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Old August 26th 03, 06:34 PM
Alan D. Woodford
 
Posts: n/a
Default Repeaters


I am new to ham radios. I live in Norcross, Georgia. I haven't been able
to

communicate with any one yet. I have a Vertex VX-150. Do I have to

connect to a repeater to converse. If so, what steps do I take to connect to

the repeater. The nearest one to me is Stone Mountain W4BOC 146.760 -

146.160 107.2 . I intend to join a amateur radio group this month.



Thank-you in advance!



Alan D. Woodford

KI4BSP




  #2   Report Post  
Old August 26th 03, 07:26 PM
Signal In The Noise
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Alan -- read the manual and make a cheat sheet

Here is a generic guide

Maybe best to walk before you run. First tackle the easy one, program a
simplex channel.
Then try programming for a repeater not requiring PL for access.

Next, program for a repeater that does require PL to access (Pled repeater).

For a simplex channel, first determine how to access the VFO and put in the
desired frequency.

Next, find the information for offset.

Check that the offset is neither plus or minus, i.e., it is in simplex, then
memory write all.

-------------------------------

For a Pled Repeater, invoke the VFO mode and enter the repeater output
frequency,

set the offset value (e.g., 600 kHz) plus or minus as required.

Next enter the tone frequency, tone activation, then memory write all.

Many beginners enter the tone frequency, but forget to activate the tone.

If you have trouble , there are pocket guides at URL:


http://niftyaccessories.com/index.html


Or get a programming cable and software -- see AES or HRO stores.
----------------------------

Here is how a repeater works
In the illustration above -- (sorry can't post a pic on a NG), the mobile
station wishes to communicate with both the base and the pedestrian with a
Handi-Talkie (HT). But the mobile, base, and HT are too far apart, too low
in altitude and blocked by the mountain. So the mobile transmits on 146.130
MHz to the mountain top repeater. The repeater processes the FM signal and
simultaneously transmits the information on 146.730 MHz. Both the base and
HT are in the receive mode (146.730 MHz) and pick up the communication from
the repeater that was transmitted by the mobile station – slick huh?

When the HT wishes to transmit (when the mobile station is done), the user
presses the mic button and the HT will automatically switch to transmit mode
and transmit at 146.130 MHz, the other two stations, when not transmitting,
automatically go to the receive mode and receive the communication on
146.730 MHz. You'll may hear this repeater referred to as "The 73 Repeater
or the Mount Stratosphere machine".

Repeaters are not parrots (listen then repeat), so repeat is perhaps a
misnomer, as it doesn’t listen, store, and then after a delay re-transmit,
it does this simultaneously. For repeater operation, our transceivers have
to be preset or programmed to transmit on one frequency and receive on a
different frequency. This is referred to as offset, split, input/output. See
conventions for Offsets at the end of this chapter.

For an offset example, consider a repeater that hears you as you transmit on
146.130 MHz (input), and repeats you onto 146.730 MHz (output). The amount
that the receive frequency is offset from the transmit frequency is called
just that -- the "offset" or "offset frequency". Sometimes referred to as
"split". In this case a 600 kHz offset. Since this repeater receives below
the transmit frequency it is termed a minus offset. A repeater that receives
on 147.130 and transmits on 147.730 MHz has an offset of plus 600 kHz.

Repeaters that have outputs in the lower part of the 146 MHz portion are
often plus offsets while those operating in the upper portion of 146 MHz are
usually minus offsets. For the 145 MHz range – splits are minus, and for the
147 MHz range – splits are plus. See your repeater guides. Most of the new
rigs default to the standard offsets. In some areas, repeaters operate on a
reverse split – check you repeater guide. Although 600 kHz is a standard
offset for 2 Meters, other "oddball splits" are sometimes used, but rarely.

An easy way to remember offsets is (+) Plus Offset = Transmit UP. (-)
Minus Offset = Transmit DOWN

Good Luck



"Alan D. Woodford" wrote in message
nk.net...

I am new to ham radios. I live in Norcross, Georgia. I haven't been able
to

communicate with any one yet. I have a Vertex VX-150. Do I have to

connect to a repeater to converse. If so, what steps do I take to connect

to

the repeater. The nearest one to me is Stone Mountain W4BOC 146.760 -

146.160 107.2 . I intend to join a amateur radio group this month.



Thank-you in advance!



Alan D. Woodford

KI4BSP





  #3   Report Post  
Old August 26th 03, 07:26 PM
Signal In The Noise
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Alan -- read the manual and make a cheat sheet

Here is a generic guide

Maybe best to walk before you run. First tackle the easy one, program a
simplex channel.
Then try programming for a repeater not requiring PL for access.

Next, program for a repeater that does require PL to access (Pled repeater).

For a simplex channel, first determine how to access the VFO and put in the
desired frequency.

Next, find the information for offset.

