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Old July 25th 03, 08:29 AM
Dwight Stewart
 
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Default ATTN: Tech Licensee USA Morse Code Freedom Day is August 1st

" wrote:

Let the FCC know that they can no longer keep you
from your right to use the ten meter band allocation
if you are a technician licensee. (snip)

You don't have to use your identity, (snip)

(snip) I will be on the air and I hope 10,000 or
more no code technicians will join me. (snip)



And I suspect anyone who did this would find himself very much alone on
those frequencies. Only an idiot would risk his license doing something like
this. That and your provocative email address, should be enough to convince
most you message is nothing more than a message trolling for suckers foolish
enough to take it seriously.


Dwight Stewart (W5NET)

http://www.qsl.net/w5net/


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Old July 25th 03, 08:48 AM
Keith
 
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Default

On Fri, 25 Jul 2003 03:29:59 -0400, Dwight Stewart wrote:

" wrote:

Let the FCC know that they can no longer keep you
from your right to use the ten meter band allocation
if you are a technician licensee. (snip)

You don't have to use your identity, (snip)

(snip) I will be on the air and I hope 10,000 or
more no code technicians will join me. (snip)



And I suspect anyone who did this would find himself very much alone on
those frequencies. Only an idiot would risk his license doing something like
this. That and your provocative email address, should be enough to convince
most you message is nothing more than a message trolling for suckers foolish
enough to take it seriously.


Dwight Stewart (W5NET)

http://www.qsl.net/w5net/


Dwight, There is no way for anyone to know if a tech license has passed a
morse code test and all techs have voice privileges for 28.3-28.5 MHz.
What is the FCC going to do run around and check every tech license holder?
Besides would you rather give up ten meters to truckers and CBers?


--
The Radio Page Ham, Police Scanner, Shortwave and more.
http://www.kilowatt-radio.org/
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Old July 25th 03, 04:19 PM
Spamhater
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Keith" wrote in message
...
On Fri, 25 Jul 2003 03:29:59 -0400, Dwight Stewart

wrote:

" wrote:

Let the FCC know that they can no longer keep you
from your right to use the ten meter band allocation
if you are a technician licensee. (snip)

You don't have to use your identity, (snip)

(snip) I will be on the air and I hope 10,000 or
more no code technicians will join me. (snip)



And I suspect anyone who did this would find himself very much alone

on
those frequencies. Only an idiot would risk his license doing something

like
this. That and your provocative email address, should be enough to

convince
most you message is nothing more than a message trolling for suckers

foolish
enough to take it seriously.


Dwight Stewart (W5NET)

http://www.qsl.net/w5net/


Dwight, There is no way for anyone to know if a tech license has passed a
morse code test and all techs have voice privileges for 28.3-28.5 MHz.
What is the FCC going to do run around and check every tech license

holder?
Besides would you rather give up ten meters to truckers and CBers?


--
The Radio Page Ham, Police Scanner, Shortwave and more.
http://www.kilowatt-radio.org/


The above argument sucks... ANYONE who values their license "AGREES" to
abide by the Rules and Regulations. YOUR argument that the FCC can't go
checking all call signs and such is the same as this..... ALL Junior
Operators of vehicles at - least here in PA, have to be off the street by a
certain time of night and not much before day light can they get on the
streets with a vehicle.. SO, will the cops stop EVERY car to see if they are
a Junior Operator or NOT? NO, it is impractical.. But it STILL does NOT give
you the authority to do as you damned well please. RULES AND LAWS are made
to be adhered to.. YOU being a part of the lawless society are more a part
of the problem than the solution. TO PROVOKE lawlessness IS a part of the
problem. YOUR telling NO CODE techs to go on air without proper license -
should the blind sheep follow, is as illegal as the CBers who are there as
well. As I said, YOUR ARGUMENT SUCKS. PLUS, 5 wpm code is as lame as you can
get. Once you learn the code, taking the test at 5 wpm will seem boring. It
will be easier than you think..... THOUSANDS have passed it - myself
INCLUDED.. I detect LAZINESS AND LAWLESSNESS. When YOU SIGN A 610 form, now
a 605 for an Amateur License, OR any other form for an FCC license or
permit, YOU "AGREE" to uphold the rules and laws. READ IT........ A man is
only as good as his word, and if you agree to something then fall back on
it, you are not a man of good deed. PLAIN AND SIMPLE........ Hell, why not
provoke people to break all the laws... Allow anyone of any age, ability or
back ground to drink, drive, possess firearms, use radios, whatever... See
how long it takes before there is utter chaos. CRAZY, SIMPLY
CRAZY................... ONE MORE THING..... when a person ACCEPTS the
"agreement" to honor the "PRIVILEGES" earned via that license, they as a
rule do NOT or SHOULD NOT talk to those NOT properly licensed. The ONLY
exception being for preservation of life.

