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Old January 23rd 04, 03:41 AM
Phil Nelson
 
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Default Poor man's chassis holder

This is almost too dumb to mention, but after years of struggling to prop up
heavy chassis on my workbench, it finally occurred to me to screw some heavy
corner braces into the chassis mounting holes. Doh! This is especially handy
with this particular chassis, which is narrow and heavy. If you put braces
on all four corners, you can even turn the chassis upside down without
crunching original components.

http://antiqueradio.org/art/temp/chassisholder.jpg

Regards,

Phil Nelson
Phil's Old Radios
http://antiqueradio.org/index.html



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Old January 23rd 04, 05:29 AM
Tim Wescott
 
Posts: n/a
Default

The best ideas are the ones that make you feel _really stupid_ when you
think of them -- because no one else has thought of them either.

"Phil Nelson" wrote in message
ink.net...
This is almost too dumb to mention, but after years of struggling to prop

up
heavy chassis on my workbench, it finally occurred to me to screw some

heavy
corner braces into the chassis mounting holes. Doh! This is especially

handy
with this particular chassis, which is narrow and heavy. If you put braces
on all four corners, you can even turn the chassis upside down without
crunching original components.

http://antiqueradio.org/art/temp/chassisholder.jpg

Regards,

Phil Nelson
Phil's Old Radios
http://antiqueradio.org/index.html




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Old January 23rd 04, 10:20 AM
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Fri, 23 Jan 2004 03:41:42 UTC, "Phil Nelson"
wrote:

This is almost too dumb to mention, but after years of struggling to prop up
heavy chassis on my workbench, it finally occurred to me to screw some heavy
corner braces into the chassis mounting holes. Doh! This is especially handy
with this particular chassis, which is narrow and heavy. If you put braces
on all four corners, you can even turn the chassis upside down without
crunching original components.

http://antiqueradio.org/art/temp/chassisholder.jpg

Regards,

Phil Nelson
Phil's Old Radios
http://antiqueradio.org/index.html


Very nice Phil,

Here's more to consider. 10 years ago, I saw a rig at a local
small PC shop that was a lazy susan with a rack mounted on it that
held a PC on it's side.

There was a lot to it, storage bins, power strip, etc. Seems to
me that a single vertical brace with a slot in it would hold almost
any radio on its side.

If the brace were tied to a piece of plywood on a lazy susan and
there were hangers for wires as well as mounts for a DVM and scope,
that would make an ergonomic radio work area.

de ah6gi/4


--

  #4   Report Post  
Old January 23rd 04, 05:36 PM
Biz WDØHCO
 
Posts: n/a
Default

NICE TOUCH - YOU CAN ADD THE OTHER L BRACKET TO MAKE AN UPSIDE DOWN "T" TO
KEEP THE CHASSIS FROM FALLING OVER THE OTHER WAY.

I ALSO LIKE YOUR BOOKSHELF - I NOTICE YOU HAVE THE "COYNE PRACTICAL
TELEVISION SERVICING AND TROUBLESHOOTING MANUAL". FROM THE COYNE ELECTRICAL
AND RADIO SCHOOL.

PRETTY GOOD BOOK - I HAVE THE COMPLETE SET MYSELF - READ AND RE-READ THEM
MANY TIMES FOR SHEER ENJOYMENT - TOO BAD THE SCHOOL IS NO LONGER IN
BUSINESS. :^(

-BIZ WDØHCO


On Fri, 23 Jan 2004 03:41:42 UTC, "Phil Nelson"
wrote:

This is almost too dumb to mention, but after years of struggling to prop up
heavy chassis on my workbench, it finally occurred to me to screw some heavy
corner braces into the chassis mounting holes. Doh! This is especially handy
with this particular chassis, which is narrow and heavy. If you put braces
on all four corners, you can even turn the chassis upside down without
crunching original components.

http://antiqueradio.org/art/temp/chassisholder.jpg

Regards,

Phil Nelson
Phil's Old Radios
http://antiqueradio.org/index.html



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Old January 23rd 04, 10:23 PM
Mike Knudsen
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article . net, "Phil
Nelson" writes:

This is almost too dumb to mention, but after years of struggling to prop up
heavy chassis on my workbench, it finally occurred to me to screw some heavy
corner braces into the chassis mounting holes.


Great idea, but what about a chassis that has no holes in it for the bolts to
go thru? Most readers of this newsgroup would not like to drill new holes in a
vintage chassis.

For years I have put off repairing my Philco 38-116, because its huge chassis
has projecting studs that prevent it from resting on its sides on the bench. I
will probably sell this radio (console) as-is before building something to hold
the chassis.
--Mike K.

Oscar loves trash, but hates Spam! Delete him to reply to me.


