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Old March 16th 05, 04:12 AM
Mike Terry
 
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Default "Within 15 years AM/FM radio will become a curiosity"

March 15, 2005
Mike Rogers

Over the next ten to twenty years there will be a revolution in broadcasting
so drastic that I believe TV sets will virtually disappear in American homes
within the next 25 years. The in-home AM/FM radio is already going the way
of the 1950's short-wave, and within 15 years will become a curiosity.

After being slapped with several serious fines amounting to over $2.5
million dollars over the last ten years for profanity from the Nanny state
under the guise of the FCC, Howard Stern is boasting that he will take his
act to the future of radio broadcasting: Satellite radio and move to Sirius
Satellite Radio beginning in January of 2006. Sirius is going to pay Howard
Stern $500 million dollars over the span of five years. Great deal for
Howard Stern? Most definitely. Good deal for Sirius Satellite Radio? Well,
desperate people will do desperate things. But most of you folks already
know this story. It's what Howard doesn't know (and that includes most
people) that's going to hurt. The future of broadcasting is definitely not
in satellites.

(snip)

For the FM radio stations, things look even worse. Many new cars are coming
out in Japan that do not even have FM radio tuners in them. And why should
they? The cars are all equipped with GPS and are soon to be Internet
compatible. Most can already plug into radio via cell-phone. And the
cell-phone providers are not lining themselves up with FM radio providers.
They are setting up themselves with Broad-band and Internet stations. The AM
stations' saving grace will be the traffic reports - but even that is "iffy"
as GPS can do the same thing.

Recent surveys have shown that more and more people are gathering their news
from the Internet. Younger people have no problem with this at all. The
older generation who has the out-dated (and wasteful) habit of feeling like
they need to read a newspaper or watch TV news will not change course. You
cannot teach an old dog new tricks. But, this older generation,
unfortunately, will be gone soon enough. And when they are, and the
subscription numbers of newspapers hit rock bottom; the TV news viewer-ship
continues to erode (and it has been eroding for the last 20 years across the
board); and the conglomerates are no longer capable of justifying to
sponsors spending millions on ads that no one sees, the entire mass media
set-up we have been used to for the last 50 years will come crashing down.
This is the assumption that TIVO has been working on, somewhat successfully,
over these last five years. The problem for TIVO now is: With HDD DVD coming
on the market, who needs to pay a monthly subscription to TIVO? I suspect
that if you own TIVO stock, you had better sell now. Heck, think about it,
any stock in any Big Media is a sure loser.

We now have Internet radio. I work in the music business. It is common
knowledge among everyone in my field, that young people who want to hear new
music, listen to Internet radio. No one listens to FM anymore. FM radio is
beyond repair to the younger crowd as it has a very unfashionable and
worthless image. The Internet radio stations are exciting and they are
booming. It's just a matter of time, before Internet radio destroys FM radio
for music lovers, be they Classical, Jazz, or even Country music, Rock, or
Hip Hop fans. And it won't matter if we are talking about in the home or in
the car.

In Japan, just about all the cellular phone companies are launching their
own Internet accessible radio networks. Who needs to buy a $500 to $1200
dollar AM/FM CD player for the car when you can just plug your cell phone
into your in-car CD/DVD player and be able to access literally thousands
crystal clear Internet stations as well as down-loadable music from the
Internet?

And, from what I understand, Internet TV is just around the corner. In fact,
several business associates of mine are contemplating starting the worlds
first 24-hour-a-day Internet TV News Network. How do they make money from
it? Now that's the $64 million dollar question. But I can see making more
money from that in twenty years than I can from how the traditional TV
stations do it. The traditional stations are dinosaurs and most of them
don't even know it yet.

Very soon, people won't need an AM/FM radio receiver. They won't need a TV
screen. Newspapers are already on their last legs. Everyone already has a
computer - No, everyone needs a computer. The computer will be able to do
them all in one place. And back to satellite radio? Are you kidding, Howard
Stern? You don't think that people are going to go out and actually spend a
few hundred dollars to buy a satellite dish and tuner, plus pay monthly
subscription fees, when they can most likely get your show pirated over the
Internet for free do you?

The Internet is the key. Internet news is destroying the newspapers, and
helping Big Media TV news destroy itself. Internet radio is here. Internet
TV is just around the corner. HDD DVD is coming this year. And the beautiful
part? No sponsors, no fees, no commercials. Some smart person is going to
come up with, in short order, a revolutionary way to advertise too, and then
it will be game over for Big Media.

So, Howard Stern, congrats on the $500 million from Sirius Satellite
Radio.... Try to get the money up-front. And if you can, run like hell and
don't look back.