JMS


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Old July 25th 03, 05:17 PM
Dwight Stewart
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Keith" wrote:

Dwight, There is no way for anyone to know if
a tech license has passed a morse code test
and all techs have voice privileges for 28.3-
28.5 MHz. What is the FCC going to do run
around and check every tech license holder?
Besides would you rather give up ten meters
to truckers and CBers?



I would not do what you're seeking even if there was absolutely no chance
at all for the FCC to catch me. When I joined the Amateur Radio community, I
made a commitment to abide by the rules and regulations associated with it.
That commitment is not based on the FCC's enforcement ability, but my own
sense of what is good for this community. I personally benefit from a
community that has an equal commitment to abide by the rules and
regulations. I therefore would not do anything to upset that situation.

I suspect you will eventually find that most other Technician license
holders have a similar commitment to abide by the rules and regulation.

By the way, your statement that "all techs have voice privileges for
28.3-28.5 MHz" is simply not true - only a Technician Plus license holder (a
Tech who has also passed the 5wpm code test) is allowed to operate on those
frequencies.


Dwight Stewart (W5NET)

http://www.qsl.net/w5net/

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Old July 25th 03, 05:37 PM
Alun Palmer
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Dwight Stewart wrote in
:

"Keith" wrote:

Dwight, There is no way for anyone to know if
a tech license has passed a morse code test
and all techs have voice privileges for 28.3-
28.5 MHz. What is the FCC going to do run
around and check every tech license holder?
Besides would you rather give up ten meters to truckers and CBers?



I would not do what you're seeking even if there was absolutely no
chance
at all for the FCC to catch me. When I joined the Amateur Radio
community, I made a commitment to abide by the rules and regulations
associated with it. That commitment is not based on the FCC's
enforcement ability, but my own sense of what is good for this
community. I personally benefit from a community that has an equal
commitment to abide by the rules and regulations. I therefore would not
do anything to upset that situation.

I suspect you will eventually find that most other Technician license
holders have a similar commitment to abide by the rules and regulation.

By the way, your statement that "all techs have voice privileges for
28.3-28.5 MHz" is simply not true - only a Technician Plus license
holder (a Tech who has also passed the 5wpm code test) is allowed to
operate on those frequencies.


Dwight Stewart (W5NET)

http://www.qsl.net/w5net/



s97.301(e) reads:

For a station having a control operator who has been
granted an operator license of Novice Class or Technician
Class and who has received credit for proficiency in
telegraphy in accordance with the international
requirements.

(followed by frequency table)

The 'international requirements' (ITU-R s25.5) now read:

Administrations shall determine whether or not a person seeking a licence
to operate an amateur station shall demonstrate the ability to send and
receive texts in Morse code signals.

There is no international requirement for proficiency in telegraphy, so
arguably any Tech could operate on all the frequencies listed in the
table. Be prepared to argue it in court, though!




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Old July 25th 03, 05:40 PM
JJ
 
Posts: n/a
Default



Keith wrote:
On Fri, 25 Jul 2003 21:56:50 GMT, "Dee D. Flint" wrote:


While not a violation of the international treaty, it would be a violation
of the current FCC rules. They are quite clear that Techs (at this time)
must have passed a code test to use HF.



NO! This is what the rules say:

s97.301(e) reads:

For a station having a control operator who has been
granted an operator license of Novice Class or Technician
Class and who has received credit for proficiency in
telegraphy in accordance with the international requirements.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^
(followed by frequency table)



Now we have the new regs from WRC that are NOW in effect. They require no morse
code test except set down by the administration so a tech licensee should be in
compliance with the requirement set down in 97.301(e) There is no requirement
for morse code test except for the requirement by the international morse code
requirements.


WRC has dropped the code requirement, the FCC has not as of yet, so
everything is still as before, nothing has changed. What a twit!!

  #7   Report Post  
Old July 25th 03, 07:33 PM
Keith
 
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Default

On Fri, 25 Jul 2003 12:17:08 -0400, Dwight Stewart wrote:

Technician Plus license holder


The FCC does not issue technician plus license any more so I guess no one can
operate on 10 meters that has passed the tech license test?

