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  #1041   Report Post  
Old October 2nd 06, 01:25 AM posted to alt.radio.scanner,rec.radio.amateur.antenna,rec.radio.amateur.policy,rec.radio.scanner,rec.radio.swap
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Default So, Which reader has actually saved a life or lives using "CW" on Ham Bands?


Slow Code wrote:
wrote in
ups.com:


Slow Code wrote:

Lenny, just to help you feel better about morse code, if I ever hear
you are dying and in need of help, I will use CW to get you help. Then
you'll know before you die a ham used morse code to save a life and you
can rest in peace over CW.

SC


Slow, thats IMPOSSIBLE! If you use CW then how can Len die?



Lenny's life was saved. The shock he got at being told he'd been saved by
CW resulted in him having a heart attack, and that killed him.

SC


Count me dead, too. I never would have believed it.


  #1042   Report Post  
Old October 2nd 06, 01:29 AM posted to alt.radio.scanner,rec.radio.amateur.antenna,rec.radio.amateur.policy,rec.radio.scanner,rec.radio.swap
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Default So, Which reader has actually saved a life or lives using "CW" on Ham Bands?


Slow Code wrote:

Lenny's life was saved. The shock he got at being told he'd been saved by
CW resulted in him having a heart attack, and that killed him.


Contrary to Blow Code's fantasies, "the reports of my demise have
been exaggerated." [more or less a quote of Samuel Clemens]

I've never had a heart attack, have never died. Now quit imaginging
things that haven't happened. If you keep on, the new moderating
team may make you sit in the corner.




  #1043   Report Post  
Old October 2nd 06, 01:32 AM posted to rec.radio.swap,rec.radio.amateur.policy,rec.radio.amateur.antenna
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Default So, Which reader has actually saved a life or lives using "CW" on Ham Bands?


Dave Oldridge wrote:
wrote in
news
On Fri, 29 Sep 2006 01:46:41 GMT, Dave Oldridge
wrote:

Slow Code wrote in news:SPYSg.4010$o71.3724
:

" wrote in
oups.com:

Please, don't all jump in at once with all the unproven
bragging and dozens of local weekly newspaper clippings.

Let's hear it for the mode that saved the Titanic survivors
in 1912...

Don't know about whether it saved any lives or not, but I once took a
very important NOTAM (Notice to Airman) on CW from a guy in the
Aleutians in the days following the 1964 quake and put it on the
proper teletype circuits for him.

His airport's altitude was changing so that charts and other info were
inaccurate.

on Hand bam?
http://kb9rqz.blogspot.com/

Yep...on 80m. It was the only communications he had at the time.


--
Dave Oldridge+
ICQ 1800667


I've been thinking about this. I've taken classes in land surveying
and used to shoot levels at the COE. Other than the earth shaking, how
did he determine what the correct elevation was?

  #1044   Report Post  
Old October 2nd 06, 01:37 AM posted to alt.radio.scanner,rec.radio.amateur.antenna,rec.radio.amateur.policy,rec.radio.scanner,rec.radio.swap
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Default So, Which reader has actually saved a life or lives using "CW" on Ham Bands?


wrote:
wrote:
wrote:
wrote:
wrote:
From:
on Fri, Sep 29 2006 9:00 pm

Correction... that's "9 -dash- 1 -dash- 1." Robesin says so.


then it MUST be worng BB you should know that by now


It's come full circle. ;^)


Har! :-) The robeswine spawned the worm ouroborous! :-)


What is that?

  #1045   Report Post  
Old October 2nd 06, 01:47 AM posted to rec.radio.swap,rec.radio.amateur.policy,rec.radio.amateur.antenna
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First recorded activity by RadioBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 1,554
Default So, Which reader has actually saved a life or lives using "CW" on Ham Bands?


Dave Oldridge wrote:
" wrote in
ups.com:

Dave Oldridge wrote:
Slow Code wrote in news:SPYSg.4010$o71.3724
@newsread3.news.pas.earthlink.net:

" wrote in
oups.com:

Please, don't all jump in at once with all the unproven
bragging and dozens of local weekly newspaper clippings.