Check that the offset is neither plus or minus, i.e., it is in simplex, then
memory write all.

-------------------------------

For a Pled Repeater, invoke the VFO mode and enter the repeater output
frequency,

set the offset value (e.g., 600 kHz) plus or minus as required.

Next enter the tone frequency, tone activation, then memory write all.

Many beginners enter the tone frequency, but forget to activate the tone.

If you have trouble , there are pocket guides at URL:


http://niftyaccessories.com/index.html


Or get a programming cable and software -- see AES or HRO stores.
----------------------------

Here is how a repeater works
In the illustration above -- (sorry can't post a pic on a NG), the mobile
station wishes to communicate with both the base and the pedestrian with a
Handi-Talkie (HT). But the mobile, base, and HT are too far apart, too low
in altitude and blocked by the mountain. So the mobile transmits on 146.130
MHz to the mountain top repeater. The repeater processes the FM signal and
simultaneously transmits the information on 146.730 MHz. Both the base and
HT are in the receive mode (146.730 MHz) and pick up the communication from
the repeater that was transmitted by the mobile station – slick huh?

When the HT wishes to transmit (when the mobile station is done), the user
presses the mic button and the HT will automatically switch to transmit mode
and transmit at 146.130 MHz, the other two stations, when not transmitting,
automatically go to the receive mode and receive the communication on
146.730 MHz. You'll may hear this repeater referred to as "The 73 Repeater
or the Mount Stratosphere machine".

Repeaters are not parrots (listen then repeat), so repeat is perhaps a
misnomer, as it doesn’t listen, store, and then after a delay re-transmit,
it does this simultaneously. For repeater operation, our transceivers have
to be preset or programmed to transmit on one frequency and receive on a
different frequency. This is referred to as offset, split, input/output. See
conventions for Offsets at the end of this chapter.

For an offset example, consider a repeater that hears you as you transmit on
146.130 MHz (input), and repeats you onto 146.730 MHz (output). The amount
that the receive frequency is offset from the transmit frequency is called
just that -- the "offset" or "offset frequency". Sometimes referred to as
"split". In this case a 600 kHz offset. Since this repeater receives below
the transmit frequency it is termed a minus offset. A repeater that receives
on 147.130 and transmits on 147.730 MHz has an offset of plus 600 kHz.

Repeaters that have outputs in the lower part of the 146 MHz portion are
often plus offsets while those operating in the upper portion of 146 MHz are
usually minus offsets. For the 145 MHz range – splits are minus, and for the
147 MHz range – splits are plus. See your repeater guides. Most of the new
rigs default to the standard offsets. In some areas, repeaters operate on a
reverse split – check you repeater guide. Although 600 kHz is a standard
offset for 2 Meters, other "oddball splits" are sometimes used, but rarely.

An easy way to remember offsets is (+) Plus Offset = Transmit UP. (-)
Minus Offset = Transmit DOWN

Good Luck



"Alan D. Woodford" wrote in message
nk.net...

I am new to ham radios. I live in Norcross, Georgia. I haven't been able
to

communicate with any one yet. I have a Vertex VX-150. Do I have to

connect to a repeater to converse. If so, what steps do I take to connect

to

the repeater. The nearest one to me is Stone Mountain W4BOC 146.760 -

146.160 107.2 . I intend to join a amateur radio group this month.



Thank-you in advance!



Alan D. Woodford

KI4BSP





  #4   Report Post  
Old August 26th 03, 07:40 PM
Signal In The Noise
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Alan for how repeaters work -- see URL:
http://www.blurty.com/~kb6nu/day/2003/04/03

"Alan D. Woodford" wrote in message
nk.net...

I am new to ham radios. I live in Norcross, Georgia. I haven't been able
to

communicate with any one yet. I have a Vertex VX-150. Do I have to

connect to a repeater to converse. If so, what steps do I take to connect

to

the repeater. The nearest one to me is Stone Mountain W4BOC 146.760 -

146.160 107.2 . I intend to join a amateur radio group this month.



Thank-you in advance!



Alan D. Woodford

KI4BSP





  #5   Report Post  
Old August 26th 03, 07:40 PM
Signal In The Noise
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Alan for how repeaters work -- see URL:
http://www.blurty.com/~kb6nu/day/2003/04/03

"Alan D. Woodford" wrote in message
nk.net...

I am new to ham radios. I live in Norcross, Georgia. I haven't been able
to

communicate with any one yet. I have a Vertex VX-150. Do I have to

connect to a repeater to converse. If so, what steps do I take to connect

to

the repeater. The nearest one to me is Stone Mountain W4BOC 146.760 -

146.160 107.2 . I intend to join a amateur radio group this month.



Thank-you in advance!



Alan D. Woodford

KI4BSP







  #6   Report Post  
Old September 20th 03, 08:49 PM
Steve Silverwood
 
Posts: n/a
Default

[This followup was posted to rec.radio.amateur.misc and a copy was sent
to the cited author.]

