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Old July 16th 03, 03:45 PM
A Ham Elmer
 
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Default What's All Dose Numbers Hams Use

Someone asked:

I hear Hams exchanging numbers -- what do they mean?


During a contest, Hams exchange a combined signal report and a number - like
5906 -- the 59 is a signal strength and readability number URL:
http://www.cebik.com/rst.html For CW its like 599 last nine is for tone.
The 06 is a ITU or CQ zone number.
Zone Numbers (CQ and ITU): http://www.cq-amateur-radio.com/wazrules.html
and http://www.rsgb-hfc.org.uk/wituz.htm
Exchange varies with the contest -- see URL:
http://home.online.no/~janalme/hammain.html See rules

Serial number reports like 59876 -- the 876 is the 876th contact made.

Contests sponsored by 10/10 International use a 10/10 number like 18099 -
URL: http://www.ten-ten.org/

For 6M Dxing/Contesting and now some HFing -- folks pass around Grid Square
Numbers. I get a lot of JA cards (HF QSO's) wanting grid squares.
Example FM16tj. Usually only the FM16 is used in the exchange.
So where is FM16 ? Maps and info following will help. (It's Elizabeth City,
NC)

What are they -- see URL: http://www.arrl.org/locate/gridinfo.html

QRZ and Buckmaster will reveal your grid square -- not precise for the last
two letters but usually close enough. On QRZ look up your call, then see
Detailed Info for your GS.

For precision get a GPS reading, then use the AMSAT converter --
http://www.amsat.org/amsat/toys/gridconv.html

DX Atlas has a nice grid square locator -- displays a typed in grid number
on the maps.
http://www.dxatlas.com/

Artsci has Repeater MapBook 10th edition & Repeater Directory
With GRID SQUARES on every U.S. Map! http://www.artscipub.com/mapbook/


ICOM Site Has a grid Map at URL:
http://www.icomamerica.com/amateur/index.html
Click on AMATEUR, then U.S. Grid Square Map (470 KB PDF)

Another At http://www.amt.org/Multimedia/images/grid-na.gif

Another at URL: http://pages.infinit.net/ve2pij/gridqra.html

And the ARRL offers the VUCC Award based on grid squares -- see URL:
http://www.arrl.org/awards/#vucc

Passin The Good Numbers -- 73
Anon to keep Jim from Spamming and Harrassing me ! Jamesx that is.



  #2   Report Post  
Old July 16th 03, 03:45 PM
A Ham Elmer
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Someone asked:

I hear Hams exchanging numbers -- what do they mean?


During a contest, Hams exchange a combined signal report and a number - like
5906 -- the 59 is a signal strength and readability number URL:
http://www.cebik.com/rst.html For CW its like 599 last nine is for tone.
The 06 is a ITU or CQ zone number.
Zone Numbers (CQ and ITU): http://www.cq-amateur-radio.com/wazrules.html
and http://www.rsgb-hfc.org.uk/wituz.htm
Exchange varies with the contest -- see URL:
http://home.online.no/~janalme/hammain.html See rules

Serial number reports like 59876 -- the 876 is the 876th contact made.

Contests sponsored by 10/10 International use a 10/10 number like 18099 -
URL: http://www.ten-ten.org/

For 6M Dxing/Contesting and now some HFing -- folks pass around Grid Square
Numbers. I get a lot of JA cards (HF QSO's) wanting grid squares.
Example FM16tj. Usually only the FM16 is used in the exchange.
So where is FM16 ? Maps and info following will help. (It's Elizabeth City,
NC)

What are they -- see URL: http://www.arrl.org/locate/gridinfo.html

QRZ and Buckmaster will reveal your grid square -- not precise for the last
two letters but usually close enough. On QRZ look up your call, then see
Detailed Info for your GS.

For precision get a GPS reading, then use the AMSAT converter --
http://www.amsat.org/amsat/toys/gridconv.html

DX Atlas has a nice grid square locator -- displays a typed in grid number
on the maps.
http://www.dxatlas.com/

Artsci has Repeater MapBook 10th edition & Repeater Directory
With GRID SQUARES on every U.S. Map! http://www.artscipub.com/mapbook/


ICOM Site Has a grid Map at URL:
http://www.icomamerica.com/amateur/index.html
Click on AMATEUR, then U.S. Grid Square Map (470 KB PDF)

Another At http://www.amt.org/Multimedia/images/grid-na.gif

Another at URL: http://pages.infinit.net/ve2pij/gridqra.html

And the ARRL offers the VUCC Award based on grid squares -- see URL:
http://www.arrl.org/awards/#vucc

Passin The Good Numbers -- 73
Anon to keep Jim from Spamming and Harrassing me ! Jamesx that is.


