Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Old March 18th 07, 09:38 PM posted to rec.radio.amateur.moderated
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by RadioBanter: Mar 2007
Posts: 41
Default Call signs for foreign amateurs operating in US


In the old days, a foreign amateur operating in the US, or a US amateur
operating in a foreign country, would use his own call sign, a slant bar,
and the prefix of the country or location in which he is operating, e.g.
"G5ABC/W1".

Somewhere along the way that got changed so that the prefix is now
inserted ahead of the call sign instead of after, e.g. "W1/G5ABC".

When did that rule change go into effect? It must have been sometime
during the 1990's when I was inactive on ham radio ... one of the many
rule changes that surprised me when I got back into it in 2001, such as
the 5 WPM code requirement for Extras for whom it used to be 20 WPM...



  #2   Report Post  
Old March 18th 07, 09:51 PM posted to rec.radio.amateur.moderated
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by RadioBanter: Jun 2007
Posts: 67
Default Call signs for foreign amateurs operating in US

"Rick" wrote ...
In the old days, a foreign amateur operating in the US, or a US
amateur
operating in a foreign country, would use his own call sign, a slant
bar,
and the prefix of the country or location in which he is operating,
e.g.
"G5ABC/W1".

Somewhere along the way that got changed so that the prefix is now
inserted ahead of the call sign instead of after, e.g. "W1/G5ABC".

When did that rule change go into effect? It must have been sometime
during the 1990's when I was inactive on ham radio ... one of the many
rule changes that surprised me when I got back into it in 2001, such
as
the 5 WPM code requirement for Extras for whom it used to be 20 WPM...


Don't look now, but it is zero WPM. For everyone. :-)

When I sat for my written test, I took the one for General
also. I hadn't studied for it at all, but it didn't cost anything
extra. I missed it by two points, else I would be a General
today. I guess I'll have to break down and study this time.

Richard Crowley KE7GKP

  #3   Report Post  
Old March 18th 07, 11:29 PM posted to rec.radio.amateur.moderated
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by RadioBanter: Feb 2007
Posts: 51
Default Call signs for foreign amateurs operating in US

"Rick" wrote in message
news
In the old days, a foreign amateur operating in the US,
or a US amateur operating in a foreign country, would use
his own call sign, a slant bar, and the prefix of the
country or location in which he is operating, e.g.
"G5ABC/W1".

Somewhere along the way that got changed so that the
prefix is now inserted ahead of the call sign instead of
after, e.g. "W1/G5ABC".

When did that rule change go into effect? It must have
been sometime during the 1990's when I was inactive on
ham radio ... one of the many rule changes that surprised
me when I got back into it in 2001, such as the 5 WPM
code requirement for Extras for whom it used to be 20
WPM...


Hmm, interesting. The last time I operated in the US was 2004 and I
definitely used G6URP/W6 (in California) then.

Having said that, I just read my licence conditions which came into effect
when the new "lifetime" licence was issued in January of this year and you
would appear to be correct.

Ivor


  #4   Report Post  
Old March 18th 07, 11:32 PM posted to rec.radio.amateur.moderated
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by RadioBanter: Mar 2007
Posts: 1
Default Call signs for foreign amateurs operating in US


"Richard Crowley" wrote
..................
When I sat for my written test, I took the one for General
also. I hadn't studied for it at all, but it didn't cost anything
extra. I missed it by two points, else I would be a General
today. I guess I'll have to break down and study this time.

Richard Crowley KE7GKP


You shouldn't need to study this time? Remember you are
an experienced candidate by now as it will be your second
try! 8-)

73 LA7SG - Sven


  #5   Report Post  
Old March 19th 07, 12:55 AM posted to rec.radio.amateur.moderated
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by RadioBanter: Jan 2007
Posts: 300
Default Call signs for foreign amateurs operating in US

On Sun, 18 Mar 2007 15:38:07 CST, Rick wrote:

Somewhere along the way that got changed so that the prefix is now
inserted ahead of the call sign instead of after, e.g. "W1/G5ABC".

When did that rule change go into effect?


That change went into effect with the Commission's Order FCC 98-204
released October 1, 1988 in WT Docket 98-20, setting up the ULS and
authorized CEPT and CITEL foreign licensed amateurs to operate in the
US without formal US reciprocal licensing.
--

73 de K2ASP - Phil Kane
ARRL Volunteer Counsel

email: k2asp [at] arrl [dot] net



  #6   Report Post  
Old March 19th 07, 01:46 AM posted to rec.radio.amateur.moderated
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by RadioBanter: Feb 2007
Posts: 51
Default Call signs for foreign amateurs operating in US

"Phil Kane" wrote in message

On Sun, 18 Mar 2007 15:38:07 CST, Rick
wrote:

Somewhere along the way that got changed so that the
prefix is now inserted ahead of the call sign instead
of after, e.g. "W1/G5ABC".