In article et,
says...

I am new to ham radios. I live in Norcross, Georgia. I haven't been able
to
communicate with any one yet. I have a Vertex VX-150. Do I have to
connect to a repeater to converse. If so, what steps do I take to connect to
the repeater. The nearest one to me is Stone Mountain W4BOC 146.760 -
146.160 107.2 . I intend to join a amateur radio group this month.


I would recommend tuning your rig to 146.52 FM simplex (no repeater) and
listen for a little while. If you don't hear anyone, put out a CQ call
and see what you get. That'll put you in touch with some local hams on
the air who can shepherd you through your first few QSOs. The advantage
to this is that you will be communicating on a line-of-sight basis, so
anyone you talk to either resides locally or is driving through your
area. It's a great way to meet fellow amateurs in your local community.

Repeater operation is only slightly more complex, as each repeater (and
its owner(s)) have their own way of doing things. The object lesson is
to listen on a particular repeater frequency, see how people conduct
themselves, and when you feel comfortable jump on in. Instead of
calling CQ on a repeater channel, you would say, "KI4BSP, monitoring."
That just tells folks you're there, and interested in a conversation.
If you don't hear any replies, wait a few minutes and try it again.

The information you provided about the Stone Mountain W4BOC repeater
translates thus:

146.760 MHz is the output frequency of the repeater.
146.160 MHz is the input frequency.
107.2 is the CTCSS or "PL" tone used to access the repeater.

Translated, this means:

1) Turn your radio to the 146.76 frequency.
2) Set it to use a "minus" offset. Unless otherwise specified,
all 2m repeaters use a 600 kHz offset, up or down depending
on the output frequency. The term offset indicates how far
down or up the input frequency is.
3) Set it to use a CTCSS tone of 107.2. This is a sub-audible
tone that inserted on your transmit signal. The repeater
will listen for that tone and only allow signals coming
in to "open" the repeater up that carry that signal. The
repeater will then retransmit that signal in real-time
on the output frequency.

Forgive me if I elaborated on things you might already know, but judging
from the original posting it sounded like you were pretty new to the
idea of operating through a repeater. Hope it was helpful.

--

-- //Steve//

Steve Silverwood, KB6OJS
Fountain Valley, CA
Email:

Web:
http://home.earthlink.net/~kb6ojs_steve
  #7   Report Post  
Old September 20th 03, 08:49 PM
Steve Silverwood
 
Posts: n/a
Default

[This followup was posted to rec.radio.amateur.misc and a copy was sent
to the cited author.]

In article et,
says...

I am new to ham radios. I live in Norcross, Georgia. I haven't been able
to
communicate with any one yet. I have a Vertex VX-150. Do I have to
connect to a repeater to converse. If so, what steps do I take to connect to
the repeater. The nearest one to me is Stone Mountain W4BOC 146.760 -
146.160 107.2 . I intend to join a amateur radio group this month.


I would recommend tuning your rig to 146.52 FM simplex (no repeater) and
listen for a little while. If you don't hear anyone, put out a CQ call
and see what you get. That'll put you in touch with some local hams on
the air who can shepherd you through your first few QSOs. The advantage
to this is that you will be communicating on a line-of-sight basis, so
anyone you talk to either resides locally or is driving through your
area. It's a great way to meet fellow amateurs in your local community.

Repeater operation is only slightly more complex, as each repeater (and
its owner(s)) have their own way of doing things. The object lesson is
to listen on a particular repeater frequency, see how people conduct
themselves, and when you feel comfortable jump on in. Instead of
calling CQ on a repeater channel, you would say, "KI4BSP, monitoring."
That just tells folks you're there, and interested in a conversation.
If you don't hear any replies, wait a few minutes and try it again.

The information you provided about the Stone Mountain W4BOC repeater
translates thus:

146.760 MHz is the output frequency of the repeater.
146.160 MHz is the input frequency.
107.2 is the CTCSS or "PL" tone used to access the repeater.

Translated, this means:

1) Turn your radio to the 146.76 frequency.
2) Set it to use a "minus" offset. Unless otherwise specified,
all 2m repeaters use a 600 kHz offset, up or down depending
on the output frequency. The term offset indicates how far
down or up the input frequency is.
3) Set it to use a CTCSS tone of 107.2. This is a sub-audible
tone that inserted on your transmit signal. The repeater
will listen for that tone and only allow signals coming
in to "open" the repeater up that carry that signal. The
repeater will then retransmit that signal in real-time
on the output frequency.

Forgive me if I elaborated on things you might already know, but judging
from the original posting it sounded like you were pretty new to the
idea of operating through a repeater. Hope it was helpful.

--

-- //Steve//

Steve Silverwood, KB6OJS
Fountain Valley, CA
Email:

Web:
http://home.earthlink.net/~kb6ojs_steve


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