  #3   Report Post  
Old July 16th 03, 04:44 PM
William E. Sabin
 
Posts: n/a
Default

A Ham Elmer wrote:
Someone asked:


I hear Hams exchanging numbers -- what do they mean?



During a contest, Hams exchange a combined signal report and a number - like
5906 -- the 59 is a signal strength and readability number URL:
http://www.cebik.com/rst.html


The basis for the S-unit is presumed to be as follows:

S9 corresponds to 100 microvolts "open-circuit"
from a 50 ohm generator. This corresponds to a 50
microvolt reading on the signal generator meter
scale. It also corresponds to -73 dBm in terms of
an "available power" level. The signal generator
scale markings coincide with this. Everyone seems
to agree about this much.

However, this does not mean that the actual signal
level into the receiver is 50 microvolts, because
we very seldom know the actual input impedance of
the receiver. Using "available" and "open-circuit"
we do not need to know the input impedance of the
receiver. The receiver is designed to operate from
a 50 ohm generator and that knowledge is sufficient.

The number of dB in an S-unit below the S9 level
is not, as many believe, guaranteed to be 6 dB per
S-unit. Different manufacturers have used numbers
as low as an "average" of 4 dB (Collins for
example). In vacuum tube receivers especially,
some latitude has always been necessary.

In my homebrew solid-state receiver (2003 design)
I use 5 dB because that correlates with the
"intuitive" evaluations that I have developed over
the years (that is my option for my personal
receiver). My S-meter, using precision circuitry,
is closely calibrated and marked based on accurate
sig gen readings. Also, my receiver gain does not
vary more than 1 dB across any ham band and 2 dB
from the 160 to 10 meter bands because of the way
the receiver is designed. This calibration is
quite stable and reliable. I check it frequently.

A picture of my homebrew receiver is on
QRZ.COM(W0IYH). Note the large high-quality analog
S-meter.

Bill W0IYH

  #4   Report Post  
Old July 16th 03, 04:44 PM
William E. Sabin
 
Posts: n/a
Default

A Ham Elmer wrote:
Someone asked:


I hear Hams exchanging numbers -- what do they mean?



During a contest, Hams exchange a combined signal report and a number - like
5906 -- the 59 is a signal strength and readability number URL:
http://www.cebik.com/rst.html


The basis for the S-unit is presumed to be as follows:

S9 corresponds to 100 microvolts "open-circuit"
from a 50 ohm generator. This corresponds to a 50
microvolt reading on the signal generator meter
scale. It also corresponds to -73 dBm in terms of
an "available power" level. The signal generator
scale markings coincide with this. Everyone seems
to agree about this much.

However, this does not mean that the actual signal
level into the receiver is 50 microvolts, because
we very seldom know the actual input impedance of
the receiver. Using "available" and "open-circuit"
we do not need to know the input impedance of the
receiver. The receiver is designed to operate from
a 50 ohm generator and that knowledge is sufficient.

The number of dB in an S-unit below the S9 level
is not, as many believe, guaranteed to be 6 dB per
S-unit. Different manufacturers have used numbers
as low as an "average" of 4 dB (Collins for
example). In vacuum tube receivers especially,
some latitude has always been necessary.

In my homebrew solid-state receiver (2003 design)
I use 5 dB because that correlates with the
"intuitive" evaluations that I have developed over
the years (that is my option for my personal
receiver). My S-meter, using precision circuitry,
is closely calibrated and marked based on accurate
sig gen readings. Also, my receiver gain does not
vary more than 1 dB across any ham band and 2 dB
from the 160 to 10 meter bands because of the way
the receiver is designed. This calibration is
quite stable and reliable. I check it frequently.

A picture of my homebrew receiver is on
QRZ.COM(W0IYH). Note the large high-quality analog
S-meter.

Bill W0IYH



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