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Old April 15th 10, 05:39 PM posted to rec.radio.shortwave
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Default Ultra Heavy BCB Dx'ing

On Apr 15, 11:48*am, sctvguy1 wrote:
Geoffrey S. Mendelson wrote:
dave wrote:


Dude, you're being jammed. *Jerusalem is no more high tech (no more
noise prone) than any other modern city, where mediumwave still works
reasonably well and HF is still quite clean.


No, it's loaded with broadband noise up until just below 14mHz. Lots of
computers, digital devices and DSL internet. EU radiation standards which
are a lot looser and easier to cheat.


* Why do they always blow up the power plants?


Who? If you are referring to Gaza, they get most of their power from
Israel and neglect to pay for it. In fact the one power plant that is
there was just damaged by the locals. It wasn't much of one, it produced
less than 1/3 of what they used.


Geoff.


If I may ask, why did you move from Philly? *I am here in "beautiful" South
Florida, and my friend, originally from Philly, would move back in a second,
if he had the chance! *BTW, I listen a lot to WPHT with my CCrane MW/SW with
the twin ferrite antenna and a passive loop. *Hooked on Smerconish, Dom
Giordano, Gary Rnel, etc. *Great talk station!


Hi
I was born and raised and lived in Philly for 49 years. I listened
to good but gone WWDB FM 96.5 and enjoyed Irv Homer, Wynn Moore, Frank
Ford, Bernie Hermann etc but the old neighborhood is crap. I am
listening from up near Scranton and Wilkes-Barre PA. WILK 980 AM
tries especially Steve Corbett but they ain't no WWDB.
Mike

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Old April 15th 10, 06:33 PM posted to rec.radio.shortwave
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Default Ultra Heavy BCB Dx'ing

