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Old June 5th 08, 05:10 PM posted to rec.radio.shortwave
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Default Radio’s Obituary

Radio’s Obituary
By Jerry Del Colliano

On May 31st 2008, I read an obituary for radio.

No, I didn’t write it because I believe that there is life after
terrestrial radio towers and transmitters and that radio can still be
a good free cash flow business for many more years. But operators need
to do a better job programming to the available audience (baby boomers
while they last and older Gen Xers).

The next generation is lost.

The death notice I speak of appeared in The Washington Post as very
able reporter Marc Fisher announced an end to the radio column he has
written for the best part of the last 13 years.

He laments the loss of the likes of all-night radio personality Long
John Nebel and Don Imus in his earlier, less cranky days.

Fisher argues that hardly anyone who turns on the radio is being lured
into what he calls “intimate obsessions with voices that return each
night, baring their souls and insisting on a relationship with the
listener”.

His analysis – agree with it or not – is as follows:

“Depressed by the rise of new technologies and their own fading place
in the media landscape, neither those who own and run AM and FM radio
stations nor even the new (but not new enough) satellite pay radio
services are nurturing the kind of eccentric, iconoclastic voices that
made radio so alluring from the 1950s into the '80s. Through those
decades, when TV dominated American popular culture, radio was at once
a mass medium and a clubhouse, a place where listeners could believe
themselves to be part of an unseen community of like-minded people.
Today, with the Internet having taken over as the primary provider of
semi-private meeting spots, radio stations are cutting costs and
bleeding talent, ceding the leading edge to the Web's collection of
micro-audiences and the iPod's promise of infinite, but closely held,
choice”.

Fisher doesn’t like the lack of music variety, either. Of course, as
many radio programmers know, neither does the audience.

He correctly states that “Radio, shedding talent as fast as it loses
audience, is rapidly becoming irrelevant to the younger generation.
Yet most Americans still listen to something for much of the day.
Radio could be the way into those ears, but only if it invests in
creating compelling reasons to be there, only if it grabs hold of us
the way the voices of past decades connected to the loves, pains and
dreams of young listeners. As always, the future lies in the past”.

Houston, we have a programming problem – and it’s not rocket science.

It’s not the People Meter (that will eventually help broadcasters).
It’s not how many stations a public company can own but how many they
can actually run effectively and profitably.

When the CEOs and COOs of consolidated radio have little or no
experience with the actual product – and don’t even think it’s worth
the investment to hire and support people who do – you’ve got the
first of what will eventually be many obituaries for a once vibrant
industry of great and talented people and their bosses who are on the
whole clueless as to what to do.

Again, don’t trust me. Don’t trust Marc Fisher.

Go to the ratings – their ratings.

Share prices have declined steadily since most of the public radio
groups consolidated.

Twelves years later it now appears that radio consolidators knew how
to buy stations using other people’s money. They just weren’t good at
running them – if share price is any indicator.

It’s one thing for me to kick the radio industry in the ass every once
in a while to try and wake it up – right the wrongs – launch it into
the digital future, but it is quite another for a consumer publication
with the prestige of The Washington Post to go public with our dirty
laundry.

Fisher was right to do so because when radio became insignificant
enough that the editors of a large metropolitan daily decided to stop
writing about it – then they must feel the medium is not worth
covering.

Radio didn’t begin its decline with consolidation -- although little
about big groups has helped the industry grow.

It began in the late 80’s when stations started imitating themselves.
Owners still spent plenty of money on the product, but creative people
felt the pressure to better the success they were having. (Take
morning shows – when outrageous morning shows hit the scene, you know
what happened next – more outrageous morning shows).

We stopped innovating.

Now we know that and able radio people are in a weaker position to
innovate – it’s not in the budget, not in the plan, not in the purview
of today’s corporate decision maker.

Radio One’s Al Liggins wouldn’t know a programming solution if it bit
him on the butt – my opinion. Nothing personal.

Citdael’s Farid Suleman can’t even recognize the talent he employs –
let alone grow more talent and new shows. Someone tell Farid that he’s
the CEO not the Group Program Director.

Clear Channel’s John Hogan now has a resume strewn with management
reorganizations, cutbacks, unremarkable programming and ratings
declines --- perfect! Just what an ailing industry needs.