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Old January 24th 04, 05:11 AM
Tim Wescott
 
Posts: n/a
Default

If it's a steel chassis, use neodymium magnets, possibly with electrical
tape to enhance friction. The two big problems that you have with these are
(a) getting them apart once they've attached themselves to a piece of iron,
and (b) keeping their fragile little selves from shattering when you fumble
them and they bonk into each other at great velocity.

You can do a web search on on the obvious and get a half-dozen or more
vendors. I just ordered some from Gaussboys (www.gaussboys.com); they were
very prompt, and the magnets seem to be good quality.

--------------------------------------
Tim Wescott
Wescott Design Services
http://www.wescottdesign.com


"Mike Knudsen" wrote in message
...
In article . net, "Phil
Nelson" writes:

This is almost too dumb to mention, but after years of struggling to prop

up
heavy chassis on my workbench, it finally occurred to me to screw some

heavy
corner braces into the chassis mounting holes.


Great idea, but what about a chassis that has no holes in it for the bolts

to
go thru? Most readers of this newsgroup would not like to drill new holes

in a
vintage chassis.

For years I have put off repairing my Philco 38-116, because its huge

chassis
has projecting studs that prevent it from resting on its sides on the

bench. I
will probably sell this radio (console) as-is before building something to

hold
the chassis.
--Mike K.

Oscar loves trash, but hates Spam! Delete him to reply to me.



  #7   Report Post  
Old January 24th 04, 12:10 PM
AComarow
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Subject: Poor man's chassis holder
From: "Tim Wescott"
Date: 1/24/04 12:11 AM Eastern Standard Time

If it's a steel chassis, use neodymium magnets, possibly with electrical
tape to enhance friction. The two big problems that you have with these are
(a) getting them apart once they've attached themselves to a piece of iron,
and (b) keeping their fragile little selves from shattering when you fumble
them and they bonk into each other at great velocity.

You can do a web search on on the obvious and get a half-dozen or more
vendors. I just ordered some from Gaussboys (
www.gaussboys.com); they were
very prompt, and the magnets seem to be good quality.

"Mike Knudsen" wrote in message
"Phil
Nelson" writes:

This is almost too dumb to mention, but after years of struggling to prop

up
heavy chassis on my workbench, it finally occurred to me to screw some

heavy
corner braces into the chassis mounting holes.


Great idea, but what about a chassis that has no holes in it for the bolts

to
go thru? Most readers of this newsgroup would not like to drill new holes

in a
vintage chassis.

For years I have put off repairing my Philco 38-116, because its huge

chassis
has projecting studs that prevent it from resting on its sides on the

bench. I
will probably sell this radio (console) as-is before building something to

hold
the chassis.
--Mike K.


Mike and others,

While this isn't as cheap as brackets or magnets, a wonderful solution is a
wooden chassis holder crafted by a retired vocational drafting instructor in
Oklahoma City named Steve Strong. He has two sizes, a small one for your
ordinary chassis dimensions, and a large one for TV chassis and those from
consoles or other oversized products. I have both. If I remember right, the
small one is about $30 plus shipping and the large one about $40 or $45. They
are rugged and beautifully made, worth far more. You won't believe the
craftsmanship.

The chassis is secured to the holder with metal brackets bolted to the
underside. It's easier to see than explain. Once in place, the chassis can be
rotated through 360 degrees and fixed in place to work on.

Get in touch with Steve and ask him to send a .pdf file, which will give you a
better idea than my description can. Say I said Hi. His email address is
.

Good luck!

Avery W3AVE
Potomac, Md.


  #8   Report Post  
Old January 25th 04, 02:03 PM
AComarow
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I discovered that I do have .pdf files of Steve Strong's chassis holders, both
the small and large versions. Anybody who wants to see them should email me off
the list.

Avery W3AVE
Potomac, Md.

Subject: Poor man's chassis holder
From: (AComarow)
Date: 1/24/04 7:10 AM Eastern Standard Time


"Mike Knudsen" wrote in message
For years I have put off repairing my Philco 38-116, because its huge

chassis
has projecting studs that prevent it from resting on its sides on the

bench. I
will probably sell this radio (console) as-is before building something to

hold
the chassis.
--Mike K.


Mike and others,

While this isn't as cheap as brackets or magnets, a wonderful solution is a
wooden chassis holder crafted by a retired vocational drafting instructor in
Oklahoma City named Steve Strong. He has two sizes, a small one for your
ordinary chassis dimensions, and a large one for TV chassis and those from
consoles or other oversized products. I have both. If I remember right, the
small one is about $30 plus shipping and the large one about $40 or $45. They
are rugged and beautifully made, worth far more. You won't believe the
craftsmanship.

The chassis is secured to the holder with metal brackets bolted to the
underside. It's easier to see than explain. Once in place, the chassis can be
rotated through 360 degrees and fixed in place to work on.

Get in touch with Steve and ask him to send a .pdf file, which will give you
a
better idea than my description can. Say I said Hi. His email address is
.

Good luck!

Avery W3AVE
Potomac, Md.




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