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Old July 13th 09, 11:19 AM posted to rec.radio.scanner
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Posts: 14
Default What is the best handheld scanner on the market today?

On Mon, 13 Jul 2009 05:08:54 -0500, Jack Newhouse
wrote:

On Fri, 10 Jul 2009 07:16:29 -0700, Evan Platt
wrote:

On Thu, 09 Jul 2009 22:19:20 -0500, Jack Newhouse
wrote:

We just got radio, television, and computers here in
Rushlimbaughville, MO this year. So I have no clue as to what trunking
can do.
http://www.city-data.com/city/Cape-G...-Missouri.html


All that means to me is two elephants using their trunks to wrestle
each other.

Can anyone find a site that will tell you whether there is any
trunking around here, or in Southern illinois, or Northwestern
Kentucky and Tennessee?


Illinois:
http://www.radioreference.com/apps/db/?stid=17

Kentucky:
http://www.radioreference.com/apps/db/?stid=21

Tennessee:
http://www.radioreference.com/apps/db/?stid=47


OK as I'm reading right now, I notice that the AOR has a frequency
range from 500K to 3GHZ
The Uniden goes from 25MHZ to 3Ghz

Does that mean that I can use the AOR scanner to pick up shortwave
stations around the world from 500khz on up to 30mhz, and the Uniden
can't? Also WWV at 5,10,15 mhz.

Shortwave is far more important to me in this area than is a trunking
ability.

Thanks


I just completed the questionnaire asking what type of scanning I do,
and how far out do I want to hear.

The page responded that since our area is still in the dark ages, a
basic scanner would suffice for all my funky needs! So I'm leaning
toward the AOR scanner with short wave capability and no trunking.

View and Compare Your Scanner Options
Your Scanner Options
Print This Page
Step 1. Important Notes About the Selected State and Counties
Step 2. How Scanners Differ
Step 3. View and Compare Your Scanner Options
Step 1. Important Notes About the Selected State and Counties
Modify Criteria
Counties
Jackson County, Illinois - 1*
Union County, Illinois - 1*
Alexander County, Illinois - 1*
Pulaski County, Illinois - 1*
Bollinger County, Missouri - 1*
Cape Girardeau County, Missouri - 1*
Scott County, Missouri - 1*
Perry County, Missouri - 1*
Mississippi County, Missouri - 1*
Scanner Usage

* Police / Fire / EMS


* Custom Programming Level
Disclaimer
Important Notes about Illinois:

The Illinois State Police and many other agencies have switched to the
statewide StarCom21 digital trunked radio system. The system operates
on the 700 and 800 MHz. bands and can be monitored with several models
of digital police scanners

In the Chicago area, the Cook County Sheriff uses an encrypted digital
Motorola Type II trunked radio system although some operations are
unencrypted. Chicago Police use an analog UHF repeater system that can
be monitored on a basic police scanner. The Chicago Fire Department
uses several analog VHF and UHF channels that can be monitored with a
basic police scanner but will transition to a digital UHF radio system
that would require a digital police scanner.

Suburban counties use a variety of radio system types. Will County and
Lake County use EDACS trunking systems, DuPage County uses non-trunked
800 MHz. channels, and DeKalb, Kane and McHenry Counties use analog
VHF channels. McHenry County will transition to a StarCom21 system
soon however so a digital police scanner will be needed.

In the suburbs most agencies use UHF or VHF analog systems. Some 800
MHz. analog and digital systems are in use in the far Northwest
suburbs (Arlington Hts., Schaumburg, Palatine etc.)

Downstate some areas use StarCom21, including McLean, St. Clair and
Madison Counties. Champaign County uses a digital trunked radio system
that uses some encryption. Each of these require a digital police
scanner. Other locations use mostly VHF channels and some UHF channels
that can be heard on a basic police scanner.
Important Notes about Missouri:

The vast majority of public safety radio communications in the State
of Missouri can be monitored on a basic police scanner. The Highway
Patrol operates mostly on VHF, along with most other state agencies.
Most counties and towns use VHF, some are on UHF and a few operate 800
MHz. trunking systems. While neighboring states are building large
scale digital systems this remains but a dream in Missouri.