Cumulus wanted to exit stage left from public ownership because it
didn’t make sense to be a public company in a world where there is no
more funding to buy stations. At least they pulled their offer without
making a scene – the kind that Clear Channel made.

Saga is one of the groups publicly fighting posting – a procedure that
advertisers want and radio stations will eventually have to do – after
they languish in the past for another few years. Maybe posting won't
be required in smaller markets now, but advertisers in the major
markets are clamoring for it.

Cox fights the People Meter publicly in front of the advertising
community while signing a long-term contract to support it. Can you
shout any louder to advertisers not to trust its audience measurement
system?

Beasley just wants the People Meter to go away so that no other group
has to go through what they had to go through in Philadelphia. How
helpful is that?

More years of paper diaries in a digital world.

It goes on and on. Plenty of radio companies living in the past and
fighting the future.

The speed of the leader determines the speed of the team and that’s
the first place to look for the fine mess some radio CEOs have gotten
us into.

It doesn't have to be this way. There is a lot of talent in the radio
industry. But you can't grow a business by cutting it back. You can't
solve problems from quarter to quarter -- especially when there is
little left to cut.

Some might get mad at The Post or at The New York Daily News which is
also reportedly planning to scale back radio coverage. But their anger
should be directed at someone else -- the person running today's
influential radio groups.

They had ever advantage -- unprecedented ownership opportunities, a
virtual monopoly, public money to grow the newly-formed groups and
most importantly -- stations that were built solid by talented people
before consolidation.

They were handed a golden industry on a silver platter.

In just about every other business that under performs their boards
would have had the CEOs heads on a platter -- fast.

In radio, when a key executive continually runs his or her radio group
into the ground, their board gives them – a raise.

The one person in each company who could breath life into the radio
industry is killing it.

http://insidemusicmedia.blogspot.com...-obituary.html

  #2   Report Post  
Old June 5th 08, 05:19 PM posted to rec.radio.shortwave
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Default (OT) : Another Anti AM&FM Radio Bashing Post -by- Gallant 17

On Jun 5, 9:10*am, gallant17 wrote:
Radio’s Obituary
By Jerry Del Colliano

On May 31st 2008, I read an obituary for radio.

No, I didn’t write it because I believe that there is life after
terrestrial radio towers and transmitters and that radio can still be
a good free cash flow business for many more years. But operators need
to do a better job programming to the available audience (baby boomers
while they last and older Gen Xers).

The next generation is lost.

The death notice I speak of appeared in The Washington Post as very
able reporter Marc Fisher announced an end to the radio column he has
written for the best part of the last 13 years.

He laments the loss of the likes of all-night radio personality Long
John Nebel and Don Imus in his earlier, less cranky days.

Fisher argues that hardly anyone who turns on the radio is being lured
into what he calls “intimate obsessions with voices that return each
night, baring their souls and insisting on a relationship with the
listener”.

His analysis – agree with it or not – is as follows:

“Depressed by the rise of new technologies and their own fading place
in the media landscape, neither those who own and run AM and FM radio
stations nor even the new (but not new enough) satellite pay radio
services are nurturing the kind of eccentric, iconoclastic voices that
made radio so alluring from the 1950s into the '80s. Through those
decades, when TV dominated American popular culture, radio was at once
a mass medium and a clubhouse, a place where listeners could believe
themselves to be part of an unseen community of like-minded people.
Today, with the Internet having taken over as the primary provider of
semi-private meeting spots, radio stations are cutting costs and
bleeding talent, ceding the leading edge to the Web's collection of
micro-audiences and the iPod's promise of infinite, but closely held,
choice”.

Fisher doesn’t like the lack of music variety, either. Of course, as
many radio programmers know, neither does the audience.

He correctly states that “Radio, shedding talent as fast as it loses
audience, is rapidly becoming irrelevant to the younger generation.
Yet most Americans still listen to something for much of the day.
Radio could be the way into those ears, but only if it invests in
creating compelling reasons to be there, only if it grabs hold of us
the way the voices of past decades connected to the loves, pains and
dreams of young listeners. As always, the future lies in the past”.

Houston, we have a programming problem – and it’s not rocket science.

It’s not the People Meter (that will eventually help broadcasters).
It’s not how many stations a public company can own but how many they
can actually run effectively and profitably.

