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[email protected] February 28th 07 06:26 PM

RFI from Switched power supply
 
Hi all,

I have the (incredible fast and reliable) Verizon fiber optic into the
house for my internet connection. So far so good. However at the
access point there is a battery backup unit for the fiber-Copper
converter. This battery unit is kept charged by a powersupply that
makes an ENOURMOUS amount of RFI that radiates onto the (15 feet) lead
into the unit and from there into the shack. (S6)

Does anybody have any suggestions on how to silence this? Or... a
suggestion for a cheap and 'quiet' powersupply? (It's output is a
regular 12v)

73 Rob

KE7KZN


Richard Crowley[_2_] February 28th 07 07:30 PM

RFI from Switched power supply
 
wrote ...
I have the (incredible fast and reliable) Verizon fiber optic into the
house for my internet connection. So far so good. However at the
access point there is a battery backup unit for the fiber-Copper
converter. This battery unit is kept charged by a powersupply that
makes an ENOURMOUS amount of RFI that radiates onto the (15 feet) lead
into the unit and from there into the shack. (S6)

Does anybody have any suggestions on how to silence this? Or... a
suggestion for a cheap and 'quiet' powersupply? (It's output is a
regular 12v)


You could likely find a linear (old-fashioned 60Hz transformer)
"wall-wart" power supply at Radio Shack (and the appropriate
connector/adapter to fit your equipment).

I have FIOS in my neighborhood, but haven't signed up yet.
I'm going to give up waiting for the WiMax broadband wireless
network service and just go with FIOS.

Richard KE7GKP (down the street at Intel)



Rich Greenberg February 28th 07 07:32 PM

RFI from Switched power supply
 
In article . com,
wrote:
Hi all,

I have the (incredible fast and reliable) Verizon fiber optic into the
house for my internet connection. So far so good. However at the
access point there is a battery backup unit for the fiber-Copper
converter. This battery unit is kept charged by a powersupply that
makes an ENOURMOUS amount of RFI that radiates onto the (15 feet) lead
into the unit and from there into the shack. (S6)

Does anybody have any suggestions on how to silence this? Or... a
suggestion for a cheap and 'quiet' powersupply? (It's output is a
regular 12v)


You could try ferrite beads on the wires. YMMV.

Or just bitch to Verizon.

--
Rich Greenberg N Ft Myers, FL, USA richgr atsign panix.com + 1 239 543 1353
Eastern time. N6LRT I speak for myself & my dogs only. VM'er since CP-67
Canines:Val, Red, Shasta & Casey (RIP), Red & Zero, Siberians Owner:Chinook-L
Retired at the beach Asst Owner:Sibernet-L


Mike Andrews February 28th 07 07:44 PM

RFI from Switched power supply
 
On 28 Feb 2007 14:30:08 -0500, Richard Crowley wrote in :
wrote ...
I have the (incredible fast and reliable) Verizon fiber optic into the
house for my internet connection. So far so good. However at the
access point there is a battery backup unit for the fiber-Copper
converter. This battery unit is kept charged by a powersupply that
makes an ENOURMOUS amount of RFI that radiates onto the (15 feet) lead
into the unit and from there into the shack. (S6)

Does anybody have any suggestions on how to silence this? Or... a
suggestion for a cheap and 'quiet' powersupply? (It's output is a
regular 12v)


You could likely find a linear (old-fashioned 60Hz transformer)
"wall-wart" power supply at Radio Shack (and the appropriate
connector/adapter to fit your equipment).


I have FIOS in my neighborhood, but haven't signed up yet.
I'm going to give up waiting for the WiMax broadband wireless
network service and just go with FIOS.


Seems to me that their power supply is interfering with a licensed
service, and that it's Verizon's problem to solve. In addition, if
you do anything to their hardware, however well-intentioned and
skillful you are, you're giving them an excuse to blame any of your
future problems on you.

At least they *have* a battery backup for their FIOS.

--
Mike Andrews, W5EGO

Tired old sysadmin


John Smith I February 28th 07 09:50 PM

RFI from Switched power supply
 
wrote:
Hi all,

I have the (incredible fast and reliable) Verizon fiber optic into the
house for my internet connection. So far so good. However at the
access point there is a battery backup unit for the fiber-Copper
converter. This battery unit is kept charged by a powersupply that
makes an ENOURMOUS amount of RFI that radiates onto the (15 feet) lead
into the unit and from there into the shack. (S6)

Does anybody have any suggestions on how to silence this? Or... a
suggestion for a cheap and 'quiet' powersupply? (It's output is a
regular 12v)

73 Rob

KE7KZN


Run it off a pack of eight rechargable nimh or nicads, make a simple
charger unit and fast charge when not in use.

