CB, one must wonder why you refer to yourself as "Channel Jumper." Most hams don't refer to their frequencies as channels.
  #10   Report Post  
Old July 19th 12, 01:20 AM
Senior Member
 
First recorded activity by RadioBanter: Jan 2011
Posts: 388
Default

[/i][/color]


This group has dealt with people like you before who can't get past the legal issue in any discussion. You're like broken records. Pity. You could learn plenty if you weren't so prejudiced and preoccupied. With your dim look of CB, one must wonder why you refer to yourself as "Channel Jumper." Most hams don't refer to their frequencies as channels.[/quote]

Blah blah blah blah blahhh...

If a person has a street legal 4 watt AM CB radio - they can talk as they please on the CB radio frequencies - legally as long as they do not break any commission rules.

Operating out of band or out of the band plan is a real good way of getting yourself in trouble....

Suggesting to anyone that they ought to operate out of the band plan - isn't real good amateur radio practice...

Sounds like you are trying to get people into trouble....


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