See the RadioReference site for more information: RadioReference.com
Important Notes about Jackson County:

A basic police scanner will work for all county and local Police, Fire
and Ambulance radio communications in Jackson County, Illinois,
including Carbondale and Murphysboro.

To monitor the Illinois State Police and other state agencies a
digital trunking scanner radio is needed as they operate on the
StarCom21 APCO25 digital trunked system.

To view more information on this county please see the following
links:

CARMA Profile

RadioReference
Important Notes about Union County:

A basic police scanner will work for all county and local Police, Fire
and Ambulance radio communications in Union County, Illinois,
including Anna and Jonesboro.

To monitor the Illinois State Police and other state agencies a
digital trunking scanner radio is needed as they operate on the
StarCom21 APCO25 digital trunked system.

To view more information on this county please see the following
links:

CARMA Profile

RadioReference
Important Notes about Alexander County:

A basic police scanner will work for all county and local Police, Fire
and Ambulance radio communications in Alexander County, Illinois,
including Cairo.

To monitor the Illinois State Police and other state agencies a
digital trunking scanner radio is needed as they operate on the
StarCom21 APCO25 digital trunked system.

To view more information on this county please see the following
links:

CARMA Profile

RadioReference
Important Notes about Pulaski County:

A basic police scanner will work for all county and local Police, Fire
and Ambulance radio communications in Pulaski County, Illinois,
including Ullin and Mounds.

To monitor the Illinois State Police and other state agencies a
digital trunking scanner radio is needed as they operate on the
StarCom21 APCO25 digital trunked system.

To view more information on this county please see the following
links:

CARMA Profile

RadioReference
Important Notes about Bollinger County:

A basic police scanner will allow you to monitor Bollinger County
Missouri, including Marble Hill. Most operations are on VHF or UHF
conventional systems. Most Fire and other local operations can be
monitored with a basic scanner.

To monitor the Missouri Highway Patrol and other state agencies a
basic police scanner can be used as they operate mostly on various VHF
and UHF conventional channels.

To view more information on this county please see the following
links:

Missouri Highway Patrol and other State operations at RadioReference

RadioReference Info Page
Important Notes about Cape Girardeau County:

A basic police scanner will allow you to monitor Cape Girardeau County
Missouri, including the city of Cape Girardeau. Most operations are on
VHF or UHF conventional systems. Most Fire and other local operations
can be monitored with a basic scanner.

To monitor the Missouri Highway Patrol and other state agencies a
basic police scanner can be used as they operate mostly on various VHF
and UHF conventional channels.

To view more information on this county please see the following
links:

Missouri Highway Patrol and other State operations at RadioReference

RadioReference Info Page
Important Notes about Scott County:

A basic police scanner will allow you to monitor Scott County
Missouri, including Benton. Most operations are on VHF or UHF
conventional systems. Most Fire and other local operations can be
monitored with a basic scanner.

To monitor the Missouri Highway Patrol and other state agencies a
basic police scanner can be used as they operate mostly on various VHF
and UHF conventional channels.

To view more information on this county please see the following
links:

Missouri Highway Patrol and other State operations at RadioReference

RadioReference Info Page
Important Notes about Perry County:

A basic police scanner will allow you to monitor Perry County
Missouri, including Perryville. Most operations are on VHF or UHF
conventional systems. Most Fire and other local operations can be
monitored with a basic scanner.

To monitor the Missouri Highway Patrol and other state agencies a
basic police scanner can be used as they operate mostly on various VHF
and UHF conventional channels.