Hey Dwight have you ever driven 56 in 55 mph zone?


--
The Radio Page Ham, Police Scanner, Shortwave and more.
http://www.kilowatt-radio.org/
  #8   Report Post  
Old July 25th 03, 07:45 PM
Keith
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On 25 Jul 2003 16:37:40 GMT, Alun Palmer wrote:

s97.301(e) reads:

For a station having a control operator who has been
granted an operator license of Novice Class or Technician
Class and who has received credit for proficiency in
telegraphy in accordance with the international
requirements.

(followed by frequency table)

The 'international requirements' (ITU-R s25.5) now read:

Administrations shall determine whether or not a person seeking a licence
to operate an amateur station shall demonstrate the ability to send and
receive texts in Morse code signals.

There is no international requirement for proficiency in telegraphy, so
arguably any Tech could operate on all the frequencies listed in the
table. Be prepared to argue it in court, though!


That is what I'm talking about. There is no longer a international requirement
for morse code so tech's can pick up the microphone and talk on 10 meters.
Here in America the FCC has to issue a warning notice, then a violation notice
and the person cited can then simply demand a hearing before a administrative
law judge. The ALJ is a pretty informal process and you just need to cite the
rules and they are not very strict when it comes to matters like these.
If you have a tech license and you operate outside your allowed bands like pop
up in the twenty meter band and keep it up they might come after you. But if
you meet the international requirements and stay in the HF TECH bands it is not
a violation of the rules and no one can verify if you have passed a horse and
buggy CW test any god damn way.


--
The Radio Page Ham, Police Scanner, Shortwave and more.
http://www.kilowatt-radio.org/
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Old July 25th 03, 08:47 PM
'Doc
 
Posts: n/a
Default



Keith,
What you don't seem to realize is that the 'rule'
you quoted is NOT law in this country. Until it has
been adopted, it's only a recomendation. So until
the new ITU recomendations are accepted by the US,
nothing has changed.
It doesn't matter if the 'no-code' rule WILL be
changed. Until it IS changed, there is NO change.
The ITU can't change US law, only the US government
can do that. It's okay to be happy about the proposed
code change, but don't be stupid...
'Doc
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Old July 25th 03, 09:01 PM
Michael Black
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Keith ) writes:
On 25 Jul 2003 16:37:40 GMT, Alun Palmer wrote:

s97.301(e) reads:

For a station having a control operator who has been
granted an operator license of Novice Class or Technician
Class and who has received credit for proficiency in
telegraphy in accordance with the international
requirements.

(followed by frequency table)

The 'international requirements' (ITU-R s25.5) now read:

Administrations shall determine whether or not a person seeking a licence
to operate an amateur station shall demonstrate the ability to send and
receive texts in Morse code signals.

There is no international requirement for proficiency in telegraphy, so
arguably any Tech could operate on all the frequencies listed in the
table. Be prepared to argue it in court, though!


That is what I'm talking about. There is no longer a international requirement
for morse code so tech's can pick up the microphone and talk on 10 meters.
Here in America the FCC has to issue a warning notice, then a violation notice
and the person cited can then simply demand a hearing before a administrative
law judge. The ALJ is a pretty informal process and you just need to cite the
rules and they are not very strict when it comes to matters like these.
If you have a tech license and you operate outside your allowed bands like pop
up in the twenty meter band and keep it up they might come after you. But if
you meet the international requirements and stay in the HF TECH bands it is not
a violation of the rules and no one can verify if you have passed a horse and
buggy CW test any god damn way.


This is silly. Each country has it's own laws, and you are obliged
to follow them.

What has changed is that the treaty agreement whereby all countries
issuing amateur radio licenses are obliged to have a code test of some
sort for operating below 30MHz (or, was it a higher frequency?) is now
gone.

That means that each country no longer has to conform to that treaty
agreement.

They can, if they so choose, to eliminate their law that requires
code proficiency for amateurs operating in the HF bands.

But they are not obligated to do so.

Until a country changes it's law about this, everyone is obligated
to follow those laws.

Just because the treaty agreement is gone does not mean that there
is any more legality for someone who hasn't taken a code test to operate
at HF. Two months ago, someone could have done it, and if caught they
would face a certain process. If they do it today, and are caught,
they face the same certain process. Nothing has changed on that
account.

Michael VE2BVW



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