Should be a quiet as a lamb ...

JS
--
http://assemblywizard.tekcities.com


Pat Cook March 1st 07 03:58 AM

RFI from Switched power supply
 
Hi everyone:

"Mike Andrews" wrote in message
...
On 28 Feb 2007 14:30:08 -0500, Richard Crowley wrote
in :
wrote ...
I have the (incredible fast and reliable) Verizon fiber optic into the
house for my internet connection. So far so good. However at the
access point there is a battery backup unit for the fiber-Copper
converter. This battery unit is kept charged by a powersupply that
makes an ENOURMOUS amount of RFI that radiates onto the (15 feet) lead
into the unit and from there into the shack. (S6)

Does anybody have any suggestions on how to silence this? Or... a
suggestion for a cheap and 'quiet' powersupply? (It's output is a
regular 12v)


Seems to me that their power supply is interfering with a licensed
service, and that it's Verizon's problem to solve. In addition, if
you do anything to their hardware, however well-intentioned and
skillful you are, you're giving them an excuse to blame any of your
future problems on you.


I'm afraid I have to respectfully disagree Mike.

While it's EASY to blame Verizon and accuse them of interfering with a
licensed service, you're forgetting one thing. Their technicians, just like
that of any major broadband provider (Be it Verizon, Time-Warner, Comcast,
QWORST, etc),.ARE NOT trained to handle Ham Radio Operators as customers nor
are they trained to customize the installation so it doesn't interfere with
Amateur Radio. They are only required to troubleshoot (Or at least attempt
to) problems with the equipment and/or anything it's connected to. If no
problems exist within the equipment or anything it's connected to, then the
problem(s) lie with the Ham station itself.

That can only be corrected by the Ham.

Richard....Did you do a full diagnostic on your station to see if the
problem might somehow be in your Ham equipment that might be receiving
excessive amounts of RF, thus causing the problem?

At least they *have* a battery backup for their FIOS.


This may be true Mike, but as I said IF the problem is not with the
provider's equipment and/or anything it's connected to, then Richard is the
one with the problem and only he can solve it. Verizon can't do a thing
about problems with his Ham station because, again assuming there are no
problems with Verizon's equipment or anything it's connected to, they're not
responsible.

Just my $.02 worth :D

Cheers & 73 :D

Pat Cook, KB0OXD
Denver, Colorado
WEBSITE - http://www.qsl.net/kb0oxd/
**NEW VIDEO SECTION - http://www.qsl.net/kb0oxd/cybershacktv/



Mike Andrews March 1st 07 06:19 AM

RFI from Switched power supply
 
On 28 Feb 2007 22:58:35 -0500, Pat Cook wrote in :
Hi everyone:


"Mike Andrews" wrote in message
...
On 28 Feb 2007 14:30:08 -0500, Richard Crowley wrote
in :
wrote ...
I have the (incredible fast and reliable) Verizon fiber optic into the
house for my internet connection. So far so good. However at the
access point there is a battery backup unit for the fiber-Copper
converter. This battery unit is kept charged by a powersupply that
makes an ENOURMOUS amount of RFI that radiates onto the (15 feet) lead
into the unit and from there into the shack. (S6)

Does anybody have any suggestions on how to silence this? Or... a
suggestion for a cheap and 'quiet' powersupply? (It's output is a
regular 12v)


Seems to me that their power supply is interfering with a licensed
service, and that it's Verizon's problem to solve. In addition, if
you do anything to their hardware, however well-intentioned and
skillful you are, you're giving them an excuse to blame any of your
future problems on you.


I'm afraid I have to respectfully disagree Mike.


While it's EASY to blame Verizon and accuse them of interfering with a
licensed service, you're forgetting one thing. Their technicians, just like
that of any major broadband provider (Be it Verizon, Time-Warner, Comcast,
QWORST, etc),.ARE NOT trained to handle Ham Radio Operators as customers nor
are they trained to customize the installation so it doesn't interfere with
Amateur Radio. They are only required to troubleshoot (Or at least attempt
to) problems with the equipment and/or anything it's connected to. If no
problems exist within the equipment or anything it's connected to, then the
problem(s) lie with the Ham station itself.


