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Old February 16th 07, 12:19 AM posted to rec.radio.amateur.policy
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On Feb 15, 11:06�am, Dave Heil wrote:
wrote:
On Feb 15, 5:47 am, wrote:
On Feb 14, 11:36?pm, Dave Heil wrote:


In amateur radio, it is the biggest potato there is, here in the U.S.
Actually, Dave, I think the ARRL may be the largest amateur radio
organization in the world, or at least the largest national amateur
radio
organization.


According towww.AH0A.org, JARL membership is now well under
100,000. What other amateur radio organization even comes close
to 100,000 members?


For now yup prolly but there's some cryptic chatter in the Back
Channel about Sweetums' French cousin Foghorn LePutz pulling together
a huge organization of Eurohams which will publish it's annual budget
and won't have "Members only" pages in it's website.


I can see it now: *There'll be a massive, multi-cultural EU-Ham
organization, made up of radio amateurs from all EU countries. *


Even if that happened, it would not be a national organization unless
the EU became one nation.

It will
have an open web site, no annual dues and will give away its
publications. *Publications will be produced in all of the languages of
the EU member states.


All of this will be take place after the ten-year discussion period.


HAW!!

--

Actually we've had a multinational amateur radio organization since
1925 - the IARU. But it's not really the same thing as RSGB, JARL,
ARRL, RAC, etc., because an individual cannot simply join IARU.

The question of who founded the IARU is left as an exercise for the
reader.

--

btw, there have been a couple of national amateur radio organizations
besides ARRL down through the decades. But except for the ARRL, they
simply disappeared after a few years.

For example, the restructuring of 1951, which (among other things)
gave us the modern Amateur Extra license, was strongly influenced by
two relatively small amateur radio organizations who felt the old
Class A requirements weren't high enough. (The creation of the Extra
class was *opposed* by ARRL, in fact.) Those two organizations are
long gone, but the skeleton of the license structure remains.

73 de Jim, N2EY


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Old February 16th 07, 12:19 AM posted to rec.radio.amateur.policy
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Default Largest Amateur Radio Organization?

On Feb 15, 8:06�am, Dave Heil wrote:
wrote:
On Feb 15, 5:47 am, wrote:
On Feb 14, 11:36?pm, Dave Heil wrote:


I can see it now: *There'll be a massive, multi-cultural EU-Ham
organization, made up of radio amateurs from all EU countries. *It will
have an open web site, no annual dues and will give away its
publications. *Publications will be produced in all of the languages of
the EU member states.


Where have you been? On some secret State Department
"assignment?" Don't you know where the International
Amateur Radio Union has had its website? Don't you know
that anyone can download IARU documents for free?

Don't you know that the IARU is an international union,
not just of European countries? Why are you so ignorant?
Have you been working Frenchmen out of band lately?

LA

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Old February 16th 07, 01:22 AM posted to rec.radio.amateur.policy
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Default Largest Amateur Radio Organization?

wrote:
On Feb 15, 8:06�am, Dave Heil wrote:
wrote:
On Feb 15, 5:47 am, wrote:
On Feb 14, 11:36?pm, Dave Heil wrote:


I can see it now: �There'll be a massive, multi-cultural EU-Ham
organization, made up of radio amateurs from all EU countries. �It will
have an open web site, no annual dues and will give away its
publications. �Publications will be produced in all of the languages of
the EU member states.


Where have you been?


Europe, Africa and right here.

On some secret State Department
"assignment?"


None of my assignments were secret, Leonard. They made "State" magazine
and all of the amateur radio mags.

Don't you know where the International
Amateur Radio Union has had its website? Don't you know
that anyone can download IARU documents for free?


Okay, I want to join the IARU. Now where can I buy the latest IARU
antenna handbook and the big IARU operating manual.

Leonard, old boy, I'll venture a guess that I have much more knowledge
of the IARU and have had much more direct contact with the IARU than you.

Don't you know that the IARU is an international union,
not just of European countries?


I wrote about a pan-EU (not European) organization. Don't you get
anything right?

Why are you so ignorant?


I've read your post. I've thus looked at the very source of ignorance.

Have you been working Frenchmen out of band lately?


Have you worked anyone on any amateur band lately?

LA

ti dah

Dave K8MN

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Old February 16th 07, 05:29 AM posted to rec.radio.amateur.policy
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From: on 15 Feb 2007 15:09:25 -0800

wrote:
On Feb 14, 11:36?pm, Dave Heil wrote:



According to www.AH0A.org, JARL membership is now well under
100,000. What other amateur radio organization even comes close
to 100,000 members?


I hedged my bet, thinking of JARL.


Their membership has been cut almost in half in the past ten years. It
follows closely the numerical decline of Japanese amateur radio in
general.


Tsk, tsk, NOT 100% correct according to www.ah0a.org.

Japanese amateur radio licenses were tabled there yearly,
indicating a CONSTANT annual growth of 10.19% in 1978
(total licenses 686,301) dropping slowly to 0.724%
annual growth in 2006 (total licenses 3,192,744).