When the CEOs and COOs of consolidated radio have little or no
experience with the actual product – and don’t even think it’s worth
the investment to hire and support people who do – you’ve got the
first of what will eventually be many obituaries for a once vibrant
industry of great and talented people and their bosses who are on the
whole clueless as to what to do.

Again, don’t trust me. Don’t trust Marc Fisher.

Go to the ratings – their ratings.

Share prices have declined steadily since most of the public radio
groups consolidated.

Twelves years later it now appears that radio consolidators knew how
to buy stations using other people’s money. They just weren’t good at
running them – if share price is any indicator.

It’s one thing for me to kick the radio industry in the ass every once
in a while to try and wake it up – right the wrongs – launch it into
the digital future, but it is quite another for a consumer publication
with the prestige of The Washington Post to go public with our dirty
laundry.

Fisher was right to do so because when radio became insignificant
enough that the editors of a large metropolitan daily decided to stop
writing about it – then they must feel the medium is not worth
covering.

Radio didn’t begin its decline with consolidation -- although little
about big groups has helped the industry grow.

It began in the late 80’s when stations started imitating themselves.
Owners still spent plenty of money on the product, but creative people
felt the pressure to better the success they were having. (Take
morning shows – when outrageous morning shows hit the scene, you know
what happened next – more outrageous morning shows).

We stopped innovating.

Now we know that and able radio people are in a weaker position to
innovate – it’s not in the budget, not in the plan, not in the purview
of today’s corporate decision maker.

Radio One’s Al Liggins wouldn’t know a programming solution if it bit
him on the butt – my opinion. Nothing personal.

Citdael’s Farid Suleman can’t even recognize the talent he employs –
let alone grow more talent and new shows. Someone tell Farid that he’s
the CEO not the Group Program Director.

Clear Channel’s John Hogan now has a resume strewn with management
reorganizations, cutbacks, unremarkable programming and ratings
declines --- perfect! Just what an ailing industry needs.

Cumulus wanted to exit stage left from public ownership because it
didn’t make sense to be a public company in a world where there is no
more funding to buy stations. At least they pulled their offer without
making a scene – the kind that Clear Channel made.

Saga is one of the groups publicly fighting posting – a procedure that
advertisers want and radio stations will eventually have to do – after
they languish in the past for another few years. Maybe posting won't
be required in smaller markets now, but advertisers in the major
markets are clamoring for it.

Cox fights the People Meter publicly in front of the advertising
community while signing a long-term contract to support it. Can you
shout any louder to advertisers not to trust its audience measurement
system?

Beasley just wants the People Meter to go away so that no other group
has to go through what they had to go through in Philadelphia. How
helpful is that?

More years of paper diaries in a digital world.

It goes on and on. Plenty of radio companies living in the past and
fighting the future.

The speed of the leader determines the speed of the team and that’s
the first place to look for the fine mess some radio CEOs have gotten
us into.

It doesn't have to be this way. There is a lot of talent in the radio
industry. But you can't grow a business by cutting it back. You can't
solve problems from quarter to quarter -- especially when there is
little left to cut.

Some might get mad at The Post or at The New York Daily News which is
also reportedly planning to scale back radio coverage. But their anger
should be directed at someone else -- the person running today's
influential radio groups.

They had ever advantage -- unprecedented ownership opportunities, a
virtual monopoly, public money to grow the newly-formed groups and
most importantly -- stations that were built solid by talented people
before consolidation.

They were handed a golden industry on a silver platter.

In just about every other business that under performs their boards
would have had the CEOs heads on a platter -- fast.

In radio, when a key executive continually runs his or her radio group
into the ground, their board gives them – a raise.

The one person in each company who could breath life into the radio
industry is killing it.

http://insidemusicmedia.blogspot.com...-obituary.html


(OT) : Another Anti AM&FM Radio Bashing Post -by- Gallant 17
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Old June 6th 08, 02:22 AM posted to rec.radio.shortwave
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Posts: 126
Default Radio’s Obituary

I long for the "good ole days" when I could traverse the am dial and
listen to a different talk show host on nearly every frequency. Even
as a youngster I was familiar with the hot issues of the day in every
city I could pick up on my radio - Omaha, Chicago, St. Louis, San
Antonio, Oklahoma City, Salt Lake City, Cleveland, Cincinnati, Kansas
City, Denver and whatever other signal I could nab during the night.