To view more information on this county please see the following
links:

Missouri Highway Patrol and other State operations at RadioReference

RadioReference Info Page
Important Notes about Mississippi County:

A basic police scanner will allow you to monitor Mississippi County
Missouri, including Charleston. Most operations are on VHF or UHF
conventional systems. Most Fire and other local operations can be
monitored with a basic scanner.

To monitor the Missouri Highway Patrol and other state agencies a
basic police scanner can be used as they operate mostly on various VHF
and UHF conventional channels.


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Old July 13th 09, 05:15 PM posted to rec.radio.scanner
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First recorded activity by RadioBanter: Jun 2009
Posts: 14
Default What is the best handheld scanner on the market today?

On Mon, 13 Jul 2009 06:47:06 -0700, Evan Platt
wrote:

On Mon, 13 Jul 2009 05:08:54 -0500, Jack Newhouse
wrote:

OK as I'm reading right now, I notice that the AOR has a frequency
range from 500K to 3GHZ
The Uniden goes from 25MHZ to 3Ghz

Does that mean that I can use the AOR scanner to pick up shortwave
stations around the world from 500khz on up to 30mhz, and the Uniden
can't? Also WWV at 5,10,15 mhz.

Shortwave is far more important to me in this area than is a trunking
ability.


Yes, that's correct. I'd suggest if there's ANYTHING at all in the
area that's trunked or digital, go with a digital scanner, and get an
inexpensive shortwave receiver.


You make a good point. for a minute there, I just loved the idea of
having one radio that picks up everything but trunking.

I do have two Sony 2010's that are portable and work fine. I have a
Grundig YB400 radio that works well also. Then I also have a Degen SW
radio that is very small and gets outstanding reception.

So if I get the top Uniden, I will be able to pick up agencies when I
travel to larger cities like St. Louis, Chicago, Memphis, or some
other place. As my father used to tell me about carrying guns and
knives to school when I was a teenager: "Son, it is better to have
them in your gym bag, and not need them; than to need them one time
and not have them."

So now that I'm settling on the Rolls Royce of Unidens, it become a
question of finding where I can get it the cheapest. :-)
  #13   Report Post  
Old July 13th 09, 05:38 PM posted to rec.radio.scanner
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First recorded activity by RadioBanter: Jun 2009
Posts: 14
Default What is the best handheld scanner on the market today?

On Fri, 10 Jul 2009 15:04:47 +0000 (UTC), Golan Klinger
wrote:

The Other Guy wrote:

But none of their radios can trunk.


You don't need a trunk tracking scanner to monitor and follow trunked
traffic. Just set the used range of frequencies into a bank and let the
scanner do what it does. While a trunk tracker makes things easier, it
isn't essential.


Do you mean punch in all of the channels one at a time on the same
bank?

Or is there some way to input the entire range of trunked channels
with one or two entries?
  #14   Report Post  
Old July 18th 09, 12:19 PM posted to rec.radio.scanner
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First recorded activity by RadioBanter: Jul 2008
Posts: 10
Default What is the best handheld scanner on the market today?

My GRE runs rings around the Uniden. Unidens are more easily desensed by
adjacent channel interference. Go with GRE. Audio also sounds much
better and clearer.

The Other Guy wrote:
On Thu, 09 Jul 2009 02:01:43 -0500, Jack Newhouse
wrote:


What would you reccommend for an excellent new handheld scanner?


Uniden BCD396XT, without a doubt.




To reply by email, lose the Ks...

  #15   Report Post  
Old July 18th 09, 04:04 PM posted to rec.radio.scanner
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First recorded activity by RadioBanter: Jul 2009
Posts: 6
Default What is the best handheld scanner on the market today?

Usenet User wrote:

My GRE runs rings around the Uniden.


Perhaps you could provide a model number and a link to some information
about your particular scanner? That might be helpful.

--
Golan Klinger
Dark is the suede that mows like a harvest.


  #16   Report Post  
Old July 20th 09, 12:55 AM posted to rec.radio.scanner
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First recorded activity by RadioBanter: Jul 2008
Posts: 10
Default What is the best handheld scanner on the market today?