On Apr 15, 9:30*am, Michael Black wrote:
On Thu, 15 Apr 2010, Bob Dobbs wrote:
Geoffrey S. Mendelson wrote:


~~~


don't buy a SW, especially ham, receiver and expect it to perform
well on the AM BCB.


Why not?
I didn't initially buy any of my HAM rigs for use on AMBCB,
however a couple have turned out to perform very nicely there.
They're very stable (TCXO), have adjustable IF bandwidth and shift,
one of them has a convenient band scan to spot stations,
another actually has a spectrum scope to look at the band.
And even though that band is always full at night
it helps to see what's out there during the day.


First, there was a long period when ham equipment wasn't particularly
good on AM, since most hams were using SSB. *So no wider filters for
AM, sometimes there wasn't even an AM detector, and certainly no
synchronous detector that everyone seems to think should be mandatory
now. *I suspect that has changed a bit recently, since some of the
techniques used to improve the design allows for adding better AM
reception without any real cost, and a lot of the ham manufacturers
like to be able to offer lots of bells and whistles, whether or not
they are needed.

Another obvious reason is that for a long time any receivers in amateur
radio equipment covered only the ham bands. *That was a good thing,
since you got much better bandspread; if you wanted general coverage
you would have started with one of those to begin with. *That too has
changed, now it's as easy to have a general coverage receiver as it is
to have a ham band only receiver, and again it's a selling point.

But, according to some, there may be attenuation that comes into play
on the AM broadcast band, or some other limitation as the frequency goes
down. *Or, RF amplification may be left off, so the receiver can
better deal with the strong local signals.

I can't really imagine a manufacturer not using the existing receiver
circuitry for the AM broadcast band, since it's just a matter of
extending the frequency range. *But maybe there are some out there
that toss in another IC for the AM band, resulting in no special
performance. *I remember getting into an argument with a local about
whether their shortwave portable receiver would actually be outstanding on
the FM band. *In that case, whatever great design is used on the shortwave
bands is lost, since a whole different circuit is needed for FM, and
thus they add a whole other FM receiver, usually an IC, which doesn't
have to be anything special; you are paying extra money for the shortwave,
not the FM band.

But, maybe the main reason was in the paragraph about the Superradio.
That one gets lost of praise, but it really is a pretty generic design.
The one thing it does have is a good loopstick antenna, and that's
certainly one area where ham equipment lacks. *None will have any sort
of built in antenna, so one will need something external. *That may often
be seen as some wire hanging off the antenna jack, and while that works, a
directional antenna is pretty useful on the AM broadcast band.

A receiver that has a built in antenna is going to be matched to that
small antenna, while a general coverage receiver with no built in antenna
may require external circuitry to best use a small antenna.

* * Michael


Ditto on the lack of a good antenna for BCB. As always, I suggest a
Wellbrook loop. I've used the ALA100 and home brew loops for NDBs, so
BCB isn't an issue.
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Old April 15th 10, 08:39 PM posted to rec.radio.shortwave
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sctvguy1 wrote:
If I may ask, why did you move from Philly? I am here in "beautiful" South
Florida, and my friend, originally from Philly, would move back in a second,
if he had the chance! BTW, I listen a lot to WPHT with my CCrane MW/SW with
the twin ferrite antenna and a passive loop. Hooked on Smerconish, Dom
Giordano, Gary Rnel, etc. Great talk station!


Mostly to live in a Jewish neighborhood.

Seriously, when I met my (now) wife, after a few weeks of casual dating
she said that if I wanted to get serious with her, I had to agree to
move to Israel if we got married.

It's a very nice place to live, complete with good socialized medicince,
one of the most liberal democracies on the planet, reasonable rent,
almost no street crime, etc.

Taxes are high, but no higher than they will be in 2015 in the US.

Philly has some nice things, but lots of street crime, lots of murders,
and while there are 8 medical schools within 75 miles, 9 if you count
Princenton Plainsboro Teaching Hospital, plus many other hospitals,
most of the residents can't afford to use them.

Geoff.

--
Geoffrey S. Mendelson, Jerusalem, Israel N3OWJ/4X1GM
New word I coined 12/13/09, "Sub-Wikipedia" adj, describing knowledge or
understanding, as in he has a sub-wikipedia understanding of the situation.
i.e possessing less facts or information than can be found in the Wikipedia.
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Old April 15th 10, 08:53 PM posted to rec.radio.shortwave
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On Apr 15, 12:39*pm, "Geoffrey S. Mendelson"
wrote:

It's a very nice place to live, complete with good socialized medicince,
one of the most liberal democracies on the planet, reasonable rent,
almost no street crime, etc.


WHAT!?!?!? You mean the U.S. is an ally of a nation with socialized
medicine!?!? Fie fie on us! Oh the shame, the damnation, the
irony! ;-)

heh heh...

Bruce Jensen
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Old April 15th 10, 11:29 PM posted to rec.radio.shortwave
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Default Ultra Heavy BCB Dx'ing

Bob Dobbs wrote:
9kc wide in AM mode is the best I can manage.


For shortwave, 2.4 which is what most ham rigs deliver is too narrow,
4 is about the best and 6 is better if there is no adjacent channel
interference.

BCB AM works best with wider filters, depending upon what's close by.

I don't know how it is elsewhere, here I get a half a dozen or so BCB AM
stations, lots of SWBC (mostly on 40m) and the FM band has a station every
100kHz.

None of my HAM rigs have a sync-det, but a couple are stable enough on SSB to
accomplish the same effect. Only one of the SW portables has sync-det and it's
nice because it does DSB too on occasion when that mode is advantageous.


Is it really needed for broadcast band AM? I see very little if any fading
and can not remember it every being a problem.


I still don't know of any amateur rigs that tailor their coverage to BCB
although there are plenty that include it in the 30kc~30Mc spread.


I don't think there are any. It's not something the customers want and
ones sold in the US generally have extra front end antenuation for the
BCB.


They have to have the US amateur band plan restrictions superimposed
for type acceptance to be sold as an amateur HF transmitting device
in the USA (Usually deactivated by diode removal).


That's only for transmit. Very few countries restrict reception of anything
below 30mHz.


I use long outdoor omni antennas on all my amateur radios for AMBCB.
But I do have a tunable loop that works great with the SW portable.


I use a 20 meter long random wire with my r5000 and a 6 meter (high not
band) aluminum pole on my ham rigs. My SPR-4 works fine with the pole.

Geoff.

--
Geoffrey S. Mendelson, Jerusalem, Israel N3OWJ/4X1GM
New word I coined 12/13/09, "Sub-Wikipedia" adj, describing knowledge or
understanding, as in he has a sub-wikipedia understanding of the situation.
i.e possessing less facts or information than can be found in the Wikipedia.
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Old April 16th 10, 02:25 PM posted to rec.radio.shortwave
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Default Ultra Heavy BCB Dx'ing

Bob Dobbs wrote:
Geoffrey S. Mendelson wrote:

~~~

don't buy a SW, especially ham, receiver and expect it to perform
well on the AM BCB.


Why not?
I didn't initially buy any of my HAM rigs for use on AMBCB,
however a couple have turned out to perform very nicely there.
They're very stable (TCXO), have adjustable IF bandwidth and shift,
one of them has a convenient band scan to spot stations,
another actually has a spectrum scope to look at the band.
And even though that band is always full at night
it helps to see what's out there during the day.


