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Old August 1st 10, 06:14 AM posted to rec.radio.amateur.boatanchors
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Default fs - 1950s police radio anyone? Motorola

just picked up a Motorola FMTRU 80 D, no tubes, no crystals, no dynamotor,
otherwise seems to be complete. If you are interested, contact me at the
email address on my web page and I can send you a picture. This unit is
dated 1953

This site http://www.wb6nvh.com/Moto42/Moto42.htm has interesting info on
it:

80D and 140D: These were the industry standards in the 1950's and made in
the greatest quantity.. The FMTR- or FMTRU-80(D) and FMTR- or FMTRU-140D are
15" wide cased mobiles which usually used Sensicon receivers with high power
transmitters. In some instances, a less expensive "Unichannel" receiver was
used. The 80D used a pair of 2E26's while the 140D used a single 829B in the
transmitter power amplifier. The 80D was nominally a 30 Watt transmitter
while the 140D was nominally a 60 Watt transmitter. The power supply used a
vibrator for the receiver and a dynamotor for the transmitter. The Research
Line enjoyed widespread popularity and such a long service life that most of
them were converted to 12 volts after the auto industry switched battery
voltage standards in 1956, and many were also converted to comply with
"narrow band" FM requirements mandated by the FCC in the early 1960's. In
the mid-1960's, Motorola even offered a field modification kit which
replaced the vibrator/dynamotor power supply in the 80 and 140 series with a
12 Volt transistorized power supply, which included a heat sink which bolted
to the front panel and instructions to overstrike the model number on the ID
plate to read FMTR-140(T) or FMTR-80(T) as appropriate. The chassis used in
these mobiles were also used in all manner of upright cabinet base stations,
desktop base stations, repeaters and so forth


--
Bill -
www.wbnoble.com


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Old August 1st 10, 07:57 PM posted to rec.radio.amateur.boatanchors
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First recorded activity by RadioBanter: Aug 2006
Posts: 88
Default fs - 1950s police radio anyone? Motorola

On Jul 31, 10:14*pm, "Bill Noble" wrote:
just picked up a Motorola FMTRU 80 D, no tubes, no crystals, no dynamotor,
otherwise seems to be complete. *If you are interested, contact me at the
email address on my web page and I can send you a picture. *This unit is
dated 1953

This sitehttp://www.wb6nvh.com/Moto42/Moto42.htm*has interesting info on
it:

80D and 140D: These were the industry standards in the 1950's and made in
the greatest quantity.. The FMTR- or FMTRU-80(D) and FMTR- or FMTRU-140D are
15" wide cased mobiles which usually used Sensicon receivers with high power
transmitters. In some instances, a less expensive "Unichannel" receiver was
used. The 80D used a pair of 2E26's while the 140D used a single 829B in the
transmitter power amplifier. The 80D was nominally a 30 Watt transmitter
while the 140D was nominally a 60 Watt transmitter. The power supply used a
vibrator for the receiver and a dynamotor for the transmitter. The Research
Line enjoyed widespread popularity and such a long service life that most of
them were converted to 12 volts after the auto industry switched battery
voltage standards in 1956, and many were also converted to comply with
"narrow band" FM requirements mandated by the FCC in the early 1960's. In
the mid-1960's, Motorola even offered a field modification kit which
replaced the vibrator/dynamotor power supply in the 80 and 140 series with a
12 Volt transistorized power supply, which included a heat sink which bolted
to the front panel and instructions to overstrike the model number on the ID
plate to read FMTR-140(T) or FMTR-80(T) as appropriate. The chassis used in
these mobiles were also used in all manner of upright cabinet base stations,
desktop base stations, repeaters and so forth

--
Bill *-www.wbnoble.com


Wow. the 80D was the first 2 meter fm rig I ever owned. Got it from
Western Electric via local radio club. Installed in our 1963 Plymouth
Valiant. Seemed like it took up most of the trunk space. I think it
was dual channel, but that was not a problem as there was only one FM
repeater in Portland at that time. One channel repeater and one
simplex. Ah, those were the days!

Paul, KD7HB


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