Sorry, PSR500 portable and PSR600 desktop. Previously had the Uniden
996. Terrible digital trunking scanner. GRE have both been great and
audio is crisp and clear.

Golan Klinger wrote:
Usenet User wrote:

My GRE runs rings around the Uniden.


Perhaps you could provide a model number and a link to some information
about your particular scanner? That might be helpful.

  #17   Report Post  
Old August 17th 09, 11:17 PM posted to rec.radio.scanner
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First recorded activity by RadioBanter: Jun 2009
Posts: 14
Default What is the best handheld scanner on the market today?

On Sun, 19 Jul 2009 19:55:44 -0400, Usenet User
wrote:

Sorry, PSR500 portable and PSR600 desktop. Previously had the Uniden
996. Terrible digital trunking scanner. GRE have both been great and
audio is crisp and clear.

Golan Klinger wrote:
Usenet User wrote:

My GRE runs rings around the Uniden.


Perhaps you could provide a model number and a link to some information
about your particular scanner? That might be helpful.

How do you all feel about the Uniden BC246T handheld scanner?

http://www.eham.net/reviews/detail/4753

It gets some wonderful reviews. It seems that would be the perfect
scanner for me here in Swampeast Missouri. I've decided not to spend
any more money on my Uniden Pro 97

http://www.eham.net/reviews/detail/5082





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Old August 19th 09, 11:17 AM posted to rec.radio.scanner
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First recorded activity by RadioBanter: Jun 2009
Posts: 14
Default What is the best handheld scanner on the market today?

On Mon, 17 Aug 2009 17:17:21 -0500, Jack Newhouse
wrote:

On Sun, 19 Jul 2009 19:55:44 -0400, Usenet User
wrote:

Sorry, PSR500 portable and PSR600 desktop. Previously had the Uniden
996. Terrible digital trunking scanner. GRE have both been great and
audio is crisp and clear.

Golan Klinger wrote:
Usenet User wrote:

My GRE runs rings around the Uniden.

Perhaps you could provide a model number and a link to some information
about your particular scanner? That might be helpful.

How do you all feel about the Uniden BC246T handheld scanner?

http://www.eham.net/reviews/detail/4753

It gets some wonderful reviews. It seems that would be the perfect
scanner for me here in Swampeast Missouri. I've decided not to spend
any more money on my Uniden Pro 97

http://www.eham.net/reviews/detail/5082





Well, I went ahead and ordered a new GRE PSR 300 for $148.00 and a
W-881 Super Gainer BNC Portable Antenna for $32.95

They next one I want to buy is the Uniden BC246T. It has a totally
different way of working. so it might be fun to play around with that.

do you think these are good choices?
  #19   Report Post  
Old August 25th 09, 08:15 PM posted to rec.radio.scanner
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First recorded activity by RadioBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 44
Default What is the best handheld scanner on the market today?

"Jack Newhouse" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 17 Aug 2009 17:17:21 -0500, Jack Newhouse
wrote:

On Sun, 19 Jul 2009 19:55:44 -0400, Usenet User
wrote:

Sorry, PSR500 portable and PSR600 desktop. Previously had the Uniden
996. Terrible digital trunking scanner. GRE have both been great and
audio is crisp and clear.

Golan Klinger wrote:
Usenet User wrote:

My GRE runs rings around the Uniden.

Perhaps you could provide a model number and a link to some information
about your particular scanner? That might be helpful.

How do you all feel about the Uniden BC246T handheld scanner?

http://www.eham.net/reviews/detail/4753

It gets some wonderful reviews. It seems that would be the perfect
scanner for me here in Swampeast Missouri. I've decided not to spend
any more money on my Uniden Pro 97

http://www.eham.net/reviews/detail/5082





Well, I went ahead and ordered a new GRE PSR 300 for $148.00 and a
W-881 Super Gainer BNC Portable Antenna for $32.95

They next one I want to buy is the Uniden BC246T. It has a totally
different way of working. so it might be fun to play around with that.

do you think these are good choices?