The very best ram radio receivers have no coverage outside the ham
bands, where they are bandpass filtered.
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Old April 16th 10, 02:34 PM posted to rec.radio.shortwave
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Default Ultra Heavy BCB Dx'ing

Geoffrey S. Mendelson wrote:
Bob Dobbs wrote:
9kc wide in AM mode is the best I can manage.


For shortwave, 2.4 which is what most ham rigs deliver is too narrow,
4 is about the best and 6 is better if there is no adjacent channel
interference.

BCB AM works best with wider filters, depending upon what's close by.

I don't know how it is elsewhere, here I get a half a dozen or so BCB AM
stations, lots of SWBC (mostly on 40m) and the FM band has a station every
100kHz.

None of my HAM rigs have a sync-det, but a couple are stable enough on SSB to
accomplish the same effect. Only one of the SW portables has sync-det and it's
nice because it does DSB too on occasion when that mode is advantageous.


Is it really needed for broadcast band AM? I see very little if any fading
and can not remember it every being a problem.


I still don't know of any amateur rigs that tailor their coverage to BCB
although there are plenty that include it in the 30kc~30Mc spread.


I don't think there are any. It's not something the customers want and
ones sold in the US generally have extra front end antenuation for the
BCB.


They have to have the US amateur band plan restrictions superimposed
for type acceptance to be sold as an amateur HF transmitting device
in the USA (Usually deactivated by diode removal).


That's only for transmit. Very few countries restrict reception of anything
below 30mHz.


I use long outdoor omni antennas on all my amateur radios for AMBCB.
But I do have a tunable loop that works great with the SW portable.


I use a 20 meter long random wire with my r5000 and a 6 meter (high not
band) aluminum pole on my ham rigs. My SPR-4 works fine with the pole.

Geoff.

Really? Selective fading is a major issue here on mediumwave.
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Old April 16th 10, 03:51 PM posted to rec.radio.shortwave
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Default Ultra Heavy BCB Dx'ing

On Apr 16, 6:25*am, dave wrote:
Bob Dobbs wrote:
Geoffrey S. Mendelson wrote:


~~~


don't buy a SW, especially ham, receiver and expect it to perform
well on the AM BCB.


Why not?
I didn't initially buy any of my HAM rigs for use on AMBCB,
however a couple have turned out to perform very nicely there.
They're very stable (TCXO), have adjustable IF bandwidth and shift,
one of them has a convenient band scan to spot stations,
another actually has a spectrum scope to look at the band.
And even though that band is always full at night
it helps to see what's out there during the day.


The very best ram radio receivers have no coverage outside the ham
bands, where they are bandpass filtered.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


Does that mean your Elecraft?
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Old April 16th 10, 03:52 PM posted to rec.radio.shortwave
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Posts: 2,029
Default Ultra Heavy BCB Dx'ing

On Apr 16, 6:34*am, dave wrote:
Geoffrey S. Mendelson wrote:
Bob Dobbs wrote:
9kc wide in AM mode is the best I can manage.


For shortwave, 2.4 which is what most ham rigs deliver is too narrow,
4 is about the best and 6 is better if there is no adjacent channel
interference.


BCB AM works best with wider filters, depending upon what's close by.


I don't know how it is elsewhere, here I get a half a dozen or so BCB AM
stations, lots of SWBC (mostly on 40m) and the FM band has a station every
100kHz.


None of my HAM rigs have a sync-det, but a couple are stable enough on SSB to
accomplish the same effect. Only one of the SW portables has sync-det and it's
nice because it does DSB too on occasion when that mode is advantageous.


Is it really needed for broadcast band AM? I see very little if any fading
and can not remember it every being a problem.


I still don't know of any amateur rigs that tailor their coverage to BCB
although there are plenty that include it in the 30kc~30Mc spread.


I don't think there are any. It's not something the customers want and
ones sold in the US generally have extra front end antenuation for the
BCB.


They have to have the US amateur band plan restrictions superimposed
for type acceptance to be sold as an amateur HF transmitting device
in the USA (Usually deactivated by diode removal).


That's only for transmit. Very few countries restrict reception of anything
below 30mHz.


I use long outdoor omni antennas on all my amateur radios for AMBCB.
But I do have a tunable loop that works great with the SW portable.


I use a 20 meter long random wire with my r5000 and a 6 meter (high not
band) aluminum pole on my ham rigs. My SPR-4 works fine with the pole.


Geoff.


Really? *Selective fading is a major issue here on mediumwave.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


Yes, here too - ever since I can remember - not only for the nighttime
DX, but also for day signals from relatively local stations.


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