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  #31   Report Post  
Old July 27th 17, 12:57 AM posted to uk.radio.amateur,rec.radio.amateur.antenna
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Posts: 980
Default Full wave antennae on 137kHz?

Roger Hayter wrote on 7/26/2017 7:39 PM:
Brian Reay wrote:

On 27/07/2017 00:06, Roger Hayter wrote:
Brian Reay wrote:

On 26/07/2017 23:46, Roger Hayter wrote:
Custos Custodum wrote:

On Wed, 26 Jul 2017 21:16:02 +0100, Gareth's Downstairs Computer
wrote:

ITYM, "antennae"

It is "antennas" for the things connected to radios and "antennae"
for things connected to insects and arthopods even in the UK, not
just in the US, according to Collins English Dictionary.



Try a dictionary for grownups such as the OED and not one
targetted at disuptive children.

Your wish is my command. From OED3, March 2016:

antenna, n.
View as: Outline |Full entryKeywords: On |Off
Quotations: Show all |Hide all
Pronunciation: Brit. /an't?n?/, U.S. /æn't?n?/
Frequency (in current use):
Inflections: Pl. antennae, (esp. in sense 4) antennas.
Origin: A borrowing from Latin. Etymons: Latin antenna, antemna,
Italian antenna.
Etymology: classical Latin antenna, earlier antemna... (Show More)

4. A wire, rod, or other structure by which airborne radio waves are
transmitted or received, usually as part of a radio or television
transmission or receiving system; = aerial n. 3.

1902˜2013(Show quotations)

Interpreting that, it does bear out Gareth's theory that antennae is the
original plural but says that antennas is also used "especially" with
radio aerials. So the conclusion I draw is that both are correct but
that antennas is growing in popularity.


No, it confirms the converse.

You mean that antennas was original, but antennae is growing in
popularity????


Are you trying to usurp Evans as the village idiot?

Hint, there is no mention of 'growing popularity' of either- it is clear
they mean antennas is used for RF antennas.


It is really not my fault if you use the word converse when you don't
know what it means. The dictionary says that antennas is a second
variant 'especially' used for radio aerials, it certainly doesn't say it
is exclusive usage in this context. Growing popularity is from my own
observation of the literature, antennae is widely used in UK 1930s
publications.

And I do resent pompous ****s who can barely speak English calling *me*
an idiot.


You do realize this is a newsgroup, no? An amateur radio newsgroup at that.
You expect people like these to be respectful?

--

Rick C

  #32   Report Post  
Old July 27th 17, 12:59 AM posted to uk.radio.amateur,rec.radio.amateur.antenna
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Default Full wave antennae on 137kHz?

Gareth's Downstairs Computer wrote on 7/26/2017 4:17 PM:
On 26/07/2017 19:38, Ian Jackson wrote:
In message , Gareth's Downstairs Computer
writes



ITYM, "antennae"

No he doesn't.


Read the title thread to which you are both contributing.


Does your post belong in an entomology group?

--

Rick C
  #33   Report Post  
Old July 27th 17, 01:12 AM posted to uk.radio.amateur,rec.radio.amateur.antenna
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Default Full wave antennae on 137kHz?

rickman wrote:

Roger Hayter wrote on 7/26/2017 7:39 PM:

snip
It is really not my fault if you use the word converse when you don't
know what it means. The dictionary says that antennas is a second
variant 'especially' used for radio aerials, it certainly doesn't say it
is exclusive usage in this context. Growing popularity is from my own
observation of the literature, antennae is widely used in UK 1930s
publications.

And I do resent pompous ****s who can barely speak English calling *me*
an idiot.


You do realize this is a newsgroup, no? An amateur radio newsgroup at that.
You expect people like these to be respectful?


I'm an optimist living in a constant state of disappointment. But,
seriously, while Gareth is 70 years (and a major war with technical
cooperation on the allied side) too late to get rid of 'antennas', there
is also a respectable history of use of 'antennae' in a radio context,
albeit a dying usage.



--

Roger Hayter
  #34   Report Post  
Old July 27th 17, 01:12 AM posted to uk.radio.amateur,rec.radio.amateur.antenna
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Posts: 161
Default Full wave antennae on 137kHz?

rickman wrote:

Gareth's Downstairs Computer wrote on 7/26/2017 4:17 PM:
On 26/07/2017 19:38, Ian Jackson wrote:
In message , Gareth's Downstairs Computer
writes



ITYM, "antennae"

No he doesn't.


Read the title thread to which you are both contributing.


Does your post belong in an entomology group?


It would be equally at home in a technical history group. And even
here, if the OP were a teensy bit less confrontational.


--

Roger Hayter
  #35   Report Post  
Old July 27th 17, 07:38 AM posted to uk.radio.amateur,rec.radio.amateur.antenna
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First recorded activity by RadioBanter: May 2017
Posts: 15
Default Full wave antennae on 137kHz?