When did that rule change go into effect?


That change went into effect with the Commission's Order
FCC 98-204 released October 1, 1988 in WT Docket 98-20,
setting up the ULS and authorized CEPT and CITEL foreign
licensed amateurs to operate in the US without formal US
reciprocal licensing.


Are you certain of the date..? I certainly had to apply for reciprocal
"Alien Permits" the first 2 times I operated in the US, in 1993 & 1995.
From 2000 on I never had to apply for one, but I'm sure I still put the

local prefix after my own call rather than before.

73 Ivor G6URP


  #7   Report Post  
Old March 19th 07, 02:39 AM posted to rec.radio.amateur.moderated
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by RadioBanter: Jan 2007
Posts: 300
Default Call signs for foreign amateurs operating in US

On Sun, 18 Mar 2007 19:46:44 CST, "Ivor Jones"
wrote:

That change went into effect with the Commission's Order
FCC 98-204 released October 1, 1988 in WT Docket 98-20,
setting up the ULS and authorized CEPT and CITEL foreign
licensed amateurs to operate in the US without formal US
reciprocal licensing.


Are you certain of the date..?


You are right. It should have been October 21, 1998. My typo error.
--

73 de K2ASP - Phil Kane

From a Clearing in the Silicon Forest

Beaverton (Washington County) Oregon

e-mail: k2asp [at] arrl [dot] net

  #8   Report Post  
Old March 19th 07, 07:07 AM posted to rec.radio.amateur.moderated
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by RadioBanter: Jun 2007
Posts: 67
Default Call signs for foreign amateurs operating in US

"Sven Pran" wrote...
You shouldn't need to study this time? Remember you are
an experienced candidate by now as it will be your second
try! 8-)


I have a hard time memorizing the band limits.
I can program my equipment to stay within the
allotted bands. I usually don't make my brain
remember stuff like that. :-(

  #9   Report Post  
Old March 23rd 07, 01:53 PM posted to rec.radio.amateur.moderated
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by RadioBanter: Feb 2007
Posts: 13
Default Call signs for foreign amateurs operating in US

It was a little different for me because I am a dual citizen
(Australia and the US). When I inquired they said I couldn't use my
Australian license in the US, even though I hadn't set foot in the US
in decades, because I maintained US citizenship, so I had to take US
tests and have a US callsign when visiting.

On Mar 19, 2:07 am, "Richard Crowley" wrote:
"Sven Pran" wrote...
You shouldn't need to study this time? Remember you are
an experienced candidate by now as it will be your second
try! 8-)


I have a hard time memorizing the band limits.
I can program my equipment to stay within the
allotted bands. I usually don't make my brain
remember stuff like that. :-(



  #10   Report Post  
Old March 29th 07, 10:35 PM posted to rec.radio.amateur.moderated
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by RadioBanter: Feb 2007
Posts: 25
Default Call signs for foreign amateurs operating in US

It was a little different for me because I am a dual citizen
(Australia and the US). When I inquired they said I couldn't use my
Australian license in the US, even though I hadn't set foot in the US
in decades, because I maintained US citizenship, so I had to take US
tests and have a US callsign when visiting.


That's cos Australia and the US don't have a reciprocal agreement.

I'm dual citizen of Australia and the UK, and I can use my VK call in the UK
for up to 3 months if visiting. Not that I'd want to cos I still got my UK
license

I am surprised that the US don't issue temporary visitors licenses though.
Aus and UK do that.
--
Jack VK2CJC / MM0AXL
FISTS# 9666
Mid North Coast Amateur Radio Group
http://www.qsl.net/mm0axl/mncarg/index.html




Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Air plane call signs. [email protected] Shortwave 0 June 8th 11 04:38 AM
Ø How to make them for call signs Caveat Lector Dx 5 July 8th 07 03:15 PM
Halloween Call Signs Keyboard In The Wilderness Shortwave 0 October 31st 04 03:15 PM
old call signs Stephen CB 3 October 22nd 04 05:42 PM
Call Signs? Jim CB 12 January 21st 04 08:34 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 08:57 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©2004-2022 RadioBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Radio"

 

Copyright © 2017