In only 28 years that tabulations shows an increase of
2,506,443. If that were averaged over 28 years it
represents a growth of about 89,516 licensees per year.
If that average growth is divided by 365 it shows an
increase of about 245 new licenses per day.

That cannot possibly be taken as a "general decline" in
Japanese amateur radio.


I remember how, ten years or so ago, the large numbers of Japanese
amateurs was touted as proof of the need for a nocodetest license with
HF privileges. Japan was held up as the poster country for code test
reduction/elimination.


"Touted?" Is this a race track? :-)

Let's see...www.hamdata.com shows US numbers on 15 Feb 07
as 721,956 total licenses. Since 10,350 of those are
club calls, the total of Individual licensees would be
711,606. Compare that to over 3 million Japanese
licensees for last year, plus a continuing GROWTH.

Hamdata.com numbers indicate the last 12 months as
having and increase of NEW licensees equal to 22,350.
However, those same 12 months show Expirations (or,
in their polite euphemism, 'no longer licensed') of
28,781. That works out to about 61 NEW licensees
per day but with about 78 per day Expirations. The
NEGATIVE growth is then about 17 per day from a
negative delta of 6,431 per year. US licensee totals
peaked 3 1/2 years ago, has been on a steady decline
since.


Judging by the number of stations, the USA has regained the lead as
the country with the most licensed amateurs.


You are just speculating and have NO proof either way.

While Japanese operator
license numbers are higher, it should be remembered that those
licenses never expire.


Neither does the imagination of morsemen expire in
their illogical conclusions.


The number of Japanese operator licenses shown on the AH0A website is
really an indication of how many amateurs have been licensed in that
country since 1952, not how many are currently licensed.


Strange, but I was just at www.ah0a.org and that tabulation
begins at 1959, NOT 1952! Tsk, tsk, that is NOT
"100% accuracy!"

So, are you saying that 2,506,443 Japanese radio amateurs
have died and their totals remain at only 686,301 NOW?
That seems to be your IMPLICATION.

Fact: World War II (in the Pacific) ended in 1945 and
the Japanese surrendered. Really. It was in all the
papers. Try to get out more. We don't need to kill off
any Japanese now.

LA

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Old February 16th 07, 05:30 AM posted to rec.radio.amateur.policy
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From: on 15 Feb 2007 15:09:25 -0800

wrote:
On Feb 14, 11:36?pm, Dave Heil wrote:



According to www.AH0A.org, JARL membership is now well under
100,000. What other amateur radio organization even comes close
to 100,000 members?


I hedged my bet, thinking of JARL.


Their membership has been cut almost in half in the past ten years. It
follows closely the numerical decline of Japanese amateur radio in
general.


Tsk, tsk, NOT 100% correct according to www.ah0a.org.

Japanese amateur radio licenses were tabled there yearly,
indicating a CONSTANT annual growth of 10.19% in 1978
(total licenses 686,301) dropping slowly to 0.724%
annual growth in 2006 (total licenses 3,192,744).

In only 28 years that tabulations shows an increase of
2,506,443. If that were averaged over 28 years it
represents a growth of about 89,516 licensees per year.
If that average growth is divided by 365 it shows an
increase of about 245 new licenses per day.

That cannot possibly be taken as a "general decline" in
Japanese amateur radio.


I remember how, ten years or so ago, the large numbers of Japanese
amateurs was touted as proof of the need for a nocodetest license with
HF privileges. Japan was held up as the poster country for code test
reduction/elimination.


"Touted?" Is this a race track? :-)

Let's see...www.hamdata.com shows US numbers on 15 Feb 07
as 721,956 total licenses. Since 10,350 of those are
club calls, the total of Individual licensees would be
711,606. Compare that to over 3 million Japanese
licensees for last year, plus a continuing GROWTH.

Hamdata.com numbers indicate the last 12 months as
having and increase of NEW licensees equal to 22,350.
However, those same 12 months show Expirations (or,
in their polite euphemism, 'no longer licensed') of
28,781. That works out to about 61 NEW licensees
per day but with about 78 per day Expirations. The
NEGATIVE growth is then about 17 per day from a
negative delta of 6,431 per year. US licensee totals
peaked 3 1/2 years ago, has been on a steady decline
since.


Judging by the number of stations, the USA has regained the lead as
the country with the most licensed amateurs.


You are just speculating and have NO proof either way.

While Japanese operator
license numbers are higher, it should be remembered that those
licenses never expire.


Neither does the imagination of morsemen expire in
their illogical conclusions.


The number of Japanese operator licenses shown on the AH0A website is
really an indication of how many amateurs have been licensed in that
country since 1952, not how many are currently licensed.


Strange, but I was just at www.ah0a.org and that tabulation
begins at 1959, NOT 1952! Tsk, tsk, that is NOT
"100% accuracy!"

So, are you saying that 2,506,443 Japanese radio amateurs
have died and their totals remain at only 686,301 NOW?
That seems to be your IMPLICATION.

Fact: World War II (in the Pacific) ended in 1945 and
the Japanese surrendered. Really. It was in all the
papers. Try to get out more. We don't need to kill off
any Japanese now.

LA



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