That can only be corrected by the Ham.


Richard....Did you do a full diagnostic on your station to see if the
problem might somehow be in your Ham equipment that might be receiving
excessive amounts of RF, thus causing the problem?


At least they *have* a battery backup for their FIOS.


This may be true Mike, but as I said IF the problem is not with the
provider's equipment and/or anything it's connected to, then Richard is the
one with the problem and only he can solve it. Verizon can't do a thing
about problems with his Ham station because, again assuming there are no
problems with Verizon's equipment or anything it's connected to, they're not
responsible.


Just my $.02 worth :D


"Assuming there's no problem with Verizon's equipment ... ."

Richard wrote explicitly that there *was* something wrong with it --
that "his battery unit is kept charged by a powersupply that makes an
ENOURMOUS amount of RFI that radiates onto the (15 feet) lead into the
unit and from there into the shack. (S6)"

Looks like it's not justifiable to assume that there's no problem with
Verizon's equipment.

Ah, but ... The FCC sends out enforcement letters to folks with noise
generators -- unintentional radiators -- with some frequency. The
ones I've seen have included fence chargers with problems, aquarium
heaters, televisions that were leaking signal, power line transformers
and insulators, and a great many more classes of sources.

If it's Verizon's equipment, then it's Verizon's problem, and a
letter to them -- outlining the problem and suggesting that they do
something to fix it before a letter gets sent to the FCC -- probably
should be sent. And, of course, it is not Richard's equipment, but
Verizon's equipment. While their run-of-the-mill techs may not be
qualified to deal with this, VZ will have some higher-level techs who
*are* so qualified.

VZ is *required* to not interfere, just as the folks with the aquarium
heater, the folks with the bad fence chargers, the folks with the leaky
TVs, and the folks operating the power transmission system are required
to not interfere. The enforcement letters tell them what will happen if
they continue to interfere, and it's generally pretty pricey.

If the power supply is radiating enough to interfere, then it's also
radiating enough that VZ is required to fix the problem. Whether they
have techs trained to do so isn't germane to the issue; the FCC has in
the past just told the folks responsible for the interference to stop
it. Or else. Period.

--
Mike Andrews, W5EGO

Tired old sysadmin


[email protected] March 1st 07 08:18 AM

RFI from Switched power supply
 
Thanks guys!

I'm going to play with some filters and beads. See if that works
first. I agree that it actually is Verizon's problem (and I will
inform them when I can't get it resolved.) but I want to see if I can
avoid the headace of trying to explain them the issue. $5 worth of
filter/beads might not be so badly spend if it works. Oh by the way...
found out that the powersupply is 48V! (my bad!)


Phil Kane March 1st 07 09:16 PM

RFI from Switched power supply
 
On 1 Mar 2007 01:19:20 -0500, "Mike Andrews"
wrote:

VZ is *required* to not interfere, just as the folks with the aquarium
heater, the folks with the bad fence chargers, the folks with the leaky
TVs, and the folks operating the power transmission system are required
to not interfere. The enforcement letters tell them what will happen if
they continue to interfere, and it's generally pretty pricey.

And on a practical point, Verizon would rather spend the $100 in
labor and $10 in equipment costs to solve the problem to avoid having
their name "flagged" in regulatory enforcement files and have it pop
up when they apply for something really important such as rule
exemptions or rate increases!

If it were me, I would run a good heavy fused lead to my 12V station
battery and leave the charger unplugged and disconnected. That's
something the average installation tech can understand.
--

73 de K2ASP - Phil Kane

From a Clearing in the Silicon Forest

Beaverton (Washington County) Oregon

e-mail: k2asp [at] arrl [dot] net


Phil Kane March 1st 07 09:17 PM

RFI from Switched power supply
 
On 1 Mar 2007 03:18:49 -0500, wrote:

Oh by the way...
found out that the powersupply is 48V! (my bad!)


Well, it won't work from a 12V battery then... g

The only 48V supplies that I am used to are ones that take up, a whole
wall in a communications vault...not quite the same!
--

73 de K2ASP - Phil Kane

From a Clearing in the Silicon Forest

Beaverton (Washington County) Oregon

e-mail: k2asp [at] arrl [dot] net



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