(Full article at http://www.lewrockwell.com/rogers/rogers134.html )




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Old March 17th 05, 06:01 AM
Robert J Carpenter
 
Posts: n/a
Default


March 15, 2005
Mike Rogers

Over the next ten to twenty years there will be a revolution in

broadcasting
so drastic that I believe TV sets will virtually disappear in

American homes
within the next 25 years. The in-home AM/FM radio is already going

the way
of the 1950's short-wave, and within 15 years will become a

curiosity.

The US general public "never" listened to short wave in the 1950s.
99.99% of the radios sold didn't have it.

HUGE SNIP

And back to satellite radio? Are you kidding, Howard
Stern? You don't think that people are going to go out and actually

spend a
few hundred dollars to buy a satellite dish and tuner, plus pay

monthly
subscription fees, when they can most likely get your show pirated

over the
Internet for free do you?


What kind of "expert" is this who thinks you need a dish to receive
satellite radio? Has he been in a store to price sat radio equipment?

But some of his dire predictions seem reasonable to me.


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Old March 20th 05, 09:00 PM
Don Forsling
 
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"Mike Terry" wrote in message
...
March 15, 2005
Mike Rogers

The in-home AM/FM radio is already going the way
of the 1950's short-wave,


And what way was that? There was virtually no short-wave radio penetration
in the 1950's..maybe .5% of homes has short-wave reception capability at
most. There's never been a significant short-wave penetration among
non-hobbyist listeners in the U.S.-- never, ever.

That said, yes, there is a possibility that AM./FM as we know it now will go
away. It is, in fact, more than a possibility. It's a certainly with time.
But who cares? When it does go away, it'll be replaced by something else
that serves roughly similar needs and desires and will probably be niftier
and more appealing--else why would AM/FM go away? I could not care less if
a particular technology goes away. It happens all the time.

Now, I'll go away.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Don Forsling

"Iowa--Gateway to Those Big Rectangular States"



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Old March 22nd 05, 06:50 PM
Rich Wood
 
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Default

On Tue, 22 Mar 2005 08:16:35 -0600, "Richard Fry"
wrote:

3) The FCC forbids short-wave broadcasting to the US market from stations
located in the US.


As we all know, the FCC rigidly enforces that prohibition. We also
know that a Pacific transmitter location is a perfect place to serve
the Canadian Maritimes.

Rich

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Old March 30th 05, 04:26 AM
Larry W4CSC
 
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"Mike Terry" wrote in
:

people won't need an AM/FM radio receiver


Why I don't listen to radio any more.......

"News Talk 1250, WTMA"
"Your home for news and talk, 730 WSC"
"News Talk 1250, WTMA"
"Your home for news and talk, 730 WSC"
"News Talk 1250, WTMA"
"Your home for news and talk, 730 WSC"
"News Talk 1250, WTMA"
"Your home for news and talk, 730 WSC"
"News Talk 1250, WTMA"
"Your home for news and talk, 730 WSC"
"News Talk 1250, WTMA"
"Your home for news and talk, 730 WSC"
The minute record is held by WSCC (WSC is RCA Communications' marine
callsign) at 12, in 60 seconds. The hourly rate record is held by WTMA at
237/hour during a local talkshow where they ran out of subjects.

I've called into both and BEGGED them to go easy on the self-promotional
repetition, to no avail. "We all know what the station's callsign is and
what frequency it is on.", I tried to convince them. Deaf ears....all
deaf. Someone told me they do that so we don't forget in case the ratings
people call us.

Pick any station with either computer or talking heads....same thing.
"News Radio 750, WSB"...over and over and over.

When the rating company called to ask me what station I listened to, I told
her I liked BBC-2 better than BBC-4, but listened to both. She was
speechless until I explained where REAL radio broadcasting was still being
produced. Thank you, people of the UK! I offered to pay my radio tax to
BBC to help pay my share of the internet server costs. They told me thank
you for offering but it wasn't necessary. I replied to that with an offer
to pay for BBC-TV on broadband of the local programming so I could watch
great British comedies less than 5 years old like PBS intermittently
broadcasts. They're actually thinking about it!

Broadcasters in the USA have killed radio and TV. Remember when NAB used
to limit the spam to 10 minutes an hour with actual PROGRAMMING for 50
minutes? We'll never see that, again.....

Dammit.....

..



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Old March 31st 05, 12:57 AM
David Eduardo
 
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"Larry W4CSC" wrote in message
...

The minute record is held by WSCC (WSC is RCA Communications' marine

callsign) at 12, in 60 seconds. The hourly rate record is held by WTMA at
237/hour during a local talkshow where they ran out of subjects.


The station with the longest #1 run in the US, KGO in San Francisco,
averages 50 to 70 KGO's an hour. It is part of thier success.

I've called into both and BEGGED them to go easy on the self-promotional
repetition, to no avail. "We all know what the station's callsign is and
what frequency it is on.", I tried to convince them.


You may know it. You are interested enough to visit an off the beaten path
news group about radio. Most people dont remember what they listened to...
especially since this country has a tradition of giving call letters to
staitons instead of names.