Thanks to Herb Jepco, Jim White, Jack Wheeler, John Cigna, Bill Barker
and myriads of others whose names have been forgotten I felt that I
had a friend in all those cities. And you would become so familiar
with the regular callers that you would worry about them if they
hadn't called for awhile.

Syndication has destroyed all that. Now all scanning the dial from end
to end yields is know it all gasbag right wing errand boys, sports
talk screamers with their double digit IQ callers, ufo and conspiracy
loons, and of course the bible thumpers who will save your soul for a
donation.

There are still a few local night time programs but they are few. And
the ones that are there are pale comparisons to the forerunners of
days of old.

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Old June 6th 08, 02:41 AM posted to rec.radio.shortwave
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Posts: 856
Default Radio's Obituary


"Tex" wrote in message
...
I long for the "good ole days" when I could traverse the am dial and
listen to a different talk show host on nearly every frequency. Even
as a youngster I was familiar with the hot issues of the day in every
city I could pick up on my radio - Omaha, Chicago, St. Louis, San
Antonio, Oklahoma City, Salt Lake City, Cleveland, Cincinnati, Kansas
City, Denver and whatever other signal I could nab during the night.

Thanks to Herb Jepco, Jim White, Jack Wheeler, John Cigna, Bill Barker
and myriads of others whose names have been forgotten I felt that I
had a friend in all those cities. And you would become so familiar
with the regular callers that you would worry about them if they
hadn't called for awhile.


I miss Herb Jepco, and his predecessor, Ira Blue, and the rest of the great
KGO talkers.. along with the greats from KSL. I spent many a night listening
to those folks back in a day when everyone had a chance to have their say,
not just the hand-picked few, and things were a lot more even-handed and
sane.



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Old June 6th 08, 03:29 AM posted to rec.radio.shortwave
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Posts: 126
Default Radio's Obituary

On Jun 5, 8:41 pm, "Brenda Ann" wrote:
I miss Herb Jepco, and his predecessor, Ira Blue, and the rest of the great
KGO talkers.. along with the greats from KSL. I spent many a night listening
to those folks back in a day when everyone had a chance to have their say,
not just the hand-picked few, and things were a lot more even-handed and
sane.


Herb Jepco calls to mind a Christmas vacation during my high school
years - two weeks of no school and "sleeping in"! I listened to him on
KSL until 4 a.m. or so every night he was on. And did I have a time of
it changing my sleep habits when school resumed! I remember feeling
like I was away from my family when I could no longer stay up late
enough to listen to his show.

And you are on the mark about the ambiance of his show. He was so
cordial - more interested in having a conversation than scoring
debating points or showing how much smarter he was than the callers
and listeners (unlike the talk show screamers of today).

Bill Barker on KOA Denver and Bernard Metzler out of New York were the
only others I can think of that matched Herb's genuine niceness and
civility.



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Old June 6th 08, 03:16 PM posted to rec.radio.shortwave
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Default For the Re-Birth of AM/MW Radio -versus- Radio’s Obituary

On Jun 5, 6:22*pm, Tex wrote:
I long for the "good ole days" when I could traverse the am dial and
listen to a different talk show host on nearly every frequency. Even
as a youngster I was familiar with the hot issues of the day in every
city I could pick up on my radio - Omaha, Chicago, St. Louis, San
Antonio, *Oklahoma City, Salt Lake City, Cleveland, Cincinnati, Kansas
City, Denver and whatever other signal I could nab during the night.

Thanks to Herb Jepco, Jim White, Jack Wheeler, John Cigna, Bill Barker
and myriads of others whose names have been forgotten I felt that I
had a friend in all those cities. And you would become so familiar
with the regular callers that you would worry about them if they
hadn't called for awhile.

Syndication has destroyed all that. Now all scanning the dial from end
to end yields is know it all gasbag right wing errand boys, sports
talk screamers with their double digit IQ callers, *ufo and conspiracy
loons, and of course the bible thumpers who will save your soul for a
donation.

There are still a few local night time programs but they are few. And
the ones that are there are pale comparisons to the forerunners of
days of old.


For the Re-Birth of AM/MW Radio -versus- Radio’s Obituary

FCC should Mandate that Any and All 50 KW Nightime
AM/MW Radio Stations from 9 PM to Midnight have three
things : local hosts, Local Hosts. LOCAL HOSTS !
-if not- Cut them back to 15 KW.