I can speak highly of the BC246T, I have 2 of them. I bought the first one
not long after they hit because of size. Was using a Pro95 (that still
works) at work. The learning curve was a bit of a PITA since they are so
different, but after a little frustration I had it programmed and working. I
use the Radio Shack 800 MHz antennas on mine, they seem to work a little
better on the 800 band and are easier to carry. I often carry it in a
T-shirt pocket with another shirt over it. The reason I got the second one
was after a couple years of hard use at work, the first one was having
trouble with the switch for the earphone. It is used with an ear piece
plugged in at work. That one does still work but now and then I have to push
on the jack to get it to work. Second one has been going strong for a couple
years now.
--
Inside every older person is a younger person wondering, 'What the hell
happened?'

  #20   Report Post  
Old September 10th 09, 07:00 PM posted to rec.radio.scanner
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First recorded activity by RadioBanter: Sep 2009
Posts: 1
Default What is the best handheld scanner on the market today?

On Tue, 25 Aug 2009 12:15:23 -0700, "Alex Clayton"
wrote:

"Jack Newhouse" wrote in message
.. .
On Mon, 17 Aug 2009 17:17:21 -0500, Jack Newhouse
wrote:

On Sun, 19 Jul 2009 19:55:44 -0400, Usenet User
wrote:

Sorry, PSR500 portable and PSR600 desktop. Previously had the Uniden
996. Terrible digital trunking scanner. GRE have both been great and
audio is crisp and clear.

Golan Klinger wrote:
Usenet User wrote:

My GRE runs rings around the Uniden.

Perhaps you could provide a model number and a link to some information
about your particular scanner? That might be helpful.

How do you all feel about the Uniden BC246T handheld scanner?

http://www.eham.net/reviews/detail/4753

It gets some wonderful reviews. It seems that would be the perfect
scanner for me here in Swampeast Missouri. I've decided not to spend
any more money on my Uniden Pro 97

http://www.eham.net/reviews/detail/5082





Well, I went ahead and ordered a new GRE PSR 300 for $148.00 and a
W-881 Super Gainer BNC Portable Antenna for $32.95

They next one I want to buy is the Uniden BC246T. It has a totally
different way of working. so it might be fun to play around with that.

do you think these are good choices?



I can speak highly of the BC246T, I have 2 of them. I bought the first one
not long after they hit because of size. Was using a Pro95 (that still
works) at work. The learning curve was a bit of a PITA since they are so
different, but after a little frustration I had it programmed and working. I
use the Radio Shack 800 MHz antennas on mine, they seem to work a little
better on the 800 band and are easier to carry. I often carry it in a
T-shirt pocket with another shirt over it. The reason I got the second one
was after a couple years of hard use at work, the first one was having
trouble with the switch for the earphone. It is used with an ear piece
plugged in at work. That one does still work but now and then I have to push
on the jack to get it to work. Second one has been going strong for a couple
years now.


Well, I've had my GRE PSR 300 for about three weeks now, and I must
say I'm extremely happy with it. It looks like my Pro 97, but this
scanner is way more sensitive. In fact, it may be to sensitive. It
pulls in weaker stations much better, but I have to really tune the
squelch way way back to stop it from picking up every annoying humm,
click, and other unwanted noise on the bands.

I would definitely rate it a "10" on a scale of ten. I already have
some trunking stuff programmed into it and that works well too.

Thanks for suggesting the GSE PSR 300. I'm as happy as a mouse in a
cheese factory now. And I only paid $148.00 for it.

I also bought a highly sensitive antenna from Scannermaster. It cost
me nearly $40.00 Perhaps that it is another reason why it receives so
well. The antenna is flexible rubber also. So when it get bent, or
jammed it springs back to it's original shape.

http://barckobama.buildlastingsuccess.com


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