Deaf ears....all
deaf. Someone told me they do that so we don't forget in case the ratings
people call us.


Ratings people do not take the ratins data on the phone.

When the rating company called to ask me what station I listened to, I
told
her I liked BBC-2 better than BBC-4, but listened to both.


That was some poll, probably done by an advertiser on thier own. Radio
ratings are not done on the phone. And radio ratings never, ever, ask about
a "favorite" station.

Broadcasters in the USA have killed radio and TV. Remember when NAB used
to limit the spam to 10 minutes an hour with actual PROGRAMMING for 50
minutes? We'll never see that, again.....


You will never see that again because you never saw it before. The NAB did
not limit ad time per hour. The FCC would review your license renewal
application back when licenses were renewed every three years if you went
over 18 minutes an hour, and the voluntary NAB code also recommended 18.

Only in the early days of FM growth (late 60's to mid 70's) did FMs on their
own try to do 10 minutes, more or less. On the other hand, in the fondly
remembered glory days of Top 40 AM, stations frequently ran 18 minutes, with
6 or 7 breaks an hour being common.

Hey, buy a carton of Cokes. I'll betcha the carton has "Coke" and "Coca
Cola" multiple times on every can and all over the carton. Guess why.


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Old April 2nd 05, 07:46 AM
Leonard Martin
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article ,
"David Eduardo" wrote:

"Larry W4CSC" wrote in message
...

The minute record is held by WSCC (WSC is RCA Communications' marine

callsign) at 12, in 60 seconds. The hourly rate record is held by WTMA at
237/hour during a local talkshow where they ran out of subjects.


The station with the longest #1 run in the US, KGO in San Francisco,
averages 50 to 70 KGO's an hour. It is part of thier success.

I've called into both and BEGGED them to go easy on the self-promotional
repetition, to no avail. "We all know what the station's callsign is and
what frequency it is on.", I tried to convince them.


You may know it. You are interested enough to visit an off the beaten path
news group about radio. Most people dont remember what they listened to...
especially since this country has a tradition of giving call letters to
staitons instead of names.

Deaf ears....all
deaf. Someone told me they do that so we don't forget in case the ratings
people call us.


Ratings people do not take the ratins data on the phone.

When the rating company called to ask me what station I listened to, I
told
her I liked BBC-2 better than BBC-4, but listened to both.


That was some poll, probably done by an advertiser on thier own. Radio
ratings are not done on the phone. And radio ratings never, ever, ask about
a "favorite" station.

Broadcasters in the USA have killed radio and TV. Remember when NAB used
to limit the spam to 10 minutes an hour with actual PROGRAMMING for 50
minutes? We'll never see that, again.....




Our radio vs the BBC is such a clear case of capitalism NOT being the
best basis on which to arrange some aspects of society that I just
suddenly conceived the fond hope that some of you out there might be
moved by this example to question the American truism that "business
does it best".

Once you have actually entertained this heterodox idea, you might try
looking around to see other areas in which letting business control
everything has turned out to be a bad idea.

By such moments of individual enlightenment is progress slowly made.

Leonard

--
"Everything that rises must converge"
--Flannery O'Connor

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Old April 2nd 05, 07:46 AM
Steve Sobol
 
Posts: n/a
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David Eduardo wrote:

You will never see that again because you never saw it before. The NAB did
not limit ad time per hour. The FCC would review your license renewal
application back when licenses were renewed every three years if you went
over 18 minutes an hour, and the voluntary NAB code also recommended 18.


So what's all the fuss at Clear Channel about suddenly providing 40-50 minutes
per hour of commercial-free content, then?

It's not a new concept.

--
JustThe.net - Apple Valley, CA - http://JustThe.net/ - 888.480.4NET (4638)
Steven J. Sobol, Geek In Charge / / PGP: 0xE3AE35ED

"The wisdom of a fool won't set you free"
--New Order, "Bizarre Love Triangle"

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Old April 2nd 05, 07:06 PM
Roland Stiner
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Broadcasters in the USA have killed radio and TV. Remember when NAB used
to limit the spam to 10 minutes an hour with actual PROGRAMMING for 50
minutes? We'll never see that, again.....

Dammit.....


Have you tried NPR? Great radio!

Roland, NK2U




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Old April 4th 05, 10:29 PM
Don Forsling
 
Posts: n/a
Default



"Steve Sobol" wrote in message
...
David Eduardo wrote:

You will never see that again because you never saw it before. The NAB
did
not limit ad time per hour. The FCC would review your license renewal
application back when licenses were renewed every three years if you went
over 18 minutes an hour, and the voluntary NAB code also recommended 18.


So what's all the fuss at Clear Channel about suddenly providing 40-50
minutes
per hour of commercial-free content, then?

It's not a new concept.

And it's not a "fuss." It's simply worthy of notice in the trade and, to a
minor degree, of interest to the general press.





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