Let's hear it for the mode that saved the Titanic survivors
in 1912...

Don't know about whether it saved any lives or not, but I once took a
very important NOTAM (Notice to Airman) on CW from a guy in the
Aleutians in the days following the 1964 quake and put it on the
proper teletype circuits for him.

His airport's altitude was changing so that charts and other info
were inaccurate.


Dave, that sounds very suspicious considering my ground school
instructor's 1962 display of a then-old Santa Barbara, CA,
half-hour TTY Wx report (then required by Commerce Dept.).
SBA (ID of Santa Barbara), like all other weather stations at
airports, were required to post their local Wx and airport
conditions every half hour. SBA is on the Pacific coast and
subject to rapid variations of weather. If weather changes more
rapidly than that, weather stations were required to post extra
in-between-scheduled-times reports.

One day, after having fog entering and leaving SBA often, the
operator of the TTY sent: "THE FOG SHE COMES IN THE FOG
SHE GOES OUT." :-)

The ground school class at VNY was presented with a
glassine-protected TTY copy of the Wx message that must
have been old at that time (the cheap TTY paper was
already turning yellow). Got a good laugh from the class.


This was NOT weather. This was seismic.


Other geologic events are passed via WX circuits besides earthquakes.
For example, ash plumes as detected by wx satellie observations.
NOTAMS are in the WX circuits.

The runway was rising in spurts
sometimes as much as 3 feet in an hour. And, in that era all the comms
were microwave and had been knocked out by the big quake. 80m was all he
had.


Fair enough.

In 1964 (which is 42 years ago), the weather stations had their
own network over leased telephone lines. At least in the 48
contiguous states. Whether or not Alaska was tied in with
manual telegraphy (radio or wirelines) I can't confirm...nor do I
think it important since I know it was NOT via amateur bands.


At that time Alaska was tied into the networks by microwave. When the
quake shifted towers, we lost it all.

NOTAMs take many shapes but back 40+ years ago, the
FAA handled them and saw to their distribution at airports.
Most were press-printed but some current ones were sent
by TTY. That was in times before NOAA.


Yes, I know. I was working at Kimberly Aeradio in BC at the time of the
quake. It was violent enough to leave a small mark on my barograph, even
at that distance. The guys in Edmonton lost all circuits to Alaska and
in short order we knew that we had a HUGE communications emergency on our
hands (not to mention a real disaster).

At least I was in a position to put the information on the proper
teletype circuits addressed to the proper authorities.


--
Dave Oldridge+
ICQ 1800667




  #1047   Report Post  
Old October 2nd 06, 01:54 AM posted to rec.radio.swap,rec.radio.amateur.policy,rec.radio.amateur.antenna
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First recorded activity by RadioBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 1,554
Default So, Which reader has actually saved a life or lives using "CW" on Ham Bands?


Dave Oldridge wrote:
wrote in
oups.com:


Dave Oldridge wrote:
Slow Code wrote in news:SPYSg.4010$o71.3724
@newsread3.news.pas.earthlink.net:

" wrote in
oups.com:

Please, don't all jump in at once with all the unproven
bragging and dozens of local weekly newspaper clippings.

Let's hear it for the mode that saved the Titanic survivors
in 1912...

Don't know about whether it saved any lives or not, but I once took a
very important NOTAM (Notice to Airman) on CW from a guy in the
Aleutians in the days following the 1964 quake and put it on the
proper teletype circuits for him.

His airport's altitude was changing so that charts and other info
were inaccurate.

--
Dave Oldridge+
ICQ 1800667


PADK?


I don't remember now. Those were interesting days. And that kind of
emergency, while it can still happen, would be mitigated today by the
fact of satellite telephones, GPS and so forth that don't depend on local
power or microwave comms. Indeed, cell phones would probably have held
up in most areas if the towers were halfway decently designed and
powered....


BLASPHEMY!!!

CW on 80M still rules during EMCOMMS!

;^)

It was all the microwave dishes on towers that moved a tad that made it a
real communications emergency.


Gyro/Gimbal mounted dishes?