And I do resent pompous ****s who can barely speak English calling *me*
an idiot.



spot on OM ....




  #36   Report Post  
Old July 27th 17, 07:39 AM posted to uk.radio.amateur,rec.radio.amateur.antenna
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First recorded activity by RadioBanter: May 2017
Posts: 15
Default Full wave antennae on 137kHz?


You do realise this is a newsgroup, no? An amateur radio newsgroup at
that.
You expect people like these to be respectful?

don't be silly ....


  #37   Report Post  
Old July 27th 17, 07:46 AM posted to uk.radio.amateur,rec.radio.amateur.antenna
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Default Full wave antennae on 137kHz?


"Roger Hayter" wrote in message
...
Brian Reay wrote:

On 27/07/2017 00:06, Roger Hayter wrote:
Brian Reay wrote:

On 26/07/2017 23:46, Roger Hayter wrote:
Custos Custodum wrote:

On Wed, 26 Jul 2017 21:16:02 +0100, Gareth's Downstairs Computer
wrote:

ITYM, "antennae"

It is "antennas" for the things connected to radios and "antennae"
for things connected to insects and arthopods even in the UK, not
just in the US, according to Collins English Dictionary.



Try a dictionary for grownups such as the OED and not one
targetted at disuptive children.

Your wish is my command. From OED3, March 2016:

antenna, n.
View as: Outline |Full entryKeywords: On |Off
Quotations: Show all |Hide all
Pronunciation: Brit. /an't?n?/, U.S. /n't?n?/
Frequency (in current use):
Inflections: Pl. antennae, (esp. in sense 4) antennas.
Origin: A borrowing from Latin. Etymons: Latin antenna, antemna,
Italian antenna.
Etymology: classical Latin antenna, earlier antemna... (Show More)

4. A wire, rod, or other structure by which airborne radio waves
are
transmitted or received, usually as part of a radio or television
transmission or receiving system; = aerial n. 3.

1902~2013(Show quotations)

Interpreting that, it does bear out Gareth's theory that antennae is
the
original plural but says that antennas is also used "especially" with
radio aerials. So the conclusion I draw is that both are correct but
that antennas is growing in popularity.


No, it confirms the converse.

You mean that antennas was original, but antennae is growing in
popularity????


Are you trying to usurp Evans as the village idiot?

Hint, there is no mention of 'growing popularity' of either- it is clear
they mean antennas is used for RF antennas.


It is really not my fault if you use the word converse when you don't
know what it means. The dictionary says that antennas is a second
variant 'especially' used for radio aerials, it certainly doesn't say it
is exclusive usage in this context. Growing popularity is from my own
observation of the literature, antennae is widely used in UK 1930s
publications.

And I do resent pompous ****s who can barely speak English calling *me*
an idiot.

just use the term "Twig".....most hammy mens do ....


  #38   Report Post  
Old July 27th 17, 09:02 AM posted to uk.radio.amateur,rec.radio.amateur.antenna
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Default Full wave antennae on 137kHz?

On 27/07/2017 00:39, Roger Hayter wrote:
Brian Reay wrote:


Are you trying to usurp Evans as the village idiot?


Hint, there is no mention of 'growing popularity' of either- it is clear
they mean antennas is used for RF antennas.


It is really not my fault if you use the word converse when you don't
know what it means. The dictionary says that antennas is a second
variant 'especially' used for radio aerials, it certainly doesn't say it
is exclusive usage in this context. Growing popularity is from my own
observation of the literature, antennae is widely used in UK 1930s
publications.


In his depiction of the X-Gerate-equipped Heinkel III, R V Jones
labelled them as 'antennae'.

And I do resent pompous ****s who can barely speak English calling *me*
an idiot.


Nice burn.


--
Spike
  #39   Report Post  
Old July 27th 17, 09:26 AM posted to uk.radio.amateur,rec.radio.amateur.antenna
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First recorded activity by RadioBanter: Aug 2013
Posts: 379
Default Full wave antennae on 137kHz?

On 27/07/2017 00:39, Roger Hayter wrote:
Brian Reay wrote:

On 27/07/2017 00:06, Roger Hayter wrote:
Brian Reay wrote:

On 26/07/2017 23:46, Roger Hayter wrote:
Custos Custodum wrote:

On Wed, 26 Jul 2017 21:16:02 +0100, Gareth's Downstairs Computer
wrote:

ITYM, "antennae"

It is "antennas" for the things connected to radios and "antennae"
for things connected to insects and arthopods even in the UK, not
just in the US, according to Collins English Dictionary.



Try a dictionary for grownups such as the OED and not one
targetted at disuptive children.