Coast-to-Coast AM can be on 400 Radios Stations
instead of 500 and the 'other' 100 can have 'Original'
Local Content on the AM/MW Radio Band.

ah -if- i ruled the world ~ RHF
  #7   Report Post  
Old June 6th 08, 03:43 PM posted to rec.radio.shortwave
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Default Great Memories of the Wonderful Voice of... Ira Blue & KGO [Was :Radio's Obituary]

On Jun 5, 6:41*pm, "Brenda Ann" wrote:
"Tex" wrote in message

...

I long for the "good ole days" when I could traverse the am dial and
listen to a different talk show host on nearly every frequency. Even
as a youngster I was familiar with the hot issues of the day in every
city I could pick up on my radio - Omaha, Chicago, St. Louis, San
Antonio, *Oklahoma City, Salt Lake City, Cleveland, Cincinnati, Kansas
City, Denver and whatever other signal I could nab during the night.


Thanks to Herb Jepco, Jim White, Jack Wheeler, John Cigna, Bill Barker
and myriads of others whose names have been forgotten I felt that I
had a friend in all those cities. And you would become so familiar
with the regular callers that you would worry about them if they
hadn't called for awhile.


I miss Herb Jepco, and his predecessor, Ira Blue, and the rest of the great
KGO talkers.. along with the greats from KSL. I spent many a night listening
to those folks back in a day when everyone had a chance to have their say,
not just the hand-picked few, and things were a lot more even-handed and
sane.


Great Memories of the Wonderful Voice of... Ira Blue
on KGO-AM 810 kHz Radio from San Francisco, CA
IRA BLUE = http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ira_Blue
http://www.answers.com/Ira+Blue?cat=entertainment
http://www.hard-core-dx.com/archive/irca/msg42396.html
http://www.radio-info.com/smf/index.php?topic=97682.50
http://pdxradio.net/feedback/message...tml?1013865224
MUSIC = http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhapsody_in_Blue
SOUND = http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yiyc9Ak3EtQ

Celebrating The Bay Area Radio Hall of Fame Class of 2006
LISTEN TO - Ira Blue on KGO, San Francisco
http://www.bayarearadio.org/hof/2006_barhof.shtml
CLASS OF 2006 - MODERN ERA - IRA BLUE*
* Ira Blue - A staple of KQW, KNBC and KGO as a
Sportscaster from the 1940s, he also helped pioneer
KGO's usher in nascent Talk Show Format with his
Eclectic Broadcasts from the Hungry I in San Francisco.

yes - i hear voices in the night... on the radio ~ RHF
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Old June 10th 08, 09:24 PM posted to rec.radio.shortwave
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Default Great Memories of the Wonderful Voice of... Ira Blue & KGO [Was :Radio's Obituary]

Above mentions Ira Blue as a Bay Area Sportscaster.

He was best known while behind the mike for the Seals (San Francisco's
minor league hockey team), alongside announcer Rory Story.

Seals got 12,000 fans a night selling out the Cow Place, while the
major league NBA Warriors drew only 8,000 at the S.F. Civic Center
(Bill King announcing).

Story's signature line: Shot on Goal!

Blue's: Eh, go gargle with razor blades...

Bill Hatfield

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Old June 11th 08, 11:01 AM posted to rec.radio.shortwave
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Default Great Memories of the Wonderful Voice of... Ira Blue & KGO [Was :Radio's Obituary]

On Jun 10, 1:24*pm, wrote:
-
- Above mentions Ira Blue as a Bay Area Sportscaster.
-
- He was best known while behind the mike for the
- Seals (San Francisco's minor league hockey team),
- alongside announcer Rory Story.
-
- Seals got 12,000 fans a night selling out the Cow Place,
- while the major league NBA Warriors drew only 8,000 at
- the S.F. Civic Center (Bill King announcing).
-
- Story's signature line: Shot on Goal!
-
- Blue's: Eh, go gargle with razor blades...
-
- Bill Hatfield

BH,

-fwiw- The Cow Palace May Be History
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/articl.../MNE0V9LPS.DTL
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Old August 1st 17, 02:27 PM posted to rec.radio.shortwave
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Posts: 476
Default Radio¢s Obituary

fred k. engels wrote:

May 31st 2008!!!!!!!!!!!!


Long Delayed Echo!!!!!!!!!!!


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