If I were to have to deal with one like
that today, I'd probably vote for using some digital mode, such as PSK31
or Olivia to move the traffic. But all we had back then was 850 shift
RTTY and not very much of that. It was another two years before I got
mine going (170 shift by then already!).

--
Dave Oldridge+
ICQ 1800667


I think RTTY is cool, but I won't force a RTTY practical exam on anyone.

  #1049   Report Post  
Old October 2nd 06, 07:00 PM posted to rec.radio.swap,rec.radio.amateur.policy,rec.radio.amateur.antenna
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First recorded activity by RadioBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 234
Default So, Which reader has actually saved a life or lives using "CW" on Ham Bands?

wrote in news:1159749149.386279.201030
@m73g2000cwd.googlegroups.com:


Dave Oldridge wrote:
wrote in
news
On Fri, 29 Sep 2006 01:46:41 GMT, Dave Oldridge
wrote:

Slow Code wrote in news:SPYSg.4010$o71.3724
:

" wrote in
oups.com:

Please, don't all jump in at once with all the unproven
bragging and dozens of local weekly newspaper clippings.

Let's hear it for the mode that saved the Titanic survivors
in 1912...

Don't know about whether it saved any lives or not, but I once took

a
very important NOTAM (Notice to Airman) on CW from a guy in the
Aleutians in the days following the 1964 quake and put it on the
proper teletype circuits for him.

His airport's altitude was changing so that charts and other info

were
inaccurate.
on Hand bam?
http://kb9rqz.blogspot.com/

Yep...on 80m. It was the only communications he had at the time.


--
Dave Oldridge+
ICQ 1800667


I've been thinking about this. I've taken classes in land surveying
and used to shoot levels at the COE. Other than the earth shaking, how
did he determine what the correct elevation was?


He didn't say....but at three feet per hour with the ocean nearby it
wouldn't be that hard to tell. And that was the point of his notice. He
COULDN'T determine it. But he knew the published value was wrong, which
also meant that all he could give arriving aircraft was a guess.


--
Dave Oldridge+
ICQ 1800667
  #1050   Report Post  
Old October 2nd 06, 07:02 PM posted to rec.radio.swap,rec.radio.amateur.policy,rec.radio.amateur.antenna
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by RadioBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 234
Default So, Which reader has actually saved a life or lives using "CW" on Ham Bands?

wrote in
ups.com:


Dave Oldridge wrote:
" wrote in
ups.com:

Dave Oldridge wrote:
Slow Code wrote in news:SPYSg.4010$o71.3724
@newsread3.news.pas.earthlink.net:

" wrote in
oups.com:

Please, don't all jump in at once with all the unproven
bragging and dozens of local weekly newspaper clippings.

Let's hear it for the mode that saved the Titanic survivors
in 1912...

Don't know about whether it saved any lives or not, but I once
took a very important NOTAM (Notice to Airman) on CW from a guy in
the Aleutians in the days following the 1964 quake and put it on
the proper teletype circuits for him.

His airport's altitude was changing so that charts and other info
were inaccurate.

Dave, that sounds very suspicious considering my ground school
instructor's 1962 display of a then-old Santa Barbara, CA,
half-hour TTY Wx report (then required by Commerce Dept.).
SBA (ID of Santa Barbara), like all other weather stations at
airports, were required to post their local Wx and airport
conditions every half hour. SBA is on the Pacific coast and
subject to rapid variations of weather. If weather changes more
rapidly than that, weather stations were required to post extra
in-between-scheduled-times reports.

One day, after having fog entering and leaving SBA often, the
operator of the TTY sent: "THE FOG SHE COMES IN THE FOG
SHE GOES OUT." :-)

The ground school class at VNY was presented with a
glassine-protected TTY copy of the Wx message that must
have been old at that time (the cheap TTY paper was
already turning yellow). Got a good laugh from the class.


This was NOT weather. This was seismic.


Other geologic events are passed via WX circuits besides earthquakes.
For example, ash plumes as detected by wx satellie observations.
NOTAMS are in the WX circuits.


True, although I did not put this on a weather circuit, but on the air
traffic control teletype network. We had both, actually.

--
Dave Oldridge+
ICQ 1800667


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