Your wish is my command. From OED3, March 2016:

antenna, n.
View as: Outline |Full entryKeywords: On |Off
Quotations: Show all |Hide all
Pronunciation: Brit. /an't?n?/, U.S. /æn't?n?/
Frequency (in current use):
Inflections: Pl. antennae, (esp. in sense 4) antennas.
Origin: A borrowing from Latin. Etymons: Latin antenna, antemna,
Italian antenna.
Etymology: classical Latin antenna, earlier antemna... (Show More)

4. A wire, rod, or other structure by which airborne radio waves are
transmitted or received, usually as part of a radio or television
transmission or receiving system; = aerial n. 3.

1902˜2013(Show quotations)

Interpreting that, it does bear out Gareth's theory that antennae is the
original plural but says that antennas is also used "especially" with
radio aerials. So the conclusion I draw is that both are correct but
that antennas is growing in popularity.


No, it confirms the converse.

You mean that antennas was original, but antennae is growing in
popularity????


Are you trying to usurp Evans as the village idiot?

Hint, there is no mention of 'growing popularity' of either- it is clear
they mean antennas is used for RF antennas.


It is really not my fault if you use the word converse when you don't
know what it means. The dictionary says that antennas is a second
variant 'especially' used for radio aerials, it certainly doesn't say it
is exclusive usage in this context. Growing popularity is from my own
observation of the literature, antennae is widely used in UK 1930s
publications.

And I do resent pompous ****s who can barely speak English calling *me*
an idiot.





Oh dear, turning to fowl language hardly shows your command of English,
nor that you can conduct yourself in a civil manner.

Don't take your frustration out on others when you've been proved wrong,
that is exactly what your chum did and look where that ended up- him in
court being dressed down by a judge. He isn't the only one who can't
handle being shown to be in the wrong and has taken it too far.






--

Suspect someone is claiming a benefit under false pretences? Incapacity
Benefit or Personal Independence Payment when they don't need it? They
are depriving those in real need!

https://www.gov.uk/report-benefit-fraud
  #40   Report Post  
Old July 27th 17, 09:30 AM posted to uk.radio.amateur,rec.radio.amateur.antenna
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First recorded activity by RadioBanter: Aug 2013
Posts: 379
Default Full wave antennae on 137kHz?

On 27/07/2017 00:57, rickman wrote:
Roger Hayter wrote on 7/26/2017 7:39 PM:
Brian Reay wrote:

On 27/07/2017 00:06, Roger Hayter wrote:
Brian Reay wrote:

On 26/07/2017 23:46, Roger Hayter wrote:
Custos Custodum wrote:

On Wed, 26 Jul 2017 21:16:02 +0100, Gareth's Downstairs Computer
wrote:

ITYM, "antennae"

It is "antennas" for the things connected to radios and "antennae"
for things connected to insects and arthopods even in the UK, not
just in the US, according to Collins English Dictionary.



Try a dictionary for grownups such as the OED and not one
targetted at disuptive children.

Your wish is my command. From OED3, March 2016:

antenna, n.
View as: Outline |Full entryKeywords: On |Off
Quotations: Show all |Hide all
Pronunciation: Brit. /an't?n?/, U.S. /æn't?n?/
Frequency (in current use):
Inflections: Pl. antennae, (esp. in sense 4) antennas.
Origin: A borrowing from Latin. Etymons: Latin antenna, antemna,
Italian antenna.
Etymology: classical Latin antenna, earlier antemna... (Show More)

4. A wire, rod, or other structure by which airborne radio waves
are
transmitted or received, usually as part of a radio or television
transmission or receiving system; = aerial n. 3.

1902˜2013(Show quotations)

Interpreting that, it does bear out Gareth's theory that antennae
is the
original plural but says that antennas is also used "especially" with
radio aerials. So the conclusion I draw is that both are correct but
that antennas is growing in popularity.


No, it confirms the converse.

You mean that antennas was original, but antennae is growing in
popularity????


Are you trying to usurp Evans as the village idiot?

Hint, there is no mention of 'growing popularity' of either- it is clear
they mean antennas is used for RF antennas.


It is really not my fault if you use the word converse when you don't
know what it means. The dictionary says that antennas is a second
variant 'especially' used for radio aerials, it certainly doesn't say it
is exclusive usage in this context. Growing popularity is from my own
observation of the literature, antennae is widely used in UK 1930s
publications.

And I do resent pompous ****s who can barely speak English calling *me*
an idiot.


You do realize this is a newsgroup, no? An amateur radio newsgroup at
that. You expect people like these to be respectful?


Roger is one of Evans' chums, that explains his behaviour and language.

It seems he may be trying to usurp Evans as the village idiot.

--

Suspect someone is claiming a benefit under false pretences? Incapacity
Benefit or Personal Independence Payment when they don't need it? They
are depriving those in real need!

https://www.gov.uk/report-benefit-fraud


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